Customer Reviews for

Moscow Rules (Gabriel Allon Series #8)

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

engaging spy thriller

Art restorer Alessio Vianelli also known in some secretive circles as Israeli master-spy Gabriel Allon is on his honeymoon with his second wife Chiara in Umbria when his friend and undercover associate Uzi Navot meets with him at an Assisi, Italy restaurant. Uzi, a sen...
Art restorer Alessio Vianelli also known in some secretive circles as Israeli master-spy Gabriel Allon is on his honeymoon with his second wife Chiara in Umbria when his friend and undercover associate Uzi Navot meets with him at an Assisi, Italy restaurant. Uzi, a senior official for the Israel secret intelligence service, informs Gabriel that Russian arms dealer Ivan Kharkov is selling weapons to al-Qaeda. The assumption is obvious that a planned major terrorist attack is forthcoming, but none of the western espionage agents knows which cell or where. Gabriel insists on investigating. ---- The tip came from inside Moscow as Ivan¿s wife Elena warned the west. Gabriel believes she is the only avenue to who specifically her spouse is selling the weapons to she must be recruited in order for her to obtain Kharkov's ledger sheet. Unknown to Gabriel and his associates is that the former Russian Colonel and his associates have grandiose schemes to return Russia to its Soviet Empire glory days and thanks to western, Chinese, and Indian thirst for oil, money is no longer an obstacle. ---- The Allon counterespionage series is one of the best spy thriller sagas on the market today however his latest escapades in Moscow is fast-paced, but lacks the moral underpinnings that make the enemy seem human. Perhaps it is because MOSCOW RULES follows the fantastic THE SECRET SERVANT, which placed the spy thriller quality bar at stratospheric levels especially with the extraordinary explanation on how a person metamorphosis into a terrorist. In spite a shaky ending, Daniel Silva¿s tale showcases a different no longer bleak Moscow in which oil money and America¿s economic woes has made many think they can revisit and win the Cold War especially influential ruthless former military colonels. ---- Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on December 9, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Good guy Gabriel

Artist/not-so-secret agent Gabriel Allon is lured from his idyllic Umbria honeymoon by a request for a "small favor" from his mentor/father surrogate, former head of the Mussad. The favor turns out to be lethal. Although the mission that develops is a crucial one, invol...
Artist/not-so-secret agent Gabriel Allon is lured from his idyllic Umbria honeymoon by a request for a "small favor" from his mentor/father surrogate, former head of the Mussad. The favor turns out to be lethal. Although the mission that develops is a crucial one, involving covert arms sales and global terrorism, Gabriel has learned to subjugate what his heart tells him in order to do what he deems right. Somehow, Moscow Rules is missing the edge that all previous Allon novels have offered. While there is menace and violence to spare, Gabriel himself seems to be going through the paces because, well, that's what he does. The villain of the piece, Ivan Kharkov, seems a caricature designed to personify all the tyrannical elements that persist even in modern Russia, and his wife, who rats him out, doesn't come across as strong or committed enough to fulfill her mission. Nevertheless, I'd rather read a Silva covert-ops novel than one by virtually anyone else writing today, and Moscow isn't bad, simply not quite as sharp as its predecessors.

posted by katknit on June 11, 2009

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    engaging spy thriller

    Art restorer Alessio Vianelli also known in some secretive circles as Israeli master-spy Gabriel Allon is on his honeymoon with his second wife Chiara in Umbria when his friend and undercover associate Uzi Navot meets with him at an Assisi, Italy restaurant. Uzi, a senior official for the Israel secret intelligence service, informs Gabriel that Russian arms dealer Ivan Kharkov is selling weapons to al-Qaeda. The assumption is obvious that a planned major terrorist attack is forthcoming, but none of the western espionage agents knows which cell or where. Gabriel insists on investigating. ---- The tip came from inside Moscow as Ivan¿s wife Elena warned the west. Gabriel believes she is the only avenue to who specifically her spouse is selling the weapons to she must be recruited in order for her to obtain Kharkov's ledger sheet. Unknown to Gabriel and his associates is that the former Russian Colonel and his associates have grandiose schemes to return Russia to its Soviet Empire glory days and thanks to western, Chinese, and Indian thirst for oil, money is no longer an obstacle. ---- The Allon counterespionage series is one of the best spy thriller sagas on the market today however his latest escapades in Moscow is fast-paced, but lacks the moral underpinnings that make the enemy seem human. Perhaps it is because MOSCOW RULES follows the fantastic THE SECRET SERVANT, which placed the spy thriller quality bar at stratospheric levels especially with the extraordinary explanation on how a person metamorphosis into a terrorist. In spite a shaky ending, Daniel Silva¿s tale showcases a different no longer bleak Moscow in which oil money and America¿s economic woes has made many think they can revisit and win the Cold War especially influential ruthless former military colonels. ---- Harriet Klausner

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2008

    Great Spy Thriller

    Silva has written another great spy thriller, demonstrating that today's dangerous world provides plenty of fiction fodder for those that like their chills served up in large doses.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2008

    A great thrill ride

    Silva's Gabriel Allon books are must reads for fans of good spy novels. This is the strongest yet, but I highly recommend the previous books in the series, all of which are good. I'm just sad that I will now have to wait for a year for Silva to write another one, as I knocked this one off in a day.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Intelligent writing....love it!

