Customer Reviews for

The Nearest Exit

Average Rating 4
( 59 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(22)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

a terrific complicated and purposely convoluted espionage thriller

Former master spy Milo Weaver is assigned to return to field work. He loathes the task as he is ordered to do something horrific for people who will throw him under the bus if there is a hint of scandal.

Apparently a mole is inside the agency. He or she must be pur...
Former master spy Milo Weaver is assigned to return to field work. He loathes the task as he is ordered to do something horrific for people who will throw him under the bus if there is a hint of scandal.

Apparently a mole is inside the agency. He or she must be purged before those in the cold are eliminated. Milo is to find the traitor and kill the traitor. The problem is no evidence surfaces inside the agency; only politicians taking credit and tossing blame. That is until he begins to unravel a double helix case of revenge, but by who remains unknown and the field threat imminent.

The return of The Tourist is a terrific complicated and purposely convoluted espionage thriller as even the identities of the agencies are murky. Weaver knows exactly the key traits of his superiors whom he detests and distrusts. These political desk jockey handler(s) make Lady Macbeth seem as if she lacks ambition as they will do anything including allowing field operatives to die to further their careers. Filled with a zillion suspects and multiple subplots, Weaver knows The Nearest Exit for a field agent is death.

Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on April 20, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

He Didn't Take The Right Exit

If this novel were 300 pages long, I would have said that it was exciting and full of intrigue, even if a bit convoluted and at times confusing. It surely deserved 4 stars for entertainment value.
But, the book, inexplicably, went on for another 100 pages, where the au...
If this novel were 300 pages long, I would have said that it was exciting and full of intrigue, even if a bit convoluted and at times confusing. It surely deserved 4 stars for entertainment value.
But, the book, inexplicably, went on for another 100 pages, where the author found more tedium as he felt the need to explain more than necessary. Perhaps he just liked his story so much that he couldn't quit. But, the last 100 pages wore me out, they didn't excite me, and I found myself looking for the nearest exit!

posted by KenCady on May 19, 2010

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  • Posted April 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    a terrific complicated and purposely convoluted espionage thriller

    Former master spy Milo Weaver is assigned to return to field work. He loathes the task as he is ordered to do something horrific for people who will throw him under the bus if there is a hint of scandal.

    Apparently a mole is inside the agency. He or she must be purged before those in the cold are eliminated. Milo is to find the traitor and kill the traitor. The problem is no evidence surfaces inside the agency; only politicians taking credit and tossing blame. That is until he begins to unravel a double helix case of revenge, but by who remains unknown and the field threat imminent.

    The return of The Tourist is a terrific complicated and purposely convoluted espionage thriller as even the identities of the agencies are murky. Weaver knows exactly the key traits of his superiors whom he detests and distrusts. These political desk jockey handler(s) make Lady Macbeth seem as if she lacks ambition as they will do anything including allowing field operatives to die to further their careers. Filled with a zillion suspects and multiple subplots, Weaver knows The Nearest Exit for a field agent is death.

    Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 12, 2011

    Not as good as the first one

    This book definitely picks up where the first one left off, but it does a lot of recapping so that someone could read this as a stand alone instead of a 2nd book in a series. I found it to be very repetitive and moved a lot slower than the first one in the series. I still finished it, and I did enjoy it, and I would even read the next one. But I think the reiteration of so much plot was a waste of space and probably unnecessary.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Enjoyable

    Read "The Tourist" first it too is a good book and it makes "The Nearest Exit" a good sequel. These two books are good for those who love espionage novels.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    He Didn't Take The Right Exit

    If this novel were 300 pages long, I would have said that it was exciting and full of intrigue, even if a bit convoluted and at times confusing. It surely deserved 4 stars for entertainment value.
    But, the book, inexplicably, went on for another 100 pages, where the author found more tedium as he felt the need to explain more than necessary. Perhaps he just liked his story so much that he couldn't quit. But, the last 100 pages wore me out, they didn't excite me, and I found myself looking for the nearest exit!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    Loved it


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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    SpyGal on May 6, 2012

    LOVED The Tourist, so was very excited about this one. A bit more complex and more foul language...the language, for such a compelling writer, was quite disappointing. Plot and storyline were great though! Was always anxious to read more each day!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    Recommended

    Good follow-up to "The Tourist".

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  • Posted May 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Spy Stuff

    Mr. Steinhauer can really weave a plot. The Tourist and this book are the only two of his books I've read and I can't wait to get my hands on the third book in the Milo Weaver Trilogy - whenever that may be. These books remind me of Bill Granger's "November Man" books - great characters, deep insight in to the darkest aspects of modern day espionage, and very believable. If you love SpyFi, you need these books on your shelf.

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  • Posted March 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Addition to the Series

    Book 2 in the Milo Weaver series

    The series focuses on the world of espionage and clandestine operations in the post 9-11 era. Although the author has provided some helpful background to jog ones memory and keep the pace moving smoothly reading the prequel "The Tourist" is a must to fully grasp the cleverness behind the plotting. You will soon discover that the novels are more than simple espionage thrillers; they also combine mystery, romance and horror without sacrificing action or suspense.

    The story begins where "The Tourist" ended. Milo Weaver is fighting to get back into action and regain his good stature with his employer, being a full-fledged "Tourist" (undercover agent) is his only mission in life. Everything goes well in proving his loyalty until he is assigned an unbelievable request: kidnap and murder a 15 year old girl. He kidnaps the girl but hesitates at murder thus leaving him in a dangerous position. Caught between his conscience and the orders of his powerful boss, Milo finds himself haunted by his profession, a world where truth and trust are but a blur. He is plunged into a maze of lies that takes him on an action packed roller-coaster ride till the end....He needs help....

    The complex central plot is embedded in a twisted mesh of sub-plots, a Pandora's Box of deceit and manipulation brilliantly conceived. "Tourists" are programmed to follow orders without question but Milo needs to know the deep routed reason behind his boss's request. He turns to his father, another powerful man for help and together they arrange a solution, a deception that is beyond belief.....The mystery deepens when Milo senses he is being shadowed....all this makes for an exciting adventure full of intrigue and international espionage....

    The brisk pacing and sharp dialogue enhance the plotting and paint a vivid picture of the underworld of espionage. The numerous characters are well represented, very motivated and task driven but run of the mill stereotyping sneaks in at times. The story becomes a tad challenging as it follows the different points of view of its characters back and forth in time, but is well worth the effort.

    This sequel is a great addition to Milo's escapades

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  • Posted June 8, 2010

    Nearest Exit

    a great sequel to The Tourist with if anything more twists and turns than that terrific story. I suggest reading TT first though it's not critical I guess. Read and enjoy.

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    Posted February 6, 2011

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    Posted August 11, 2010

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    Posted August 25, 2010

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