Customer Reviews for

No Country for Old Men

Average Rating 4
( 234 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(114)

4 Star

(71)

3 Star

(31)

2 Star

(10)

1 Star

(8)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Gory, Intense, Engrossing, and Beautiful. Those are the first wo

Gory, Intense, Engrossing, and Beautiful. Those are the first words coming to mind when I hear No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. This novel is near perfect. Cormac’s unique writing style suits the book entirely well and does the story itself justice. Aside from...
Gory, Intense, Engrossing, and Beautiful. Those are the first words coming to mind when I hear No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. This novel is near perfect. Cormac’s unique writing style suits the book entirely well and does the story itself justice. Aside from the superb writing, the story is entrancing and entertaining. The non-stop action and bizarre protagonists can keep even the smallest attention span intrigued. Lleweyn Moss finds millions of dollars in the desert and decides to keep it for himself. Little does he know that the most brilliant hit man in the entire south is right on his tail. Moss tries to keep his wife and the money safe at the same time, although has trouble juggling the two. We find Moss often times trying to find unique contortions and contraptions to hide the money but this brutal hit man isn’t falling for any of it, killing almost everyone he comes in contact with in order to obtain his prize. Alongside This hit man is the entire Mexican drug cartel, striving to conceive this case of money. Moss has a run in with all of these people and continues to survive these intense scuffles but when he realizes he has to leave the sate is when he also realizes that his luck may be running out. Detective Bell, a long time Sherriff in a small county in Texas is on these men’s tail also trying to get to the bottom of all the murders and guns fired in his once small, peaceful community. A true tail of cat and mouse that will have you biting your nails to the last flip of the page. Get ready for some late nights because it will be very hard for you to put down this book until you have turned all 350 pages of this seemingly easy read. 5 stars. Fantastic.

posted by Anonymous on September 16, 2012

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Actually, the movie was better

After watching the film I ran straight out of the theatre and to Barnes and Noble and purchased this book. During the first pages of the book it's clear McCarthy doesn't use comas and it didn't feel like a natural read to me. The sentences ran a mile long and felt to ...
After watching the film I ran straight out of the theatre and to Barnes and Noble and purchased this book. During the first pages of the book it's clear McCarthy doesn't use comas and it didn't feel like a natural read to me. The sentences ran a mile long and felt to amaturish. The movie and the book are about the same so if you want the entertainment just rent the film. Although this wasn't a horrible book with the characters development and the overall plot I thought it could've been written a little better. Of course i'm not saying that I won't give another one of his books a read but this one didn't cut it for me. I would actually like to read "The Road" seems interesting enough.

posted by AVID_BOOK_READER82 on October 16, 2008

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 114 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 6
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2012

    Gory, Intense, Engrossing, and Beautiful. Those are the first wo

    Gory, Intense, Engrossing, and Beautiful. Those are the first words coming to mind when I hear No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. This novel is near perfect. Cormac’s unique writing style suits the book entirely well and does the story itself justice. Aside from the superb writing, the story is entrancing and entertaining. The non-stop action and bizarre protagonists can keep even the smallest attention span intrigued. Lleweyn Moss finds millions of dollars in the desert and decides to keep it for himself. Little does he know that the most brilliant hit man in the entire south is right on his tail. Moss tries to keep his wife and the money safe at the same time, although has trouble juggling the two. We find Moss often times trying to find unique contortions and contraptions to hide the money but this brutal hit man isn’t falling for any of it, killing almost everyone he comes in contact with in order to obtain his prize. Alongside This hit man is the entire Mexican drug cartel, striving to conceive this case of money. Moss has a run in with all of these people and continues to survive these intense scuffles but when he realizes he has to leave the sate is when he also realizes that his luck may be running out. Detective Bell, a long time Sherriff in a small county in Texas is on these men’s tail also trying to get to the bottom of all the murders and guns fired in his once small, peaceful community. A true tail of cat and mouse that will have you biting your nails to the last flip of the page. Get ready for some late nights because it will be very hard for you to put down this book until you have turned all 350 pages of this seemingly easy read. 5 stars. Fantastic.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    A fast paced adventure

    The story was a little odd but really a fun read. McCarthy has such a unique writing style that challenges the reader but also adds to this short novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    Fantastic

    Sure this book isn't the typical book we are acustomed to reading. By that I refer to the style it is written and the way it speaks to you. Cormac does an excellent job at throwing you into a unknown world and making you believe it exists. I watched the film adaption of the book first and when i heard there was a book to it I bought it as soon as possible. Because as we all know film adaptions tend to skim on things. To my surprise the book was alot like the film minus the character development and more filling details the film did not provide. Plus the different ending. Interesting story to say the least.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2011

    Hey you! Yeah you, READ THIS!!!

