Customer Reviews for

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

17 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

A Whole New Way of Looking at Baseball Statistics

Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis...
Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis is a very entertaining writer, at times laugh out loud funny, who has turned what could have been a very dry subject into a real page turner. I read this in one day, which is unusual for me with non-fiction. Highly recommended, especially in the dead of winter when the beginning of baseball season seems so far away.

posted by tsmom1219 on May 14, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Moneyball

The author got caught up describiNG tHE mind numbiNG statistics used in major league baseball I found myself skipplng pages to get to the part about the players

posted by Anonymous on December 30, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2012

    Play ball

    Good story, well written and an entertaining intro to baseball stats.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2012

    Hmmmmmm?

    This book, which i understand is not a suspense, still needs something to keep the reader reading it with interest, great for a baseball fans and stats but to much extra detail and side notes. Very very little dialogue. Also i read the blind side (by Michael Lewis as well) was written the same way. But was not terrible. Just needs more intrest build up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Movie is boring

    Soooooooooo bpring.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2012

    Age?

    Is this an adult book or can middle schoolers read it???

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 27, 2011

    Good book if you are looking for an Iconolast look at "Managment Style"

    If you have more than a passive interest in baseball and wonder about all the money being payed on players of questionable value (Alfonso Soriano, etc) then this is the book for you. It pushes the quotation of "It isn't the amount of money spent, its what you get" even further. It proposes the fact that there are a bunch of players out there that can win with a specific skill set. Put enough of them together and you will. No matter if you agree or not, it will make you think.

    I found it a great read.

    Ray Olson

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  • Posted October 31, 2011

    A good read...

    Occasionally seems to jump around, but all in all an interesting view of the strategy of a small market club making the most of its assets. It also helps that they had Zito, Mulder, and Hudson.

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  • Posted September 20, 2011

    Too Many Drawn Out Parts

    The book is really good when it talks about the players and people, but the statisical information is too drawn out and boring. Less information on the history of the stats would have made it a better read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2006

    Wow - Beane has zero World Series Championships

    Good book that should have an alternate title such as 'Moneyball: or How the A's Will Never Win A World Series'. Or how about just simply, 'Loserball'. Why would anyone think A's fans will continue to be ecstatic about 100-win seasons that lead to wild-card chokes?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2003

    Eloquent, but Incomplete

    Lewis deserves kudos for taking the arcane subject of baseball statistics and scouting and attempting to create a compelling narrative from them. For most of the first half of the book, which focuses on personalities (Oakland GM Billy Beane, Sabermetician Bill James) he succeeds. Then the book just runs out of steam. In the end, there really is no narrative to move the book forward and the more Lewis writes about baseball, the more his naivete shows through - he is far too accepting of the approach advocated by Beane and James, which he accepts without question, and there is a significant air of jock sniffing throughout; Lewis is clearly enthralled by his proximity to Beane and to major league players. And of course, the only real way to judge Beane and the others is through a larger sample, not the season and a half Lewis bases his worshipful stance on. Like Jane Leavy's Sandy Koufax book, this has far more appeal to the intelligent reader who knows little baseball, or the casual fan, than the hardcore, who will enjoy it throughout but spend much time, as I did, finding the holes. To paraphrase, Lewis has obvious tools that are not backed up by his stats.

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    Posted January 17, 2012

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    Posted September 21, 2011

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    Posted August 7, 2011

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    Posted September 6, 2010

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    Posted December 11, 2012

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    Posted November 16, 2011

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    Posted November 29, 2011

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    Posted February 19, 2011

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    Posted January 26, 2011

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    Posted April 12, 2012

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