    This is the third novel featuring Gabriel Allon that I've read. I found the first in Heathrow during a long wait the day after that crazy doctor failed in his bombing attempt with his SUV full of explosives there in London. Maybe because of the situation, I fell immediately in love with Gabriel Allon and his cause.

    Silva's research is fantastic. I loved reading the explanation and thanks at the end of Moscow Rules. He puts so much work into his novels. It really pays off, and the intelligent reader of fiction will certainly appreciate his efforts. Though Allon is the consummate spy, he doesn't speak Russian nor know a very lot about the history and people other than the interactions between the Russian government and his own. He knows about the Russian arms dealers, but his lack of Russian language really works to give him a more human feel. Of course, so does the ending, but I wouldn't dream of spoiling it for the next reader!

    Moscow Rules, and others in the series, are intense. I like to make sure I have ample time to process the twists and turns of the story line, so I read them on a weekend without my six year old, when flying, or whenever I know I can have some time for thought to process the story. Moscow Rules was especially intriguing because of the Russian culture and history in the story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 3, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    AWESOME AND WORTH THE TIME

    I picked this book up randomly one day and boy am I glad I did. I couldn't put it down. This series has the most amazing, creative, unique characters and story line that I have found outside classic mystery series like Sherlock Holmes. Thank you Daniel Silva for writing this and the many adventures so far for Gabriel, you have truly entertained and educated me!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The book has made me wanting to become a spy !!!

    i love the way the author describes the characters in detail which really makes a big difference to the execution of the whole story. the detailing is a treat to the readers' visual senses and makes you feel as if the story is being enacted in front of you.

    an edge of the seat novel which swings you to different levels of emotions. the storytelling is fantastic making the reader wanting to be there to kill the bad guys..

    i loved the book and will definitely read more books by the author..

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 8, 2010

    Another fine read from Silva

    I've read several of Daniel Silva's books. All are very good, and so is this one. It is a fine, fast-paced thriller. He's one of the best of this genre, in my view. Read it; you'll like it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 3, 2010

    Another Easy Read

    Daniel Silva does another great job of combining a good modern day story with
    bits of humor. Many times in books that make up a series you tire of the characters. With Gabriel Allon and the lot this is not the case. I read all kinds of Spy novels by different authors and Daniel Silva has become my favorite.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2010

    Allon at his best

    Gabriel Allon is what one would call the master of instant justice. Sometimes you wish the characters were true. The plot is developed at such a pace that you have a difficult time putting the book down. Good guys win! How different is that from reality?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2009

    Great book!

    Loved reading this book,every page great.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 19, 2009

    LOVE Silva's books....

    Better read A Death in Viena before you read this one to follow the story. Love his books! Hope he comes up with a lot more....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Good guy Gabriel

    Artist/not-so-secret agent Gabriel Allon is lured from his idyllic Umbria honeymoon by a request for a "small favor" from his mentor/father surrogate, former head of the Mussad. The favor turns out to be lethal. Although the mission that develops is a crucial one, involving covert arms sales and global terrorism, Gabriel has learned to subjugate what his heart tells him in order to do what he deems right. Somehow, Moscow Rules is missing the edge that all previous Allon novels have offered. While there is menace and violence to spare, Gabriel himself seems to be going through the paces because, well, that's what he does. The villain of the piece, Ivan Kharkov, seems a caricature designed to personify all the tyrannical elements that persist even in modern Russia, and his wife, who rats him out, doesn't come across as strong or committed enough to fulfill her mission. Nevertheless, I'd rather read a Silva covert-ops novel than one by virtually anyone else writing today, and Moscow isn't bad, simply not quite as sharp as its predecessors.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 15, 2014

    Another exciting novel from the spy-master, Daniel Silva.  Mosco

    Another exciting novel from the spy-master, Daniel Silva.  Moscow Rules has our hero Gabriel Allon back in action.  This time he's in Moscow where he's brutalized and told not to come back. But Moscow is where he must return to stop one of the most powerful arms dealers in the world from delivering the deadly weapons to al-Qaeda.  The twists and turns in this non-stop action thriller were exhausting, but I hope to recover in time to read Silva's next novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 16, 2014

    If you enjoy being on the edge of your chair this is the book for you.

