Customer Reviews for

The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't

Average Rating 4
( 81 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(33)

4 Star

(21)

3 Star

(17)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 5
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2007

    A Pop Culture Title , But Not Just Another Pop Culture Book

    I am a television producer who couldn't resist buying this book, since unfortunately, bad behavior is the norm where I live and work. Ironically, it is also a killer of creativity, the one commodity that Hollywood needs on an neverending basis. The book was full of wonderful, relatable examples of how 'certified' a-holes truly create an unproductive and unhealthy work environment, not to mention the personal fallout for the receivers. I especially enjoyed Sutton's little quizzes for determining a-hole behavior, his tips for how to combat being on the losing end, and the last chapter, 'The No A-Hole Rule as a Way of Life.'

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2008

    There's really a word for it

    I have never read a book the depicted someone I worked for as closely as this book. Now I fully understand that I'm not crazy and any sane person would have wanted to quit after being treated as poorly as I had been by this one 'asshole' that I worked with. I truly enjoyed this book and at times actually laughed out loud. To think that there is a way to keep these people out of the workplace is awesome. Now all we need to do is make this book mandatory for all HR Managers and every student in college so that they don't become one of them, or better yet, can recognize them for what they truly are.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2011

    Before you point a finger...

    Make sure it shouldn't be pointed at yourself. Many thanks to the woman on the flight to Nashville who suggested this book. She was an HR person and even though I am not, I got so much out of this book. And thanks to my Nook for sparking the conversation about "best book you've read lately" on the flight in the first place!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 20, 2010

    an interesting analysis

    This book is a manual about making one's work place a nicer place to be. As the title suggests, the focus of the book is on the co-workers, specifically the "tough-to-get-along-with" personalities. The first half of this book is aimed at the higher management, with tips how to weed out those types during the hiring process, as the author logically believes that once they're hired, they influence more of the same type of people to join the company-until the whole place becomes a breeding ground for jerks. Such a work atmosphere, as the author points out, actually hinders productivity and overall morale. Sutton's second half of the book discusses dealing with difficult co-workers. A chapter is devoted to strategies for dealing with them at work, while other chapters are aimed at getting rid of your own inner jerk and, for better understanding, the benefits of acting like a jerk where Sutton explains the psychology behind such behavior. Overall, this was a quick read. Sutton is a professor at Stanford, and actually based this book off a Harvard Review article he wrote about the same topic. I thought the idea behind the book was pretty interesting. If you're looking for a short take on "the toxic workplace," than this is for you.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2008

    I work with a bunch of you know whats

    Sutton the author of this book is a management science and engineering professor from Stanford. In this book he suggests (correctly, in my opinion) that we can all be difficult sometimes and that being difficult can, in certain scenarios, actually contribute to our effectiveness as managers. However, he counteracts this argument with the reality that some people are 'certified¿ you know whats who are difficult to fire because they are often in positions of authority and are mistakenly deemed talented and effective by their superiors. It's a fun and readable book, that shows you how to deal with these folks and create and I think anyone with people issues will benefit from using it to inspire some fresh thinking. The other gem I've found helpful in these situations (for dealing with difficult people and keeping myself under control) is The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2007

    A reviewer

    I am so glad that Bob Sutton's book is an instruction in memory for me rather than the survival guide it is for so many. Thirty years in business means I have seen more than my fair share of a***holes and while they may be inevaitable, they can be resisted and fought. Sutton's real innovation is in creating a 'total cost of a***holes' showing the real detriment to the business that these jerks actually are. Smart, funny, quick and spot-on.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2012

    A great book!

