Customer Reviews for

Miracle on 34th Street

Average Rating 4
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2005

    The Best Book

    I read this book as a child and have kept on reading it ever since. It is truely a Christmas Classic!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2013

    One of the best Holiday classics ever. The book follows the 194

    One of the best Holiday classics ever. The book follows the 1947 movie plot. A thoroughly enjoyable read that will appeal to young and old alike. Well written. Well edited. Recommend to anyone who enjoys Christmas stories. It will make you believe in Santa Clause again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 27, 2012

    Everyone who has ever seen the original 1947 movie Miracle on 34

    Everyone who has ever seen the original 1947 movie Miracle on 34th
    Street (we don’t like the remakes) knows the basic plot of this book.
    Kris Kringle is an elderly gentleman who lives at the Maplewood Home for
    the Aged in New York City, NY. When the Santa hired for Macy’s
    Thanksgiving Day Parade shows up drunk, Doris Walker, the somewhat
    frosty, divorced Personnel Director at Macy’s, hires Kris to take his
    place, and Mr. Shellhammer, Head of the Toy Department, suggests that
    she keep Kris for the permanent job of Santa at Macy’s Department Store
    on 34th St., where he creates a lot of good will which even owner R. H.
    Macy notices. Kris even affects Doris’s daughter, six-year-old
    Susan, who has been brought up by her disillusioned mother to be as
    matter-of-fact as herself, and their neighbor and Doris’s would-be
    boyfriend Fred Gailey, a lawyer with whom Kris moves in. Everything is
    going well until people begin to find out that Kris actually believes
    that he is the real Santa Claus. So the Macy’s company psychologist,
    Albert Sawyer, who dislikes Santa Claus anyway, decides to have Kris
    committed to Bellevue insane asylum and does so secretly without Doris’s
    knowledge. When he learns about it, Fred petitions for a court hearing
    to decide Kris’s sanity and determines to have him declared sane. What
    will happen in court? And how will Susan react? Of course, those who
    have watched the film know the answer to those questions. Some
    people have complained that this is a mere “novelization” of the movie.
    Sometimes an existing book is made into a movie, and sometimes an
    existing movie is “novelized” into a book. What happened in the case of
    Miracle on 34th Street is not so clear. Author Valentine Davies
    (1905-1961) was a Hollywood screenwriter, but if I understand it
    correctly, he first wrote it in story form around 1944, then later
    submitted it to Twentieth Century-Fox, where it was turned into a film.
    It was decided to publish a book to coincide with the release of the
    film, so Davies reworked his story, fleshing it out with material from
    the screenplay. There are some noticeable differences between the movie
    and the book, but the basic plot is the same. The only objectionable
    items in the novel are one use of the “d” word, one appearance of the
    term “Good Lord” as an interjection, and the fact that Fred smokes a
    pipe. Otherwise, it is a really cute story.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2014

    Dated

    Store p .r . perhaps book based on script reads like one rather than a book that a movie was based on

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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