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Mind Games

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  • Posted August 5, 2012

    Good Information...Poorly Written

    Andre Kole does have the expertise to recognize a trick when he sees it. He does a good job pointing out the hoaxes that are used to trick people into believing a fraud is reality.
    However, he makes several logical fallacies in the book. He can't seem to decide what he thinks about the witch of Endor, for example.
    He also has a tendancy to lump pop psychology with accurate psychological principles. Sure, Freud said some dumb things. Freud also said some very true things. Kole tends to throw the baby out with the bathwater and if everyone took his advice regarding psychology, they could be hurt.
    He exposes some fraud in Christendom as well, but again, makes a logical fallacy when he claims those perpetuating the frauds also "love God." Can't love God and defraud people or lie at the same time. You'd think as a Christian man himself he would know that.
    He discusses name it and claim it nonsense but ignores other things the religious in Christendom tend to swallow hook, line and sinker, such as the "Holy laughter" fraud and the "slain in the Spirit" tricksters.
    In his section on UFO's he points out common mistakes made. That's all well and good. However, he states he'll discuss things that are harder to explain but then never does so.
    He also seems to waver on his take about demons at times.
    He leaves a thinker reader wondering whether he's trying to be an apologist or he himself just found another way to make a buck writing a pseudo-religious book.
    He mentions a book in passing titled "Fakers" written by a magician and co-authored by a psychiatrist that is a much better treatise on the issue.

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