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Mind Wide Open: Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 14 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2007

    A reviewer

    A highly entertaining, thought provoking, and pleasant read. It's sort of a blend of science and popular philosophy, the musings of a creative and bright guy. Mr. Johnson addresses a subject that is of great interest to me, namely neurotransmitter systems such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. He also touches upon Peter Kramer's 'Listening to Prozac' and the neurotransmitter personality model of C. Robert Cloninger. Mr. Johnson points out that low serotonin may be the cause of the psychological condition of rejection sensitivity, although this may actually be caused by a high level of norepinephrine as well. My only significant criticism is that Mr. Johnson may be speculating a bit much, and making somewhat of sweeping generalizations to suit his own ideas. Nonetheless, this book is well worth reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2012

    A book which makes you think about the way you think

    "Mind Wide Open" describes the different neurotransmitters of the brain and how they affect the way people think and interact with their surroundings. It was extremely interesting; it goes in depth about the things we do which are usually overlooked, such as reading facial expressions, paying attention, memory, trauma, etc. The book specifically describes which neurotransmitter controls each function. It is written in an informative tone and also includes personal examples which could be related to personal experiences of the reader as well. In my English class we are doing an ethnography on how brain tumors effect the functioning of individuals in everyday life. This book pertains to that in the sense that it educated me more about the brain, so I will know which specific questions to ask our interviewees depending on where the brain tumor is located. I would recommend reading "Mind Wide Open" if you are interested in psychology or want to become more informed about neurotransmitters. If you are looking to read a novel or fictional story, this book is not the one for you. I have not read any other books by the author, Steven Johnson, but they are all about scattered subjects which don’t pertain to the human mind. Therefore, if this book doesn’t sound like the one for you, odds are he wrote another that will strike your interests. Examples are “Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation”, “The Ghost Map”, “Long Tales and Short Stories”, and “Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Softwares”. Overall, I would give "Mind Wide Open" 4 stars, because it taught me a lot of new information I had never known before.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2005

    The One Brain Book to Read

    I have read four other books wholly concerned with the human brain and Mind Wide Open is one of the best. Author Steven Johnson has written a delightfully easy to read book, contemporary and with concepts laid out clearly enough for the common man to grasp and then supplemented with thirty-eight pages of footnotes at the end of the book. Footnotes without those annoying superscripted numbers dotting the text like so many squashed gnats. (Footnote entries that force meticulous people like me to stop my reading and flip to the footnotes in the rear of the book, then realize that I didn't get the chapter and page number needed to locate the specific footnote, so then I flip back to the text to get the chapter and page number, then flip to the back of the book once again, read the footnote, then flip back to the text to continue my reading until the next irritating little number halts me once more.) So much of the mystery of the brain for Mr.Johnson revolves around how this or that or those unbelievably complicated and currently unknowable brain functions evolved. Myself, being a hayseed-dolt who lives in fly-over country, believes we were created by the God celebrated and feared in the Judeo-Christian Bible. The author ponders: Why do these hormones act the way they do in our brain? Because that's the way the God, who created the thousands of galaxies, from a beginning the size of a golf ball, designed us. Why is music such an incredibly important part of human existence? Because God created us to praise Him in song. Since I harbor little disagreement with how Mr. Johnson presents the affects of hormones on our brains, only the why, and although evolution is mentioned on virtually every page, I found it easy to ignore the unrelenting natural selection declarations, and I can highly recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2005

    Awesome Book

    Enlightened me in various aspects of my life and the behavior of myself and others. This book is definitely an interesting read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2004

    Best Book I Read this Year

    I loved the book. Took me 7 intensive days to read it, because it kept making stop and think about my thinking. Amazing!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2004

    A good basic guide

    If you're really intrigued by the idea of neuroscience, this is a great 'easing-in' point. There's enough scientific detail (and a helpful appendix) to make it informative, but the writing style is very readable--more narrative non-fiction than hard science--which I say as praise!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    A good read

    Mind Wide Open has really looked deep into the reactions of human nature and I liked it. However, I have read more insightful books about neuroscience. I do recomend this book because it is well written and very informative. Good Job.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2004

    Excellent book

    This book is great for learning how the brain works. I think it is a real eye-opener and if you are interested in neuro-science this book is for you. If you are interested in mental optimization, emotional mastery and making the most of every situation, get a copy of Optimal Thinking-How To Be Your Best Self as well. These two books are all you will ever need to be your best and make the most of your mind.

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