    This book is quintessential for all aspects of life. This book helped me to see in all situations that there are people who can disrupt and destroy even the most noble of causes. Highly recommended and empowering.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    Great point of view on workplace bullies and there effect of the workplace culture. Adapted from a Harvard Business Review article. Well researched and clearly presented thesis.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    NEEDS TO BE READ BY SENIOR MANAGEMENT

    There are few revelations in this book for those of us who work in an environment rampant with as*holes. However, it is affirming to have an independent, unsolicited authority describe the perpetrators, the environment and the impact. Sutton's quantification of certified as*holes (CAs) as distinguished from occasional as*holes and his definition of a decent person is useful. Sutton provides an "As*hole Test" and describes the "Dirty Dozen" traits. However, the best indicator is how a higher status person treats a lower status person. The CA consistently insults, demeans and personally attacks those of lesser status. The person that is "persistently warm and civilized toward people of unknown or lower status.is a decent human being". The impact of an overabundance of CAs on employees is devastating because it saps energy and esteem. The results, which are detrimental to both employee and company, include reduced productivity, less work and life satisfaction, heightened depression, irritability and anger. Sutton also points out that in a fear based organization (i.e., management by intimidation) the last thing employees want is the spotlight on them. Hence they are afraid to offer input and help solve problems when they know how to do so. Poor communication, no diversity of ideas, poor morale, and lack of employee empowerment makes a company's decision making much less intelligent. Legal costs are also higher in organizations that are led by or that shelter CAs as employee claims are easier to prove when open hostility runs rampant. In addition, Sutton attempts to quantify the total cost of as*holes (TCA), offers suggestions on how to implement a "No As*hole Rule", and provides some common sense survival strategies for those unable to escape an as*hole rich environment. The tragedy is that those as*holes out there that most need to read this book, especially in senior management, are probably the less likely to do so.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 5, 2010

    A book for our weird times

    Prof. Sutton's book is a super timely book that should be required reading for employers, as well as our political leaders. Our labour practices are getting more and more weird by the day, week and month.
    http://exquisitehumanity.blogspot.com/2010/06/unemployed-will-not-be-considered.html

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Fantastic

    This is a great read! I helped me deal with my own work place situation. I am sooo glad I found this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2009

    Management 101

    This CD was a great deal from B&N (cheap!) and the content was better than expected. The author, a professor from Stanford, somehow knows a lot more about the workplace than most corporate people I've worked for over the years. He even practices what he preaches...his work group refuses to ruin their civil climate by keeping creeps, bullies, and a**holes OUT of the mix. Oh, how I wish I had the luxury!
    There's a true story Sutton tells about a community that accidentally loses their a**holes (I won't ruin it for you) that had me in stitches. I've relayed the story to friends and they've cracked up, too.
    This book should be a required course for management. I've been tempted to leave the CD in my VP's mailbox! Our company could get so much more done if we could get rid of the bullies who stonewall projects, back-stab, and generally make our jobs tougher just because their methods worked on the playground in elementary school.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Strategic take on dealing with weasels

    Robert I. Sutton, Ph.D., professor of organizational behavior, teaches management science at Stanford University. He is a learned, respected academic. Is it odd that such an erudite, sophisticated individual would write a book with profanity in its title? Not according to Sutton. Yes, mean-spirited, nasty people are weasels and dirty rats. But the word that ideally summarizes such a person, Sutton says, is in his title, so that's what he uses. He first employed it in a much-quoted piece in the Harvard Business Review. He expanded that article into this book, which explains why the business world seems to be knee deep in ratfinks, how to avoid them and how to deal with them when you must. getAbstract suggests that if you work in an office or hospital or bank or submarine or massage parlor, or on a cement crew, loading dock, oilrig or spaceship to Mars, you probably must deal with your share of - let's call them weasels. Sutton's book teaches you how to do so most effectively and not get too banged up in the process.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2007

    Exceptional Reading

    It may seem like pure shock to use the 'A-hole' word in the title of a book, but anyone with life or business experience knows that certain people are gold-plated a-holes. This book is exceptional in that it characterizes their behavior in complete and accurate terms. Moreover, this book addresses the reality that professional cultures can insipre this class of people, or even make them thrive. Microsoft comes to mind as a perfect example. So it's not about whether or not they exist, it's about survival. This book is aid and comfort to the many who suffer through the tyranny of the a-hole.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2007

    This Book is a Keeper!

