Customer Reviews for

The Next Decade: Where We've Been . . . and Where We're Going

Average Rating 3
( 45 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted March 1, 2011

    Are you ever puzzled by U.S. foreign policy? If so, you will find this book a worthwhile read.

    Mr. Friedman presents a thought provoking view of foreign policy that is especially insightful when considering the present happenings in the middle east and north Africa. He clearly describes a plausible explanation for the sometimes contradictory appearing policies of the U.S.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 25, 2011

    9.99 on Kindle

    Why so much more? look forward to reading it.

    3 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    AN UNINTENDED EMPIRE ¿ LIKE IT OR NOT

    Friedman¿s premise is that the United States is an unintended empire that cannot disentangle itself from its global interests, regardless how many people wish this was the case, without destabilizing the American and global economies. His concern is whether the management of an empire can be made compatible with the requirements of a republic. Friedman indicates that government must have a moral basis for power, but the exercise of power is morally ambiguous. Hence Friedman maintains that the single institution, elected by the people, that can save the republic is the presidency. However, a Machiavellian president is required ¿ one that can reconcile duplicity and righteousness in order to achieve and maintain American greatness. His examples of Machiavellian presidents who were moral men able to lie, violate the law, and betray principle as necessary were Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan. Friedman also maintains that we need a more mature and enlightened public that spends more time arguing over issues and practical alternatives and less time arguing over what to argue over or bemoaning all the things that are not fair or perfect. I have to agree with the latter point wholeheartedly. I think some of the recent unproductive congressional debates give evidence to this. In addition, further proof can be found by perusing the comments made to any online political or social article. Viewer comments are often at best simplistic and uninformed and at worst are often bigoted, selfish and stupid. At any rate, among the examples Friedman provides requiring presidential duplicity, i.e. paying lip service to them while recognizing they are impossible, are Middle East peace treaties involving an independent Palestinian state, achieving energy independence this decade, solving the immigration problem, and significantly curtailing the drug trade from Mexico. Nobody including or especially most of the Arab nations wants an independent Palestinian state. We will be dependent on oil or coal or natural gas until we harness solar power from satellites in space. Space will also host the next weapons systems and the groundwork needs to be laid during the next decade. ID cards would resolve the immigration problem but would be unacceptable to the American public. Legalizing drugs would destroy the drug trade but would likewise be unacceptable to the American public. Friedman explains that American interests lie in ensuring the continued dominance of the US navy and ensuring a balance is retained in each region of the world without the need to commit substantial numbers of US troops. The recovery of Russia, Germany¿s growing dependence on Russia, and the lack of an effective counterbalance to Iran are among the problems America will have to address during the next decade. The US will have to court Turkey and Poland, distance itself from Israel, and come to an accommodation with Pakistan and Iran. This book provides an interesting perspective. I¿ll never listen to politicians again, at least on the topics Friedman addresses, without considering whether they are being duplicitous or ignorant.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    Friedman's understanding and insights to America are spot on, bu

    Friedman's understanding and insights to America are spot on, but I feel that he gives America (it's people and its leadership) too much credit. An entity in motion has a trajectory, and the trajectory of America was launched by invasion, conquest, genocide and slavery. Then, like an ignorant, spoiled and greedy child, it set about devouring everything in sight and demanding to have its own way. America will continue the course it's set because it's people are risk averse and the unknown frightens them. Only an intervention will alter the course, forcing the willful "child" to mature and see the error of its ways! But, who or what is powerful enough to do that? Doom and gloom you say? The party's over and it's time to clean up! But it's more likely that America will lay down in the mess it's made waiting for someone else to clean it up, like it did with Y2K!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2013

    Insightful

    Even if you could set aside the prognostications, which he admits are intelligent probable estimates based on historical realities, seeing all of the history and news that we know used to present an objective narrative of what may be was astonishingly insightful,

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2013

    Good read...makes one think

    point of view is interesting and historically significant..Not sure I agree with all tenets

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2012

    Great book, a must read

    Every american must read this book to understand where America will be positioning in the world for the next decade. Spain ruled the world for almost 400 years, Great Britain for almost 200 years. The question is how American will keep their predominance in the world in years to come.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3