Customer Reviews for

The Name of the Rose

Average Rating 4
( 117 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Fantastic book, but sloppy nook transfer of map images

This is an excellent book, but I feel it useful to provide editing feedback in this early stage of eBooks. The maps of the abbey and the library are poorly transferred to the eBook format. In both cases, only the upper left corner of each of these maps are visible on ...
This is an excellent book, but I feel it useful to provide editing feedback in this early stage of eBooks. The maps of the abbey and the library are poorly transferred to the eBook format. In both cases, only the upper left corner of each of these maps are visible on the BN nook. This does not seriously detract from this fantastic novel, but I was disappointed by the seeming lack of effort to format these images appropriately for the nook.

posted by DrJimC on January 3, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Try to make it past 1st 100 pages!

This book is definitely hard to get into. Even Eco comments in his notes in the back that his friends and editor suggested lightening up the first 100 pages or so. I found myself lost in the different monk factions and their political agendas which, while interesting,...
This book is definitely hard to get into. Even Eco comments in his notes in the back that his friends and editor suggested lightening up the first 100 pages or so. I found myself lost in the different monk factions and their political agendas which, while interesting, were a bit 'thick' to get through. Yes, some of this was critical to understanding the characters' motivations, but it could have been done in such a way as to be less 'plodding'. Once I made it past that, it was an enjoyable read. So,if you undertake this book, don't be discouraged by the beginning!

posted by Anonymous on February 6, 2006

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  • Posted November 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A thriller that will surprise you

    In the year 1327, Brother William of Baskerville is assigned an investigation of a possible heresy in a wealthy Italian Abbey, Abbaye de la Source, somewhere between Pompeii and Passy. The Novel is narrated by a young Benedictine novice and William's assistant, Adso of Melk. The story occurs in seven days of 1327, and the chapters are related to the daily monastic life of a Benedictine convent's canonical hours: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, Nones, Vespers, and Compline. The book is 503 pages long, so it comes to around 72 pages/day. The religious bacground is ruled by the protagonists Pope John XXII (1249 - December 4, 1334), born Jacques Duèze (or d'Euse), who was pope from 1316 to 1334. He was the second Pope of the Avignon Papacy. (1309-1377), elected by a conclave in Lyon assembled by Philip V of France. Like his predecessor, Clement V, he centralized power and income in the Papacy, living a princely life in Avignon and spending a lot of money for his court and his wars. The Pope opposed Louis IV of Bavaria as emperor, and Louis, in turn invaded Italy, and set up an antipope, Nicholas V. Pope John XXII had set a a constitution concerning the taxae sacrae poenitentiariae in which the pope exploited the sins of the religious in order to squeeze out more money by creating the indulgence. However the Franciscans had a vow of poverty and opposed this doctrine, thus the Pope wanted to declare them heretics because the Franciscan belief was not good for his business. So William of Baskerville arrives to the Abbaye de la Source to see if a mediation is possible between the two factions, since there is a suspicion that some of the members of the abbey are against the indulgences. His mission is overshadowed by a series of bizarre deaths and accusations of homosexuality between certain monks-so Brother William, aided by Adso, turn detectives. Their mission now is to find the killer before the two factions: the Italians who believe in the vow of poverty, and the French who want to continue the practice of indulgence arrive for a meeting to consider a compromise. William's tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon-all sharpened to a glistened edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity. William collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where the most interesting things happen at night. His foes are secrecy, religious rules and a secret desire to guard the library-for only the librarian can control the knowledge that leaves the convent. It is no accident that the book starts out as a mystery and continues to deceive the reader until the climactic end-until the reader realizes that this is a mystery in which very little is discovered and the good detective is defeated. It is no accident, either, that the book should have been edited-it contains long didactic passages that even the book editors requested be edited out. The author's explanation for boring you too death with them is that if somebody wanted to enter the abbey and live there for seven days-he had to accept the abbey's slow pace. Therefore there are several hundred pages that are purposely left as a penance or an initiation. Unfortunately for us, the readers, the penance is almost all the way to the end-until we discover that the historical premise and the crimes had nothing to do with the book. But rather it was a theologic

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 1999

    Astonishing!

    Umberto Eco knows how to creat great atmospheres, how to thrill the reader, and most of all, how to write. The most amazing is how easily he pulls a fiction story out of History. Simply amazing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    A fun romp in the 14th century, especially for Sherlock Holmes fans

    I've so enjoyed reading this book! Multiple deaths and secrecy in a monastery intersect with political intrigue. Throw in an astute ex-inquisitor and his scribe - definitely following the tradition of Holmes and Watson. This is not a fast run through mystery solving, but a calculated path with plenty of obstacles. If you enjoyed "The Valley of Fear" (Arthur Conan Doyle), you will probably enjoy this work as well.

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