    Do you enjoy suspense? What about gunfighting? What about the desert? If you answered yes, then No Country for Old Men is definately for you! Cormac McCarthy uses detailed words and descriptive verbs to make you feel as if you are right there, first-handedly witnessing every event. The story realistically portrays the happenings of an extremely murderous fugitive and a wandering cowboy with a suitcase full of cash. McCarthy uses his words and imagery to paint lush landscapes and many crafty techniques to paint crafty pictures of the small Washington town in which the story takes place. The suspense of the novel comes from the seclusive nature of the events; You know something extreme could happen at any minute, but it stays unclear as to exactly when or how it may happen. This factor drew me to the novel greatly. The novel is unlike any other, in that it switches between two stories: One of the fugitive, and the other of the cowboy. It shows the paths they take, as those paths cross, one ends, and the other carries on. There are many unexpected events, such as suprise shootouts, random input from the sheriff on the hunt for the fugitive, and personal dilemnas, all leading up to an abrupt ending that will leave you completely and totally breathless. No Country For Old Men is a great story for any reader who loves action, suspense, vivid scenery, and much more. Cormac McCarthy has done great work in this novel, and I would highly recommend it to any reader who fits in any age group between young adult and elder. This is an exceptional piece of writing, and if I were you, I wouldn't hesitate to dig into it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Arresting

    The impact of this book hit me every chapter. The violence shook me as well as the insights of the sheriff. The veracity strung my soul out and made me taught. I won't forget it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    One of the rare books that I cannot seem to be able to put down,

    One of the rare books that I cannot seem to be able to put down, one if no they best book I've ever read. It is the definition of a page turner, absolutely love it, it just sucks you. And this is coming from a university level reader, who is not the biggest fan of reading, but with a book like this, Cormac McCarthy might be replacing ABC, FX, Fox, E!, etc. I recommend this to anyone who believes in great literature

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    "Call it"

    One of the great books out there waiting to be read. The movie extremely closely follows the text and they are both really something special. The book's main point, it's message, is that the once mighty leaders of our Union now have become obsolete in the newly evolved world of crime we live in today. Sheriff Bell is easily a simple and understandable character, but his life and the way he knows that he doesn't belong is so intense and wondrous that you can relate to him and make the link to the real world. It a very personal story about how even though society was never pure in the first place, that there was a time when we were more respectable. I recommend this great read and The Pelican Brief as well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2009

    Quite exceptionally I had seen the movie before I read the book. While I do not like to know the plot when reading a book, usually, I found the screenplay adhered closely to the book's story line and I enjoyed having the character images as I read.

    See headline

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2009

    Entertaining!

    This is a good read that is difficult to predict. It is difficult to keep track of the characters but that makes for a good challenge. Because of the questionable resolution, it is good controversy with another reader.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 1, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    No Country for Old Men

    This was my very first and defiantly not my last book by my favorite author, Cormac Mccarthy. I am know reading Blood Meridian which is even better than this book, but don't let that discourage you, this book is awesome. The story is good and the plot really asks you, what would you do if you were in the shoes of Lewelen Moss, the main character, who<BR/>steals money after witnessing a drug-deal gone wrong. Chasing him is Anton Chigurh, my all-time favorite literary character, and chasing Chigurh is Sheriff Bell. This is one of my favorite books and I never wanted it end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2008

    My favorite book of all time

    I read this book after I saw the trailer for the movie. This is my favorite book and it has now convinced me to buy all of Cormac McCarthy's books. I loved how he wrote this book and I also think the characters, especially Anton Chigurh, were amazing. This book is a must read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2008

