Customer Reviews for

Nausea

Average Rating 4
( 20 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2003

    The all-pervasive truth of existence, Nausea

    An amazing work of art that transforms the very heart of life. Sartre brilliantly paints a picture of man taken to his simplest form, of a man conscious of his existence and searching for his very essence, only to find the horrific and obscure truth of life; that being that we exist, nothing else, at the culmination of his journey. Yes, in this moment I exist; I breathe in and out, transformed upon the expulsion of that very breath. Still, I exist, even though I am never truly myself again, that which I was now different and lost in the past: a being irrelevant in the ever-changing present. We struggle, desire, to be more, but still, we, like the trees, the rocks, and everything else, exist, living within this absurdity, this nothingness that envelops all. In fact, I am this nothingness but, at the same time, I am everything, for nothing exists without the qualifcation of its existence. I am everything and nothing, yet both at the same time, paradoxically speaking. This, is the truth of Sartre, and, 'Some of these days/ You'll miss me honey,' for now, I shall never be the same. Pure brilliance!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2003

    I exist today... Is that all there is?

    The Café Philosopher¿s first and finest work that points to or surmises his existential ideas in his later works. Nausea is indeed a "beautiful and hard as steel" philosophical novel that makes "people ashamed of their existence" or at least lures people to question "it." Nausea is a book "above existence... an adventure." It is Sartre¿s realization, masking himself behind his character Antoine Roquentin, that existence suddenly unveils itself as Nausea ¿ a frightful, obscene and naked disorderliness (127). Comparing or paralleling Sartre¿s "absurdity" of existence with Schopenhauer¿s "vanity" of existence is strikingly similar. Schopenhauer says, "The vanity of existence is revealed in the whole form existence assumes: in the infiniteness of time and space contrasted with the finiteness of the individual in both; in the fleeting present as the sole form in which actuality exists; in the contingency and relativity of all things; in continual becoming without being; in continual desire without satisfaction; in the continual frustration of striving of which life consists... That which has been no longer is; it as little exists as does that which has never been. But everything that is in the next moment has been. Thus, the most significant present has over the most significant past the advantage of actuality, which means that the former bears to the latter the relation of something to nothing... We suddenly exist, after having for countless millennia not existed..."

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2006

    Sartre's 'Nausea'

    After reading this novel for a philosophy class, and having to write a paper on the ideas expressed throughout, it is evident that Sartre's intentions were to incorporate his ideas through the counts of a fictional 'diary'. The novel seemed to have a consistent drag of emotions and expressions that really never stopped through the whole book. It was easy to get lost in translation of the text and documentarys of the charachter 'Roquentin'. The overwhelming expressions of the charachters emotions and feelings left me distraught and exhausted, while at the same time leaving me unfulfilled with the ending. Overall, brilliant writing on Sartre's part, but don't be looking for a feel good ending while reading Sartre's 'Nausea'.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 11, 2013

    Dean Goranites of the BookReviewersClub reviewed the book "

    Dean Goranites of the BookReviewersClub reviewed the book "Nausea" by Jean-Paul Sartre. This book is a blend of philosophy and existentialism, and portrays the belief that we are all singular people going through the process of life by ourselves. That it is our free will and our decisions that help dictate how our lives will go. "Nausea" is a work of fiction that walks the line between literature and philosophy.
    Dean said this book made him feel depressed. Most parts were very similar to Albert Camus's "The Stranger" but they didn't grip him nearly as much. In "The Stranger," every word seemed important, but in "Nausea," it was usually a paragraph or a sentence that would really hit home. While reading, he would tend stop for a second and reread something 3 or 4 times. Those times, he was usually impressed at how Sartre was able to come up with something he had always felt inside but was never able to vocalize. Or just maybe, he had never even thought about it enough to vocalize it - like it was a kind of subconscious feeling about the world he'd always had.
    All in all, Dean gave the book 3 stars since he felt it was worth reading all the way through, but he doubted he would read it again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    The rating is for the book itself. This is not a "new trans

    The rating is for the book itself. This is not a "new translation" so don't waste your money if you have an earlier New Directions Edition of this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    BAD

    hate it

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    good enough to steal.

    I haven't had the opportunity to read this book yet, despite the fact I ordered it, and received it in December. I let my brother barrow it since i was still reading another book. I never got my book back! He loved this book SO much that he would not part with it and bought me a new copy. He is currently rereading the book for the 3rd time. This is impressive for a book I bought on a whim and knew next to nothing about.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2007

    Book Review

    Nausea is the coolest Book ever!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2004

    nonsence

    This book is a sad and depressing account of human existance. I strongly dissagree with Sartre's philosophy however if you like the idea of living in a world without meaning this book is for you.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2009

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    Posted March 15, 2010

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    Posted July 20, 2009

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    Posted July 27, 2009

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    Posted April 5, 2011

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    Posted December 19, 2009

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    Posted June 20, 2011

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    Posted December 25, 2009

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    Posted June 17, 2009

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    Posted May 3, 2010

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    Posted February 1, 2011

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