Customer Reviews for

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

17 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

A Whole New Way of Looking at Baseball Statistics

Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis...
Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis is a very entertaining writer, at times laugh out loud funny, who has turned what could have been a very dry subject into a real page turner. I read this in one day, which is unusual for me with non-fiction. Highly recommended, especially in the dead of winter when the beginning of baseball season seems so far away.

posted by tsmom1219 on May 14, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Moneyball

The author got caught up describiNG tHE mind numbiNG statistics used in major league baseball I found myself skipplng pages to get to the part about the players

posted by Anonymous on December 30, 2011

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  • Posted April 22, 2013

    Ready to be inside baseball? Moneyball takes you there, a book a

    Ready to be inside baseball? Moneyball takes you there, a book about the low budget Oakland Athletics and what they do to compete in a
     very expensive market, this includes their weird way of getting players and also their way of recruiting players. Michael Lewis does a great
     job of getting the facts. He also made me feel like I was there in all of the stressful moments, which there were a lot of. During the book
     you realize how much appearance mattered over raw skill of players which is just ludicrous in my mind. But this book also took you
     inside the mind of Billy Beane and Paul DePodesta which is another reason that I loved the book. Being a baseball player myself I
    found the book to be very interesting, because of some of Billy's philosophies like how little defense mattered as long as you score runs,
     but what if you give up 10 runs a game? We will see how Oakland turns out this year. I recommend this book to people from preteens to
     adults, if you love baseball this is the book for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2013

    Even Better than movie

    Amazing book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Thoroughly enjoyed

    Highly readable and sometimes humerous look at baseball culture and an attemot to change it.

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  • Posted December 15, 2012

    "Moneyball" is a facinating look into the life of one

    "Moneyball" is a facinating look into the life of one of the game's most brilliant (and volatile) general managers, Billy Beane. The author basically goes into detail on how Billy's mind works and how he was able to assemble one of the winningest teams in baseball history - with one of the lowest payrolls in all of baseball. The most important thing I learned from the book is that in order to be successful in leadership, you need to have the perfect balance of wisdom, passion and experience. There are several Beane wannabes in the world of baseball (I'm thinking specifically of Dan O'Dowd of the Colorado Rockies) who can copy the wisdom by using sabermetrics, but fail miserably at their jobs because they lack the passion for the game and have never been a player. Beane has it all. A great book that teaches how to beat bigger and richer competition. My only warning would be that it may be a little too "inside baseball" for the casual reader...but a must read for baseball fanatics.

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  • Posted November 25, 2012

    I love this book! I am a huge baseball fan and this tells all ab

    I love this book! I am a huge baseball fan and this tells all about what the A's did in 2002. How they went on there 20 game win streak, how Billy Beane is one of the best GM's of all time. If you like baseball this is a must read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    Fantastic if you love baseball and math

    One of my favorite books

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2012

    Moneyball

    Wow this is a good book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    First class writing+very unusual topic

    Moneyball is not a usual sports book, as it is about the efficient management of professional baseball teams rather than action in the sport itself. The writing is exceellent andmaintains interest through the in-depth biographical and topical research, giving real depth to thecharacters and background to help the reader through the extensive discussion of tactics and statistics. A very enjoyable and enlightening read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2012

    A must read for any baseball fanatic!

    If you like baseball even a little tiny bit.

    Read Moneyball.

    Agree or disagree, love or hate, no matter where on the spectrum you fall. This book will make you expand and question your beliefs and opinions of how our national pass time should be structured.

    And isn't that what reading is all about?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2012

    Good GR GREAT MOVIE BUT THE BOOK IS BETTER

    I liked the movie and the book is great. Its about the financial crisis of the Oakland Athletics. Great acting in the movie by Jonah Hill and Brad Pitt, but I recomend the book over the movie. Overall, fantastic book for anyone who is into buissness. You dont even have to like baseball to like this book!




    ?







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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Tased like pizza

    Yummy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    Hi

    I like it

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    Efd

    Frerrer

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2012

    Thumbs up

    Great book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    Great book

    Very interesting how a different way of thinking led to success. Its a shame they never won the worfld series, as that is what critics always point to. But to keep getting the As into the Playoffs is all u can do as a GM. One clutch hit and they should have beat the Yanks multiple times.

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  • Posted March 13, 2012

    See the Movie - Read the Book

    Great book if you are baseball fan a must read. Glad I read the book after seeing the movie. It sure explained a lot of the movie to me. Highly recommend but if you are not a baseball fan and don't like statistics, stay away.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    AMAZING!!!!

    This is my favorite sports book i have ever read. I recomend for any baseball fan to read it.