    A reviewer

    The sun had long set over the California coast when I finished the book No Country for Old Men. I set it down on the dusty table next to me and I thought long and hard about it for a while. I've read books with better stories but I couldn't say that many others deliver the same punch that this one did. I'll be danged if that good ol' boy Cormac McCarthy didn't just go and deliver one of the finest meditations on violence I ever done read. The narrative bounces back and forth like a jackrabbit on hot Texas asphalt first it's a third-person account of all these fellers who get mixed up with a drug deal gone bad then sometimes it's first person musings from Sheriff Ed Tom Bell, who's got plenty of skeletons in his own closet. It seems to me that there was no reason for the plot to have been so jumpy towards the end of the book. McCarthy could of had his say about the ramifications of violence and still sewn up the plot a little tighter. Then again, I ain't got no Pulitzer, and I ain't likely to get one any time soon. I reckon McCarthy is pretty much a master of literary prose, even if he does leave out all them quotations marks so you can't sometimes figure out what the heck he's trying to get at. I sure do wish there was someone smarter than me to explain the highfalutin' themes that probably went over my head, but if you can find me a better book than this one, I'll be first in line to read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2008

    Tense and terse

    As an Australian reader, I felt that I almost had to do a mental translation as I read this book. The southern drawl was challenging but it in no way interfered with my appreciation of the book. I decided to read the novel after seeing the movie recently and was relieved to find that some of my puzzling questions were answered by the book. I struggle to understand how some reviewers were dissatisfied with the ending. I thought that it was handled well. In the midst of the doom and gloom befalling society through the lawlessness of a crime (especially narcotics) addled society I saw the lamp as a symbol of hope just lying ahead. The path may be treacherous but there is safety and comfort to be found if one has the faith to believe. Likewise I feel that some readers have failed to appreciate the depth of Chigurh's character. He was not without morals, this was demonstrated in the discussions with Carla Jean and his hirer. Both of which reflected his sincerity, which although not conventional, was strong. I especially enjoyed the writing style and lacking punctuation. To me, this reflected the harsh realities of an unforgiving landscape and the gritty reality of the characters, each of whom I perceived to only use language and emotions when necessary. This was my first contact with the author, but it will definitely not be my last.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2008

    Outstanding

    Fantastic book. I agree that it can get a little confusing with the sentence structure and all that, so you do have to pay close attention as you are reading, but I loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2007

    Read This

    Do you know what the word mammon means? You will when you finish this novel. This book should be read before 'The Road' as it is like a companion novel. Thank you Cormac,sir, for a great read and am afraid that you are right on track.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Old warrior finds his bearings

    I was drawn in from the beginning. What was it that intrigued me? It was about the disorientation of a old warrior trying to find his bearings. Life had slowed down and he was trying to assess what things were worth his life. He ultimately came to the conviction that he didn¿t want to do hand to hand combat with the devil. He knew he was outmatched. He saw the flotsam and jetsam of those who thought they could. He was trying to process the feelings of guilt and cowardliness. He also saw the wasteland of those who attempted to get rich quick, or get rich through dishonest means or through marketing addictive substances to weak victims. It all ended the same death, destruction, disappointment, a wasteland. Any who were related to those captivated by fools gold were also destroyed in the wake. Cormac pulled the cover back on evil personified a conscienceless, tortuous, merciless destroyer who gloried in violence and executing his victims. However, Cormac subtly and geniusly revealed how what have become common values in our culture are insidiously linked to this evil (i.e. loss of manners to murder). Ultimately, Cormac painted the picture and dilemmas of a modern aging man living in a postmodern age of relativity. It was an invigorating read that made me hunger for truth, beauty and grace.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2006

    Couldn't put this book down

    This is one of the most compelling books I've read in a long time. As a native Texan with lots of relatives who've been in law enforcement, I felt like Bell was someone I knew well. While sparingly drawn, I felt I saw everyone in that book, even minor characters. I hated having to put this book down - wanted to read until I finished it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2005

