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Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 7 of 4 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2006

    Natural Capitalism - China's Future | America's ???

    Just this morning I was watching Cashin' In on Fox News. One hot topic was how Oil / Energy prices not only affect gas prices, but ripple across the entire economy - creating potentially deadly inflation. The fact is, our oil addiction is 1) consuming non-renewable resources, and 2) polluting the air, water, and land all around us. This cannot continue for long without irreversible effects on the world. // Fortunately change is in the air and Natural Capitalism points out that 'a new type of industrialism' will not only save the environment, it will be more efficient - creating profits and jobs. Although many of the authors' visions seem utopian, I'm led to believe they will in fact come true. Consider China, faced with serious environmental problems and otherwise unsustainable growth, is embarking on a Circle of Life endeavor to create environmental programs to process and full recycle products/ by-products from cradle to grave - and all over again in an infinite circle. // Natural Capitalism sweeps across the entire environmental spectrum. The authors present a compelling case for saving the environment and continued economic progress. Using radically less material and energy will pose new competitive advantages that will leave otherwise clueless competitors far behind. // In the spirit of unleashing innovation, the authors attack the status quo mindset. Change won't happen because of economic fundamentals - wrong. Change will happen because of economic reasons. In many cases, energy savings alone justify investing in creating sustainable products and using sustainable energy sources. // Pollution is one factor affecting the health of billions world-wide. Natural Capitalism is an opportunity area that's picking up speed. The question is - when will it be too late. You need to strike while the iron is hot - and it's hot right now.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2002

    Life Supporting Literature Not To Late

    This is a book that should be read by all major international corporations, members of the middle -to- lower class can only afford to plant their little gardens and dispose of house hold waste correctly (if even that).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2000

    Natural Capitalism on the Money

    This important book can take its place alongside such touchstone volumes as 'Future Shock,' 'Megatrends ' and 'The New New.' The authors describe in vivid detail how business and industry can gain competitive advantage through a new business model based on doing much more with much less. The authors set out to prove that changing realities of the information economy and global competitiveness are already transforming industry and commerce in ways unforeseen even a few years ago. The new business model takes into account the values of all forms of 'capital' including human, manufactured, financial, and natural. 'Natural Capitalism' starts with an elegantly simple premise: economies need no longer be based on the idea that human capital is finite and natural resources are infinitely abundant when the obvious truth of the 21st Century is exactly the opposite. Theirs is not merely a detailed updating of Buckminster Fuller's 'small is beautiful' thesis. Rather, the authors describe a step-by-step process of business restructuring that should result in more efficiency at the corporate, national and global level. Such a process, if carried out across several industries simultaneously, would make it much easier for governments to promote social equity and conserve or even restore the natural ecosystems reaching across traditional borders. 'Natural Capitalism' is not a 'gloom and doom, industry vs. the environment' anti-consumerism rant. Neither do the authors fall into the trap of proposing a Pollyanna hypothesis that begins with 'if only we could change our basic cultural values.' Lovins, Lovins and Hawken make elegant use of facts and examples from several industrial sectors and actual case histories of large and small companies based in the US and overseas. What the Lovins and Hawken have given us with 'Natural Capitalism' is nothing less than an up-to-date business manual for the next century, complete with clear explanations and solid, real world examples. Their thinking finds common ground between business and environmental interests and makes the common sense case for how the two outlooks are merging into a new, practical, eco-friendly approach to making a profit. Just as business and civic leaders in Atlanta and elsewhere are redefining how sprawling cities should grow, 'Natural Capitalism' redefines how businesses and ultimately the entire planet should grow to sustain a prosperous and equitable quality of life for the indefinite future.

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    Posted August 29, 2009

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    Posted January 10, 2010

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