Customer Reviews for

No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller

Average Rating 3.5
( 78 )
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(24)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Believable and Informative

I learned a lot from this book. It really did read like a real-life thriller, which was surprising since readers already know the ending. The author is to be commended for the clarity with which he explains the inside world of the "quants" how he came to his conclusio...
I learned a lot from this book. It really did read like a real-life thriller, which was surprising since readers already know the ending. The author is to be commended for the clarity with which he explains the inside world of the "quants" how he came to his conclusions. I found it particularly disturbing that so many experts understood the Madoff operation was a sham but did not come forward. This book should be required reading for anyone who argues that any industry will self-regulate. The lack of oversight by the SEC was villainous.

posted by marian59 on April 11, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Fell Far Short of Expectations

I'm afraid I was terribly disappointed by No One Would Listen. Markopolos clearly has an important story to tell and was at the center of team that uncovered Madoff nearly a decade before anyone else. There is no doubt Markopolos exposed not only Madoff but critical, ...
I'm afraid I was terribly disappointed by No One Would Listen. Markopolos clearly has an important story to tell and was at the center of team that uncovered Madoff nearly a decade before anyone else. There is no doubt Markopolos exposed not only Madoff but critical, systemic failures of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

But the writing was thick with Markopolos' arrogance and condescension, and it is clear he remains bitter his arguments were not taken seriously years earlier. That is certainly understandable. But I found his credibility somewhat diminished by vengeance to bring the SEC to its knees--which he did in spades. Someone who prides himself in honesty and the fairness of markets needn't have resorted to the self-serving tactics he resorted to--before his Congressional testimony, gratuitously speaking loudly enough for SEC staffers to hear how he had had "raw meat for breakfast" when asking whether he had any blood on his lips. Perhaps so accustomed to being ignored and poorly treated by the industry, media, and SEC itself, perhaps Markopolos felt the need to punish the idiots directly himself. I found it a turn-off and reminiscent of school-yard score-settling.

So too was the overuse of excessively repetitive metaphors, especially near the end: "Couldn't find their behind with two hands," "Couldn't hit the ocean if they were standing in it," etc. The epilogue felt thrown together at the last minute. Worst of all was his persistent misspelling of "principal" as "principle". As a genius quant who no doubt considers himself principled, as a finance man who must periodically refer to interest and principal, it was terribly grating to find him consistently using 'principle' when he meant 'principal' and further tarnished his credibility. He, his proofreaders, his editor, his publisher couldn't at least catch that?

Markopolos castigates the SEC (deservedly) for incompetence and failure to investigate Madoff, even when offered multiple opportunities. But I wonder, perhaps, did the people at the SEC find Markopolos arrogant and condescending when reading his submissions, or meeting him in person? Did Markopolos insult others as he did throughout his book? Was his quantitative genius perhaps overshadowed by a frustrated demeanor making him seem less credible? Would Meaghan Cheung of the SEC have even tried to check out Markopolos' arguments or asked superiors for help if she herself weren't made to feel foolish?

I didn't really learn a whole lot new from the book, except about SEC incompetence drilled into the reader over and over and over, than from the excellent coverage by the Wall Street Journal.

posted by Fred_T on June 16, 2010

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  • Posted June 16, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Fell Far Short of Expectations

    I'm afraid I was terribly disappointed by No One Would Listen. Markopolos clearly has an important story to tell and was at the center of team that uncovered Madoff nearly a decade before anyone else. There is no doubt Markopolos exposed not only Madoff but critical, systemic failures of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

    But the writing was thick with Markopolos' arrogance and condescension, and it is clear he remains bitter his arguments were not taken seriously years earlier. That is certainly understandable. But I found his credibility somewhat diminished by vengeance to bring the SEC to its knees--which he did in spades. Someone who prides himself in honesty and the fairness of markets needn't have resorted to the self-serving tactics he resorted to--before his Congressional testimony, gratuitously speaking loudly enough for SEC staffers to hear how he had had "raw meat for breakfast" when asking whether he had any blood on his lips. Perhaps so accustomed to being ignored and poorly treated by the industry, media, and SEC itself, perhaps Markopolos felt the need to punish the idiots directly himself. I found it a turn-off and reminiscent of school-yard score-settling.

    So too was the overuse of excessively repetitive metaphors, especially near the end: "Couldn't find their behind with two hands," "Couldn't hit the ocean if they were standing in it," etc. The epilogue felt thrown together at the last minute. Worst of all was his persistent misspelling of "principal" as "principle". As a genius quant who no doubt considers himself principled, as a finance man who must periodically refer to interest and principal, it was terribly grating to find him consistently using 'principle' when he meant 'principal' and further tarnished his credibility. He, his proofreaders, his editor, his publisher couldn't at least catch that?

    Markopolos castigates the SEC (deservedly) for incompetence and failure to investigate Madoff, even when offered multiple opportunities. But I wonder, perhaps, did the people at the SEC find Markopolos arrogant and condescending when reading his submissions, or meeting him in person? Did Markopolos insult others as he did throughout his book? Was his quantitative genius perhaps overshadowed by a frustrated demeanor making him seem less credible? Would Meaghan Cheung of the SEC have even tried to check out Markopolos' arguments or asked superiors for help if she herself weren't made to feel foolish?

    I didn't really learn a whole lot new from the book, except about SEC incompetence drilled into the reader over and over and over, than from the excellent coverage by the Wall Street Journal.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2014

    Repetetitive

    Very very poorly written. Repeats phrases literally 5 pages apart. " eventually I would file". Pgs 135,140.. lol by far the lowlight of this book was the whole bounty program within whistleblowing. He makes it beyond clear he desires the bounty, then will turn about face and say he has given up hope for a reward. The read became unbearable around the 120 pg mark.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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