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Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

17 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

A Whole New Way of Looking at Baseball Statistics

Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis...
Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis is a very entertaining writer, at times laugh out loud funny, who has turned what could have been a very dry subject into a real page turner. I read this in one day, which is unusual for me with non-fiction. Highly recommended, especially in the dead of winter when the beginning of baseball season seems so far away.

posted by tsmom1219 on May 14, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Moneyball

The author got caught up describiNG tHE mind numbiNG statistics used in major league baseball I found myself skipplng pages to get to the part about the players

posted by Anonymous on December 30, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2011

    Moneyball

    The author got caught up describiNG tHE mind numbiNG statistics used in major league baseball I found myself skipplng pages to get to the part about the players

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    Highly overrated

    I am a real baseball fan! Somehow, I missed the attraction of this book. The management concept was interesting, but not a book worth. The excess pages are filled with an ode to the egos involved.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2012

    Lame

    Hard to follow

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2006

    HYPOCRISY

    Moneyball is a funny book, and it uncovers an interesting side of baseball, but it is very hypocritical. Maybe the theories work fine, but the A's haven't even made it to the playoffs in the last two years. Lewis tries to convince the reader that clutch hitting doesn't exist. WHAT'S WRONG WITH YOU??? Some players can't hit a lick with pressure on, and others can. Period. There is a human side to baseball too-a side that Lewis neglects to mention. Of the SEVEN players that the A's get to draft in the first round in 2002, four have yet to have a major league at-bat. Read Three Nights in August. That will show you how baseball is to be managed.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2004

    Too inconsistent for me

    There were certain aspects of the book that were very interesting-- the 'behind the scenes' look at action before the trading deadline was especially fun to read about. But the rest of it was too inconsistent for me.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2003

    A Dull Puff Piece

    The irony is that despite a few 90+ win seasons, Billy Beane's A's fail in the playoffs year after agonizing year BECAUSE of their lock-step reliance on statistics to the ignorance of a crucial facet that has propeled champions like Atlanta, New York and Minnesota. That facet is a team centered character and ability to perform under pressure (clutch). Aside from glimpses of undeveloped subplot--a voyeuristic and embarrassing portrait of Beane's flaws of arrested emotional development--the book has no hook to keep interest alive throughout the torpid pace of dry statistical discourse. Lewis' transparently sycophantic paean to Beane would have been a captivating read if it focused as much on Beane's unstable emotionalism. Beane's bizarre tantrums, and narcissistically warped view of himself as a Gordon Geco-eque pioneer/raider were fascinating, if only in the sense of a car wreck. Lewis however, inexplicably chose to focus on Beane's un-credited 'epiphany' about On Base Percentage. Here is but one inconvenient fact grossly omitted: That (long before Beane washed out as a stage frightened Triple A prospect)Gene Michael, John Shuerholz, John Hart and Pat Gillick built winners by placing greater value on certain stats--On Base Percentage, Slugging Percentage, Runs Scored--,over traditional stats--HomeRuns, Stolen Bases, and Batting Aaverage, in player evaluation and selection. What Michael, Shuerholz, Hart and Gillick knew that Beane has yet to 'discover' or purloin, is that a player's 'make-up'--his character and ability to perform under pressure--is a vital concomitant to the raw statistics. But, this oversite by Beane is not surprising, as Lewis reveals Beane to be a socio-pathically self-absorbed, manish-boy without respect for, nor even cognizance of, what really produced three solid seasons for the also-ran A's: Zito, Mulder & Hudson. I read page after page waiting for the author or someone to tell Beane, The Emporer, that he was naked. He had yet to win any rings, and without high character, clutch players to carry out his statistical holy grail he would remain alone shivering in October for want of a unearned garment.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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