Customer Reviews for

The Nicomachean Ethics

Average Rating 4
( 31 )
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5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(8)

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(9)

2 Star

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Excellent Book

Aristotle lays down the foundations for life and mans purpose. He asserts that the supreme good, or highest goal for man, is happiness. A happiness that consists of a rich and fulfilling life focused on virtuous behavior rather than pleasure. He concludes that man shoul...
Aristotle lays down the foundations for life and mans purpose. He asserts that the supreme good, or highest goal for man, is happiness. A happiness that consists of a rich and fulfilling life focused on virtuous behavior rather than pleasure. He concludes that man should fulfill his rationality through contemplation and moral education to reach this goal. A major theme in this book is Aristotle's rejection of Plato's Theory of the Forms. He argues that learning should be empirical (derived from what can be experienced and observed) and not based on overcoming reality. Another theme is the criticism of Hedonism (which was the philosophy of the time) which said, "Eat drink and be merry for tomorrow we die." Aristotle argued that true happiness or "eudaimonia" comes from living a full, rich, and virtuous life, not from pleasure.
I like how Aristotle confronted Hedonism and previous perceptions of happiness that ignore morality as a means of achieving pleasure. This is still a huge problem in our society, as many people are in search of bodily pleasures and ignore matters of the soul. I like the idea of the Golden Mean, that every virtue in excess or in deficiency can be a vice. I disliked how dry and hard to get through the book was, but it's understandable as much of Aristotle's work include the organization of his thoughts as they are being explained. I also strongly disagreed with his idea of incontinence (or indifference). I consider this a vice which is more than just bad, because although it may simply require passivity and not action, it is still a choice to refuse good when it is in one's power to give it, and this is an evil which is almost unforgivable.
I recommend this book to everyone. Although some of the ideas may seem simple to us now that they have been accepted for hundreds of years, they are still remarkably complex for the time that they were written. The ideas about virtue, happiness, friendship, contemplation, and purpose are still relevant and valuable today.

posted by ChelseaBaines on March 25, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Good book

Good book for someone who is learning or trying to understand the ancient philosophy and Greek philosophers.

posted by Anonymous on December 16, 2003

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  • Posted March 25, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent Book

    Aristotle lays down the foundations for life and mans purpose. He asserts that the supreme good, or highest goal for man, is happiness. A happiness that consists of a rich and fulfilling life focused on virtuous behavior rather than pleasure. He concludes that man should fulfill his rationality through contemplation and moral education to reach this goal. A major theme in this book is Aristotle's rejection of Plato's Theory of the Forms. He argues that learning should be empirical (derived from what can be experienced and observed) and not based on overcoming reality. Another theme is the criticism of Hedonism (which was the philosophy of the time) which said, "Eat drink and be merry for tomorrow we die." Aristotle argued that true happiness or "eudaimonia" comes from living a full, rich, and virtuous life, not from pleasure.
    I like how Aristotle confronted Hedonism and previous perceptions of happiness that ignore morality as a means of achieving pleasure. This is still a huge problem in our society, as many people are in search of bodily pleasures and ignore matters of the soul. I like the idea of the Golden Mean, that every virtue in excess or in deficiency can be a vice. I disliked how dry and hard to get through the book was, but it's understandable as much of Aristotle's work include the organization of his thoughts as they are being explained. I also strongly disagreed with his idea of incontinence (or indifference). I consider this a vice which is more than just bad, because although it may simply require passivity and not action, it is still a choice to refuse good when it is in one's power to give it, and this is an evil which is almost unforgivable.
    I recommend this book to everyone. Although some of the ideas may seem simple to us now that they have been accepted for hundreds of years, they are still remarkably complex for the time that they were written. The ideas about virtue, happiness, friendship, contemplation, and purpose are still relevant and valuable today.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Translation - Always Welcome Teachings

    Ethics nowadays is so confused and grouped with 'morals' that few consider the difference. Those who do use the argument for Ethics to veer the rest towards their own views and so 'Ethics' as a set of conduct is constantly hijacked by the 'righteous' for their own purposes.

    It is great we still have Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics to remind us what it is all about.
    And this new translation is conscise, clear, up-to-date and with plenty of endnotes conferring with other valued translations of the past and current academic debates regarding it.

    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics shows us that conduct is a choice only the human animal with our ability to question and to reason can develop into a set of ethics that brings us with equilibrium with ourselves, our community and planet. Making us thus greater than the sum of our individual parts as one gestalt entity, and as part of a community of humans.

    It shows us our choices ought to be irrespective of fear of a hell or hope of a reward.
    It is choices we ought to develop into habits, into our ethics for our humanity alone. For the benefit to our interactions with our families, friends, community, society and planet at-large.

    With this in mind Aristotle proceeds then to clearly delineate, describe and quantify what these particular choices are that we develop normally but that should be actively and conscientiously sought out by us to make us better more wholesome human beings. Because if we are to live one life on this planet and nothing more, we should try and learn to be a positive part in it and of it. Thus become of value to ourselves, our community, our planet.

    It is always with great interest I seek these arguments and am in my 2nd read of this very rewarding book.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2006

    Naturally, very good

    As most philosophy professors would agree this book is a classic and should be read by all students before leaving college.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2003

    Good book

    Good book for someone who is learning or trying to understand the ancient philosophy and Greek philosophers.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2000

    best ever

    great book must read

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2014

    Kaya

    Oh thts ok lol i relly dident care i thought it was funny

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2014

    Macey

    *she walked in*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2014

    A Masked Man

    Take you to iron mask all results.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2014

    Ansley

    Ok just didnt want you to be mad lol

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2014

    &Alpha Aphrodite Cabin &Alpha

    Aphrodite Cabin

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  • Posted July 9, 2014

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2011

    Pretty okay

    Does not have the Bekker page #s. Other than that it is okay.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2008

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    Posted June 15, 2009

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    Posted September 8, 2010

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    Posted July 26, 2009

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    Posted November 5, 2008

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    Posted March 17, 2010

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    Posted August 10, 2011

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    Posted August 29, 2009

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