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Moscow Rules (Gabriel Allon Series #8)

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

engaging spy thriller

Art restorer Alessio Vianelli also known in some secretive circles as Israeli master-spy Gabriel Allon is on his honeymoon with his second wife Chiara in Umbria when his friend and undercover associate Uzi Navot meets with him at an Assisi, Italy restaurant. Uzi, a sen...
Art restorer Alessio Vianelli also known in some secretive circles as Israeli master-spy Gabriel Allon is on his honeymoon with his second wife Chiara in Umbria when his friend and undercover associate Uzi Navot meets with him at an Assisi, Italy restaurant. Uzi, a senior official for the Israel secret intelligence service, informs Gabriel that Russian arms dealer Ivan Kharkov is selling weapons to al-Qaeda. The assumption is obvious that a planned major terrorist attack is forthcoming, but none of the western espionage agents knows which cell or where. Gabriel insists on investigating. ---- The tip came from inside Moscow as Ivan¿s wife Elena warned the west. Gabriel believes she is the only avenue to who specifically her spouse is selling the weapons to she must be recruited in order for her to obtain Kharkov's ledger sheet. Unknown to Gabriel and his associates is that the former Russian Colonel and his associates have grandiose schemes to return Russia to its Soviet Empire glory days and thanks to western, Chinese, and Indian thirst for oil, money is no longer an obstacle. ---- The Allon counterespionage series is one of the best spy thriller sagas on the market today however his latest escapades in Moscow is fast-paced, but lacks the moral underpinnings that make the enemy seem human. Perhaps it is because MOSCOW RULES follows the fantastic THE SECRET SERVANT, which placed the spy thriller quality bar at stratospheric levels especially with the extraordinary explanation on how a person metamorphosis into a terrorist. In spite a shaky ending, Daniel Silva¿s tale showcases a different no longer bleak Moscow in which oil money and America¿s economic woes has made many think they can revisit and win the Cold War especially influential ruthless former military colonels. ---- Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on December 9, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Good guy Gabriel

Artist/not-so-secret agent Gabriel Allon is lured from his idyllic Umbria honeymoon by a request for a "small favor" from his mentor/father surrogate, former head of the Mussad. The favor turns out to be lethal. Although the mission that develops is a crucial one, invol...
Artist/not-so-secret agent Gabriel Allon is lured from his idyllic Umbria honeymoon by a request for a "small favor" from his mentor/father surrogate, former head of the Mussad. The favor turns out to be lethal. Although the mission that develops is a crucial one, involving covert arms sales and global terrorism, Gabriel has learned to subjugate what his heart tells him in order to do what he deems right. Somehow, Moscow Rules is missing the edge that all previous Allon novels have offered. While there is menace and violence to spare, Gabriel himself seems to be going through the paces because, well, that's what he does. The villain of the piece, Ivan Kharkov, seems a caricature designed to personify all the tyrannical elements that persist even in modern Russia, and his wife, who rats him out, doesn't come across as strong or committed enough to fulfill her mission. Nevertheless, I'd rather read a Silva covert-ops novel than one by virtually anyone else writing today, and Moscow isn't bad, simply not quite as sharp as its predecessors.

posted by katknit on June 11, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2008

    Fantasy rules

    Daniel Silva lives in a world of fantasy. He is not going to Moscow (as one of his readers pointed out) and he has never been there, nor is he aware of what is going on in Russia.<BR/>As for terrorism, Moscow has suffered not less that New York City from the terrorist attacks. By the way, it is one of the duties of the KGB to fight terrorism. <BR/>Maybe instead of making up stories Silva should learn something from the real sources of information.<BR/>The majority of people in Russia share the same concerns and have the same values as people in the US or anywhere in the world.<BR/>If you want to know about Russia read the books based on facts not sick imagination. There are many now in English by American and British journalists and not only.<BR/>As an example, "Red Moon Rising" by Matthew Brzezinsky describes the dramatic events of the Race in Space in the late 50's and early 60's, the events that actually did take place and are more exciting than fiction.

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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