    McCarthy is getting better with each book

    It is rare for a contemporary living author to have the critical following that McCarthy has. It is even rarer for such an author to stay true to his craft. McCarthy has done both. I began reading McCarthy with Child of God, which puts the reader into the mind of a serial killer. Blood Meridian put the author in a category by himself as a storyteller. I am one of the many who became bogged down in the second book of the Border Trilogy. I must admit some trepidation when I began reading No Country for Old Men, afraid that I would not be able to finish it. But I immediately became immersed in the plot, the storytelling, and most importantly the characters. I was able to read the last third of the book over just a day or so. As a result, I reached the ending in the full flow of the intellectual imagery of the book. The author has such an ability to spur thoughts within the reader, simply by poking around at the inner thinking of characters who you absolutely swear must be real because of the utter lack of exaggeration, fantasy, or stereotypicality in the character's traits.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2005

    A Song for the Aging

    Cormac McCarthy in his current novel NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN distills all that was fine in his previous novels, siphoning off the rambling verbal romance with the countryside, and keying in on character in a manner far more successful than ever. His language is so pungent and spare while saying volumes that this book could literally be turned into a script for a film without much doctoring. He tells a fascinatingly gory tale of crime in the realm of drug trafficking along the border of Texas and Mexico, a story so vividly painted in words that the reader may feel the need to turn the head aside to avoid the gruesome details, and yet excellent as this narrative is, the main punch that makes this novel so fine is the use of italicized musings by one old Sheriff Bell who reflects on the changes in his hometown and in the resultant spirit of mankind which seems to be heading toward destruction of society as we know (or have known) it.The story involves youngish welder Lewellyn Moss who happens across murdered bodies and cars, finding an obvious heroin deal gone bad, the money for the payoff (some 2+ million dollars) left behind in a bag. In a moment of fate Moss decides to take the money and run, telling only his wife of his plans. How he proceeds through the chase by special agents and one evil plunderer who kills everything in his path that deters his seizing the money is the grisly bulk of the story. No sooner do we meet characters than they are killed - and the path of death spreads out like a plague from the intial site of the drug deal.This is as descriptive and entrancing a crime novel as you will find, but that doesn't seem to be McCarthy's driver. A consummate storyteller, he pauses at various times during this story to allow the reader to breathe and during each entr'acte he places words in the language of Bell that muse on how war changes men, how decisions made spontaneously can cripple the mind for life, and how the current (set in the 1980s) climate has become so violent that salvation may not be feasible. The wisdom falls simply out of the mouths of the old men: 'You think when you wake up in the morning yesterday dont count. But yesterday is all that does count. What else is there? Your life is made out of the days it's made out of. Nothin else. You might think you could run away and change your name and I dont know what all. Start over. And then one mornin you wake up and look at the ceilin and guess who's layin there?' And on the subject of war: 'I was too young for one war and too old for the next one. But I seen what come out of it. You can be patriotic and still believe that some things cost more than what they're worth. Ask them Gold Star mothers what they paid and what they got for it. You always pay too much. Particularly for promises. There aint no such thing as a bargain promise....I always thought when I got older that God would sort of come into my life in some way. He didnt. I dont blame him. If I was him I'd have the same opinion about me he does.'Cormac McCarthy¿s ease of writing here makes this particular novel utterly irresistible. Few writers can match the naturalness of his prose and poetry of his content. In this reader's opinion, this is McCarthy¿s finest achievement. Recommended without reservation. Grady Harp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Fans of modern-day High Noon will enjoy this action-packed western thriller

    In 1980, Llewelyn Moss hunts antelope in Western Texas near the Rio Grande. However, instead of locating a buck, Moss finds several corpses, a major heroin stash and $2.4 million. Moss figures finder¿s keepers and takes the cash leaving behind the dead and the illegal drugs figuring both could be more trouble than he wants to deal with..................... However the cartel that owns the money sends former Special Forces soldier Wells to find the loot and kill the thief. They also send vicious killing machine, psychopathic poster boy Chigurh to insure the thief is brutalized. Finally, aging Sheriff Bell seeks Moss for questioning and to keep him alive................... Several years have passed since Cormac McCarthy completed his fabulous Border Trilogy. The highly regarded author returns to the same locale with the thrilling NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN. The four prime testosterone players are potent protagonists who the audience anticipates a convergance while wondering who will be left standing once the war turns full throttle. Fans of modern-day High Noon will enjoy this action-packed western thriller from the moment Moss becomes the prey of two totally different professionals and the title character sheriff ready to retire, but still doing his duty................... Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 114 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 6