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  • Posted March 8, 2012

    Moneyball was the greatest story I have read. It’s about B

    Moneyball was the greatest story I have read. It’s about Billy Beane, a general manager for the Oakland A’s. A small market team that somehow made it to the American league championship series. Playing the New York Yankees the athletics loose to them and their season is over. They made it that far because of their 3 all-star players. Damon, Giambi, and Isringhausen. The large market teams saw these players potential and grabbed them for their team. Billy then goes to make off season trades and meets peter brand. A Yale graduate that studied economics and he introduces a brand new idea to the game. Basically the idea is to get players on base in order to score them and win games. Billy gets players to fill that role despite what everyone is telling him. Then the coach of the athletics plays the players he thinks is the best for the team. Which in fact its not. They are in dead last playing these players and billy can not get the guys he wants to play, to play. So he trades the players that the coach is playing so his players can play. And what do you know the athletics go on to break the longest win streak record. Then make it to the same place they were last year. The playoffs. The same thing happens they are eliminated before they get to the world series. During the off season again. Billy receives a general manager offer from the Boston red sox. Their offer will make him the highest paid general manager in sports. But he turns the deal down. The story leaves why he turns the deal down to the reader. I think a major message from this movie is don’t make a decision based on money. Billy did right out of high school and turned down a full ride to Stanford. The mets then dropped him and he became a general manager. Then he was offered a lot of money to manage for a big team and he learned from his lesson of making a decision about money and stayed in Oakland. I didn’t like the equations and numbers, they were really confusing. I loved the way billy is told as a leader. He re-invented the game and got a ton of criticism for it but he stuck to his idea and didn’t change it for nobody and it all worked out for him. I also love the new perspective it gave me of the sport. Ive never thought of baseball from a number standpoint. Someone should read this book because it’s a inspirational story and lets everybody know that sometimes standing out is a good thing. 10/10

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 7, 2012

    Moneyball Book Review

    One of the greatest underdog stories of all time. The creation of the 2002 Oakland Athletics and how they came about winning 101 games with a payroll of $41 million. Compared too much richer teams such as the New York Yankees, whose payroll topped at $125 million that season is quite unbelievable. You don’t need to be a baseball fan to appreciate the way Billy Beane assembled a winning team with such a limited budget. With great players like Jason Giambi, Johnny Damon, and Jason Isringhausen leaving to other teams for the big bucks due to free agency, it was Billy Beane’s job as General Manager to fill those voids. Moneyball, an admirable tale written with such simplicity, but yet with such great suspense must be credited to the author Michael Lewis. Michael Lewis was born in New Orleans. He attended Princeton and received a Bachelors Arts degree in Art History in 1982. He also wrote the novel Blind Side that became an immediate best seller. The Blind Side was also made into an academy award winning film similar to Moneyball. Lewis’ phenomenal storytelling and style truly compels readers to keep on reading. His articulate description of characters physical and mental traits, allows us as readers to paint a picture with the words Lewis uses. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this novel because of the uniqueness brought from Michael’s writing. The ability to write about baseball knowledge and statistics while also continuing to develop the story of the 2002 Oakland A’s feats is remarkable. It all starts with Billy Beane. He was the man in charge of everything. Well, almost everything, besides the payroll, which was decided by how much money the owner had and was willing to spend. In this case the owner wasn’t looking to spend what the big city teams were throwing out there on free agents. The owner wanted the organization to be run more like a business where they would profit from paying players less than their so called value and create revenue. The A’s were left with multiple of their best players changing teams for the money that they had the right to seek after because their current contracts with the A’s had run out and they could not afford to keep them. But it was Beane’s job to find these undervalued players through draft and free agency in order to succeed. Billy Beane’s obsession for success is shown in different stages in his life throughout the book. At first when he was in high school. He was a highly sought after prospect that didn’t come along very often. A big, strong, fast five tool player that could do it all and everyone wanted on their team at the next level. The big question was is he going to go to college and get an education or jump right into the draft and try to make it in the big leagues. He was so intelligent he even had a full ride to Stanford on a football and baseball scholarship. The scouts would be at every practice and game of his all of high school drooling over the intangibles he possessed to be a star. Billy never knew what failure was. Throughout his life anytime he didn’t succeed it was hard for him to grasp. No one wanted to be near him on the bench after he struck out because it was a guarantee bats would be broken and helmets would be slung in anger. Moneyball is a must read for anyone interested in an all time great novel. If your a casual baseball fan or don’t like baseball at all, I can assure you will enjoy Michael Lewis’ writing and story telling.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    Excellent read for any baseball fan.

    Better than the movie.

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