    Sutton gets it just right in this highly entertaining and relevant book. We all know people like those described in the book. And coping with them - or better yet keeping them out of our work lives - is a problem worth solving. It's nice to see someone in academia who embraces the practical concerns of real-life managers. Sutton's blend of case studies and thoughtful analysis is like a tonic for the spirit of those of us who have endured the sphincterage of terrible colleagues. You might wish that Sutton had written this book a while ago. Do your children a favor and save a copy for them. They'll need it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2009

    Good for work, good for life. For seasoned employees, a refresher on interpersonal skills when feeling threatened; for those about to enter the workforce, good supplemental reading.

    Author provides sound advice and affirmation for how to deal with difficult people and/or difficult situations. While specific to work or professional situations, it is applicable to family and social situations as well.

    Sutton's style is easy to read so that the book for me was a "fast read." He provides guidelines on how to proceed, followed by specific examples that are relevant and entertaining without being morose.

    The book was appropriate to where I am right now. I don't know whether I would feel the same way about the book if I wasn't looking for solutions to my own predicament.

    However, many thanks to Robert Sutton for writing the book, to Grand Central for publishing it, and to Barnes & Noble for stocking it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2007

    A reviewer

    I LOVE this book! Although I am now a self-employed consultant, there are strategies in this little book which can be used with difficult clients as well. I've been lucky enough to work in only one corporate environment filled with a*******s!-In my experience, women are the worst offenders, 'gang girls in suits' has been my description of backstabbing, jealous women. I could have used this book as a bible a few years ago, however, it is filled with practical advice on general mental health strategies for coping with difficult people in any arena. His advice: 'You should develop indifference and emotional attachment,' he advises. 'There are times when the best thing for your mental health is to not give a damn about your job, company, and especially all those nasty people'...one can apply this advice in most everyday circumstances. I've given this book to many of my friends in the corporate world.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2007

    No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't

    I have never written a review on Barnes and Noble, but feel strongly about writing a review for Sutton's No A**hole book. As a female professional, I felt highly empowered reading this book. Dr. Sutton acknowledges the bullying and crass behavior that frequently occurs in the workplace and offers concrete ways to combat these trying individuals. I have already practiced his technique of publicly discounting bullying behavior with great success. I found his suggestions for handling office place bullies - as both a superior and subordinate actions extremely smart and well-grounded. This book is based on sound social psychology and organizational research and does a great service to workers throughout the world. I have dog earred many pages of the book and expect it to be a handy reference for many years to come. Also, I have book marked Dr. Sutton's blog and Arse Test for daily reference at work!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2007

    Another Wonderful Word From Sutton

    I have been a big fan of Bob Sutton's work for many years and this latest adds to the wealth of material he has graced us with. While his Knowing Doing Gap continues to be my absolute favorite management book ever, this comes close (OK, so did Weird Ideas). Typical of his great writing, Sutton combines both anecdotes and research to again reveal some truth that has been staring us in the face all along.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2007

    No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't

    I don't often review books due to lack of time but feel strongly about writing a review for Sutton's No A**hole book because I feel many people whose might be concerned about the 'taboo' title might not look beyond it and do themselves a great disservice. As a female professional, I felt highly empowered reading this book. Dr. Sutton acknowledges the bullying and crass behavior that frequently occurs in the workplace and offers concrete ways to combat these trying individuals. I have already practiced his technique of publicly discounting bullying behavior with great success. I found his suggestions for handling office place bullies - as both a superior and subordinate actions extremely smart and well-grounded. This book is based on sound social psychology and organizational research and does a great service to workers throughout the world. I have dog earred many pages of the book and expect it to be a handy reference for many years to come.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 5