BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Next: The Future Just Happened

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2004

    this book sux

    i think this book showed that the author had no idea what he was doing. he was picking his nose and trying to write at the same time. i think that is stupid and he needs to try again. thank you

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2002

    Next: The Future Just Happened

    This writer needs to just sit back and be Tabitha Soren's husband. This book really struck me as "I have to write a follow-up to The New New Thing ..what other subject can I exploit?" He really is more negative than he needs to be. I thought journalists were supposed to be (or at least appear to be) unbiased! Keep the subject matter, take out his comments, and you've got a better book than you have here. Maybe the BBC should have just used their data to write their own book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2002

    Next: The Future Just Happened

    Michael Lewis found some really interesting people to talk to in his quest to characterize the social impacts of the internet. However, in almost every story, his elitist perspectives on the situations or motives of these people eclipsed most of my enjoyment. (A great is example is how brutal he is to Bill Joy.) On top of this, the thesis is pretty shaky at best and is not argued with any real evidence. The argument goes something like: the typically young outsiders rebel against the system only to make a new insider system to rebel against... lather, rinse, repeat. The anecdotes are supportive of this thesis, but he just doesn't back his ideas up with anything more than these admittedly amusing stories. I really would've preferred just reading the stories with less pontification and social commentary.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2001

    MONEY MONEY MONEY MONEY

    As good as his others. Entertaining look at the dot com debacle. Nice diversion from the other books I usually read. Worth the time out.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2001

    Lewis truly captures the Internet's social consequences

    Lewis continues to capture the social consequences of current public events in a highly readable fashion. As he did in Liar's Poker and others, he observes society at large and analyzes the inner workings of the most important ongoing changes. His writing gives great insight into the next 5-15 years of socio-economic development related to technology in the U.S..

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2001

    Great Insight into the changing internet.

    Through Michael Lewis' research, we can see that the internet is truly a Wild Wild West. No longer is it all about making money, but about expressing opinion and fighting the establishment, at least until the outside becomes the establishment.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2001

    The Best Book on the Social Implications of the Internet

    Old elites beware! Your time is up! Become the new elite today! That's the message of this intriguing, fascinating, and thought-provoking look at what's already happened on the Internet. I not only thought that this is the best book about the social effects of the Internet, I also think it is by far Michael Lewis's best work. This book deserves many more than five stars as a result. The original idea was simple. There are all of these people making a big splash on the Internet as individuals. Let's go meet them in person and find out what's really going on. Believe me, it's different from what you read in the newspapers or saw on television. With the aid of a researching crew from the BBC, Mr. Lewis found that the cutting edge of the Internet revolution was going on with 11-14 year olds. Soon, it will probably drift lower in age. Because the Internet lets you play on a equal footing and assume any identity you choose, youngsters with guts and quick minds can take on major roles. Usually, their parents have no clue until adults or major authority figures start arriving on their doorstep challenging what the youngster is doing or seeking personal advice. The core of the book revolves around the stories of Jonathan Lebed who used chat room commentaries to help drive his $8,000 stake into over $800,000 in less than three years, Marcus in Perris, California who became Askme.com's leading criminal law expert based on his watching of court TV shows, and Justin Frankel who became an important developer of Gnutella for filesharing while having trouble getting an education in school. Mr. Lewis makes the point that these youngsters weren't doing anything that their elders don't do in other forums. Yet the established authorities deeply resented and challenged them. Mr. Lewis suggests that the old elites 'get a life.' Their day is over. He uses the analogy of his father's refusal to adapt his law practice to the methods of personal injury lawyers using billboards and television ads to show this is how the existing elites always respond . . . by condemning and trying to ignore the new. At the same time, Mr. Lewis raises several important questions that will stay with you. After having been king of the hill for your 15 minutes of fame at 15, how will you feel about the rest of your life as an also-ran? His portrayal of Danny Hillis's project to create the 10,000 year clock captures that point very well. He also lampoons Bill Joy's arguments that the Unabomber had it right that we (the existing elites) need to constrain technology. The basic point is that economic and social effectiveness will rest on the foundation of how effective you can be rather than who you are, what degrees you have, what age you are, or who you know. In other words, the Internet has added another degree of leveling to our society. Surely, that's good. I'm a little more optimistic than Mr. Lewis about the implications. I think that many people will find the lower barriers to entry provide them the chance to develop themselves more than would otherwise happen. What they learn as youngsters can be used in new ways on broader canvases later in life. For example, Jonathan will probably become a great marketing guru. Marcus has the seeds of a marvelous counselor, attorney, or columnist in him. Justin will probably create masterful new software structures that will make sharing easier and more effective. Those are potentially beautiful futures for these young men. Child prodigies have always been with us. The lessons for those based in the Internet will be the same as for those who did it in music or the motion pictures. You have to keep developing yourself, have sound values, and prepare for an adult role that you enjoy and are good at. I do feel for the parents of these young people. They are the ones with the big challenge! After you finish enjoying this wonderful book, I suggest that you think about where you can pursue lifelong

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1