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My Losing Season

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

Pat Conroy makes me jealous that I did not pursue basketball in high school. His passion for the sport bleeds through the writing in his memoir, My Losing Season. In fewer than four hundred pages, Conroy takes the reader through his life on the basketball court, focus...
Pat Conroy makes me jealous that I did not pursue basketball in high school. His passion for the sport bleeds through the writing in his memoir, My Losing Season. In fewer than four hundred pages, Conroy takes the reader through his life on the basketball court, focusing on senior season on the basketball team at the Citadel. Using varied flashbacks, Conroy does a game by game analysis of his final year on the hardwood. Each of these games follows a simple equation, including: a description of the size and talent of the opposing team, the place that they are playing, the captainship, the halftime speech, and the vain efforts of Mel Thompson to keep Pat from shooting. In the last two hundred and fifty pages, each game uses this combination of descriptions, but it somehow does not get repetitive. A different hero emerges from each game, and one person in particular surfaces as the hero of the Citadel¿s season. I found myself rooting for Pat and the Citadel as I read on. Both Conroy and the military school take on the underdog role both are undersized and do not have the talent to play with much more competitive teams. Instead, both work harder, hustle more, and have more heart than anyone they would face in their disappointing season. Pat Conroy symbolizes the tough, hard-nosed Citadel basketball team, and ultimately emerges as their hero. Only Conroy can write about himself as a hero without appearing to believe that he is above everyone else. He does this by building up unbelievable ethos: a sophomore starts over him for the first few games of his senior season he is the envy of his team as the captain even though he is not a starter, and he is the leader of the ¿greenie weenies¿, the benchwarmers. He quotes his coach, Mel Thompson, at the end of the novel as saying that Pat Conroy: ¿gets more mileage out of his talent than any player I have ever coached¿ (341). Conroy makes this quote especially meaningful by building up Mel as a terrible person throughout the book. Regardless, Pat Conroy¿s memoir gives perspective in the world of basketball to many.

posted by Anonymous on October 28, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Typical Conroy mediocre

An autobiographer should refrain from blowing his own horn about how wonderful he is. Conroy uses the Charleston newspaper in quotes to do it for him. It is also a bit tiresome how abused he was by his father. We read all about that in 'The Great Santini'. Alas,...
An autobiographer should refrain from blowing his own horn about how wonderful he is. Conroy uses the Charleston newspaper in quotes to do it for him. It is also a bit tiresome how abused he was by his father. We read all about that in 'The Great Santini'. Alas, Pat wants us to feel sorry for him again. He cannot seem to make up his mind if Mel Thompson was a terrible coach or just fair.

posted by Anonymous on December 24, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2007

    Typical Conroy mediocre

    An autobiographer should refrain from blowing his own horn about how wonderful he is. Conroy uses the Charleston newspaper in quotes to do it for him. It is also a bit tiresome how abused he was by his father. We read all about that in 'The Great Santini'. Alas, Pat wants us to feel sorry for him again. He cannot seem to make up his mind if Mel Thompson was a terrible coach or just fair.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Maybe, if you love basketball ...

    Too much basketball, and most of the rest has been told in previous books in one form or another. I'm a huge Conroy fan, but I'm not a fan of this book. I found it pretty boring.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2010

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    Posted October 24, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2010

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