Customer Reviews for

No, David!

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

My 3 Year Old Son's FAVORITE BOOK

Every night he wants to read this book! He LOVES it and laughs every time. Very easy read! It's a good one to share a laugh with your 2, 3, or 4 year old sons....they think David's pretty funny and they see themselves in David so it's just a fun book to read and have a ...
Every night he wants to read this book! He LOVES it and laughs every time. Very easy read! It's a good one to share a laugh with your 2, 3, or 4 year old sons....they think David's pretty funny and they see themselves in David so it's just a fun book to read and have a little laugh with your kids type of a book. =)

posted by SHELLI28 on March 28, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

        Saddening vitriol. Oppressive sadism. Overt authoritaria

        Saddening vitriol. Oppressive sadism. Overt authoritarianism. These are only three of the seemingly endless descriptors which come to mind when I think of David Shannon's literary abomination No, David, a so-called "children's book" which chronicles a ...
        Saddening vitriol. Oppressive sadism. Overt authoritarianism. These are only three of the seemingly endless descriptors which come to mind when I think of David Shannon's literary abomination No, David, a so-called "children's book" which chronicles a day in the life of David, a reckless and young rapscallion whose disobedience is matched only by his ugliness. An egregiously one sided dissertation on morality, No, David fails to educate children properly; rather than providing discourses on the importance of individuality and the occasional right to act as we please, Mr. Shannon chooses to depict a strict, borderline-Stalinist system of right and wrong that will surely hinder the development of our society's youth.
The indoctrination starts off somewhat subtle, but it isn't long before the story begins its inescapable descent into a fascist propagandist's pleasure read. The protagonist's mother stands poised on the first pages with her hands placed firmly on her hips, undeniably epitomizing the stern authority and powerful bureaucracy under which young David suffers. 
"No, David!" she vehemently screeches as the poor little boy tries to sneak a cookie out of his household's cookie jar. She wails similarly degrading comments toward her child as he plays with a potato, eats with his mouth open, frolics in the nude, and even as he trails a slight quantity of dirt inside their home. Yet, the most disturbing aspect of this book does not lie within the verbal brutality of the meek child's mother, nor does it lie within the poor illustrations which look as though they were done by a man suffering from PCP withdrawal. Instead, it lies in Mr. Shannon's intentions: to instruct other people's children how to live their lives in orderly and proper fashions. 
Why is it that David can't jovially jog around his neighborhood, naked as a newborn? What's keeping him from throwing caution to the wind, voraciously devouring that last cookie? Or, better yet, why should David not be able to do something so simple and innocent as play in the mud? Mr. Shannon's argument is that David can't do these things because his mother, the iron-willed, malevolent dictator from Hell, says so. "No, David," she exclaims repeatedly, each time with more spite and hatred in her voice than ever before.
As mothers and fathers around the world lazily regurgitate Mr. Shannon's views to their susceptible and unknowing children in an attempt to domesticate them, the rates of obedience may very well go up; however, this is not a good thing. Friedrich Nietzsche once said that it is the utmost responsibility of humans to "become who you are" -- that is, to discover your true self and allow him or her to flourish. This is exactly what a children's book of this sort deters. In a universe where our very existence is transient, children should be taught that it's ok to do what makes them happy; existentialist philosophy is no less prominent today than it was during centuries past, and so long as people are able to recognize the consequences of their actions they should be able to do as they please.
In sum, No, David is undoubtably the most poorly written and morally perverted piece of literature that a naive progeny of absentee parents could legally stumble upon. That being said, any parent who would knowingly purchase this book for a child should immediately seek psychiatric help. It should be avoided at all costs, and burned upon confrontation.

posted by Anonymous on January 12, 2015

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2014

    I thought that this book did a wonderful job of addressing behav

    I thought that this book did a wonderful job of addressing behavior problems at a young age. David has trouble finding things to do that are not going to get him in trouble, so his mother is often telling him "No,David!" David reminds me of my siblings. 7 of them have special needs and are often doing or saying things that they should not. It is difficult for my mom to keep herself from just repeating "no!" to them. I think that children like this book because they can relate to David. No matter what stage of life a child is in, they will, at some point, feel as if they are constrained by people telling them "no". It is important for children to know that this guidance is for their own good. A child needs to understand that sometimes adults make mistakes as well. This book does a great job of showing a child how they are similar to David, and hopefully it will help them see why adults sometimes get frustrated with them. A key lesson that needs to be taught when reading this book to your child or student, is that correction is not always a bad thing, and regardless of how many times they cause trouble, you are still there to help and love them.   

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2008

    Have you ever had to say 'NO!'

    Award-winning author David Shannon is best known for his ¿No David¿ books, and with reason. In general throughout these books little David gets into trouble constantly for one thing or another. For example, in No David, David has been getting into trouble all day. He has just played baseball in the house and broken a vase and table in the living room. ¿NO DAVID,¿ his mother says to him, ordering him to sit in the corner. What does David, our little trouble magnet do while he¿s supposed to be in time-out? He draws all over the walls. When reading the books you continually want to know what David will do next. Shannon¿s illustrations seem to be full of expression, like you are watching David jump off the page. It looks as though little David did the drawings himself. The illustrations look like pencil drawings, and the perspectives are also very childish. For example, little David¿s head and face are a lot larger than the rest of his body. But don¿t let David¿s trouble making keep you from sharing the fun and exciting books with your children. There is a moral to these stories, which is, sometimes children make mistakes and you have to tell them ¿NO.¿ In the end they learn what to do and not to do and they still know you love them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    A reviewer

    No, David! is a picture book and was chosen in 1999 as a Caldecott Honor Book. This is a story about a little boy named David who is constantly getting in trouble. It seems the only words his mother says are ¿No, David!¿, ¿Come back here, David!¿, ¿David! Be Quiet!¿. However, at the end of the book you see how much the mother really loves her son and that she has a few nice words for him, as well. I absolutely loved this book as a mother of a 4 year old I can relate to every picture in this book. The illustrations will make you laugh out loud! This book would be appropriate for ages 3-7. My four year old was very amused by the pictures in this book. David Shannon is both the author and illustrator of this book. When Mr. Shannon was five years old he wrote and illustrated his first book. One every page were the words, ¿No, David!¿ and pictures of all the things David wasn¿t supposed to do. That was the inspiration for this book. He has also written and illustrated books such as How Georgie Radbourn Saved Baseball, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book and The Amazing Christmas Extravaganza, an American Bookseller Pick. David Shannon grew up in Spokane, Washington and now lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Heidi, and their dog, Fergus. Shannon, David. No, David!. New York: The Blue Sky Press, 1998.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2005

    Teachers Thrilled About No, David!

    I read this book during a summer workshop a few years ago and absolutely loved it. It is truly a love story. As a high school reading teacher, I read it to my students during a character analysis lesson. They thought it was great too. This book is recommended for the young and the young at heart.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2002

    THIS IS A EXTREMELY FUNNY BOOK

    No, David By: David Shannon This story is about a disobedient boy named David. The drawings in this book are awesome. David¿s mother consistently said No, David. The author¿s writing is just like a child would write. 17-18 is the page that my buddys and me love. He drew and wrote this book when he was younger, (Meaning David Shannon.) This book also won a Caldecott Honor for his illustration. This will be a great book for someone who loves extremely funny book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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