Customer Reviews for

A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
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  • Posted November 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An intimate side in recent American history

    Images of protesters being waterhosed by local police. Angry white crowds yelling and throwing objects at Black students entering school doors. Bombed-out homes. All very familiar pictures of America's 1960's Civil Rights era.
    But what was it like to LIVE through it? To undergo the mental and physical onslaught of attending school under brain-numbingly stressful conditions, with the eyes of the nation and the world watching and judging your every move - at the age of 14?
    Carlotta Walls LaNier takes readers through her personal experience as the youngest of the "Little Rock Nine": the 9 tremendously brave boys and girls that were the first to integrate Little Rock's Central Senior High School in 1957.
    More than a blow-for-blow recounting of the events already detailed in vintage LIFE Magazine articles and countless other documentaries, 'A Mighty Long Way' provides a intimate window into the HOW and WHY these children - and their families - were to serve as front-lines soldiers in a tretcherous - and sometimes dangerous - battle for the simple right to attend public school.
    Sombering, touching, and sometimes surprising, 'A Mighty Long Way' tells of Carlotta Walls LaNier's incredible personal journey through a shameful chapter of American History.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    You dont know me as whitenight tha cat slowy fades into the darkness... whitefire says goodby

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2012

    She stands, eyes filling with tears. "I never stopd loving you, but youre right. I never made anyone happy. Ind thays why Im gone, nobody liked me."

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  • Posted October 3, 2011

    Great book!

    The author's descriptions of the events that happened transported me through time as if I was experiencing it myself. The verbal abuse and sneaky attacks in the halls of Central High School mirror some of the bullying that still happens today in America's schools. It is disturbing at times. In order to appreciate the present times, we must take a look at the past no matter how disturbing it was. I highly recommend this book!

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  • Posted September 14, 2011

    Excellent Primary Source on Integration

    This book tells the first hand account of one of the Little Rock Nine African Americans who were the first to integrate Central High School in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas. This account is riveting, emotional, and very powerful in describing the trauma these students faced as they became historical figures in the civil rights movement. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a personal account of this historical event!

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  • Posted March 11, 2011

    A Must read if you no little or nothing about Little Rock Nine

    "A Might Long Way" was emotional from the forward by President Bill Clinton to the last page. Mrs. Lanier book is well written and seems like she has been writing books forever. She told her story of integrated an all white High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. The book read like a novel and only if it was fiction it would not hurt as bad to relive her struggle to get a better education for herself which help all Americans to get a better education. "A Might Long Way" had no bad qualities. The story was told with enough detail setting you up for the next event in the author's life. "A Mighty Long Way" made me proud and grateful that these nine young men and woman endured the spiting and tripping and other awful things so I could have a better life. It taught us that this was not a one day event or a one year event this was a minimal four year event and probably longer for those who followed in their footsteps. It also educated me because I was really ignorant on the history. Yes I have heard of Little Rock Nine but I did not know the details of the story. Mrs. Lanier story was one of courage and struggle. It reminded me of the struggles I go through with being a minority in my own profession. The book made me think of the barriers that are still in front of minorities and made me wonder would there be a time that all barriers would fall for good. President Obama election has brought out the worst in race relations; so not even a minority president has brought down barriers. "A Might Long Way" reminded me of how many people before me has pave the way so I can have the life I have now. It also gives me the strength to try and fight my way through a field where minority still struggle to be recognize. I enjoyed learning so much about Little Rock Nine's struggle to integrate Central High School that I would consider reading books by any of the other eight that may have written their stories on Little Rock Nine.

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  • Posted December 30, 2009

    This? in my lifetime

    I am the approximate age of the author, the youungest of the "Little Rock Nine",and while as a kid I didn't pay much attention to happenings that didn't directly impact me, it is hard to believe the level of hate the southern segregationist of the time had. No gevernor today would even think of flaunting and challenging the federal government the way Arkansas' Faubus did. While the author's story as one of the students demonstrated thier bravery and resolve, I really admire their parents. I don't think I could put my kids through what they went through, no matter how strong my convictions were. Their decision changed history.

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    Posted May 22, 2011

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    Posted July 4, 2011

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    Posted October 1, 2013

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    Posted March 20, 2011

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