    I like to read a series in order so began with The Killing Artist and have read these in order. I am always sorry for one book to end, but can hardly wait for the next one. Very exciting writer.

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  • Posted December 27, 2013

    Good, but could have been much better.

    As the Gabriel Allon series progresses, it's only natural to see characters develop more fully than a single appearance in a one-time novel would allow. This seemed to happen since the beginning of the series, but, in my opinion, has now stalled. Although time is allotted for more character development, the reader is really only presented the characters as they have been before. In wanting to treat the characters better, the author uses a lot of words to set up a scene or an impending action but accomplishes not much more than the set-up itself. Although as a reader I am not put off by an ending that leaves some matters "hanging" (and this book does, allowing for a future for the bad and the good), I feel this book got to a point where the author said, "OK. I'm done. Let's end it and go to press."
    I also had the thought as I read about the mental and physical condition of Allon as the book ended, that he learns nothing from past experiences -- though that would not allow, I guess, for anything more than full retirement and the end of the series. All in all, if you like this author and his characters (as I surely do), the disappointments are outweighed by the plot that is all to much a reality for these times.

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  • Posted August 30, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Moscow Rules by Daniel Silva is the eighth in the Gabriel Allon

    Moscow Rules by Daniel Silva is the eighth in the Gabriel Allon series. Even though there are numer­ous ref­er­ences to the pre­vi­ous books, I thought this novel was still a good read and could be read independently.

    Gabriel Allon and his new wife, Chiara, are on their hon­ey­moon in Umbria, Italy. But Gabriel never stops work­ing and is restor­ing a paint­ing for the Vat­i­can. A Russ­ian news­pa­per reporter con­tacts the Israeli embassy in Rome request­ing a meet­ing with Allon who reluc­tantly agrees.

    The meet­ing never hap­pens and Allon is thrown into the world of Russ­ian busi­ness­man, Euro­pean pol­i­tics, arms deal­ers and the mix of old ene­mies with new money.

    Moscow Rules by Daniel Silva is another solid, well-written and depend­able adven­ture in the Gabriel Allon chronicles.

    After read­ing the 8th book in the series it is obvi­ous that Silva has cre­ated a char­ac­ter that is strong, sub­tle and con­flicted with an inter­est­ing back­ground story and engag­ing future. At this point in his life, Allon and the read­ers aren’t really sure what he is. Allon is too old to be the James Bond style agent, too young to retire, too cyn­i­cal to take a desk job but he is a patriot in every bone in his body and is still able to contribute.

    Silva real­ize that he can’t keep his spy young for­ever and basi­cally ruined his spy­ing career in sev­eral books prior by hav­ing his face splashed across news­pa­pers and Euro­pean agen­cies not allow­ing him entry into their coun­try. This time the ene­mies are Russ­ian oli­garchs and heavy handed pol­i­tics which seem to be a wel­comed depar­ture, yet still in the espi­onage genre.

    At first I wasn’t sure if I wanted to read Moscow Rules but I’m glad I did. Silva man­aged to find another adven­ture to our aging spy which is not laugh­able and keeps up with cur­rent events. The author does an excel­lent job explain­ing the cur­rent (or cur­rent when it was writ­ten) con­flicts in the for­mer USSR, as well as keep­ing up with his abil­ity to write peo­ple and char­ac­ters which keep the story mov­ing and are inter­est­ing to follow.

    The end­ing of the story did get tied up but the emo­tional aspects seemed to be tied up in a rushed way, a page or two more wouldn’t have hurt. Oth­er­wise I felt the book was nicely paced, a quick read and another excel­lent addi­tion to the excit­ing thrillers of the Allon repertoire.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2013

    Great book

    There isn't a book in the Gabriel Allon Series by Daniel Silva that has not been great. It's the kind of book that once started one cannot put down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    Moscow Rules

    I have read Moscow Rules, as well as all the "Gabriel Allon" series, and enjoyed them tremendously. I highly recommend Moscow Rules. It is entertaining as well as educational.

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  • Posted September 28, 2011

    Great Read

    I do most of my reading during the summer months when my schedule is less busy. Summer 2011: I discovered Daniel Silva and the Gabriel Allon series. I read all 11 books in a very short period of time. They are interesting and never a dull moment!

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  • Posted June 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Best+espionage+series+yet%21

    Truth+be+told+this+is+the+first+Gabriel+Allon+book+I+read+but+it+was+easy+to+jump+into+and+a+fantastic+read

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