Customer Reviews for

No Right to Remain Silent: The Tragedy at Virginia Tech

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2013

    I read this book to my husband on a drive across country. I thou

    I read this book to my husband on a drive across country. I thought this book was a story about the Virginia Tech shootings, but as I read it to my husband we realized it was a book about the author.  Fewer I's and more story would have been much better. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2009

    "J'accuse"

    "No Right to Remain Silent"

    It is seldom that a writer of serious fiction transfers those skills to a serious incident in real life. "In Cold Blood" might be an example.

    Lucinda Roy's "No Right to Remain Silent" explores the academic, bureaucratic, causal and deterministic matters surrounding the "Cho" massacre at Virginia Tech in 2007. It is written from her own personal contacts with Cho and her experiences with the principal player and the society in which he lived and died.

    Given the recent (July 2009) amazing discovery of Cho's records from his triage interviews with the University's Counseling Center, her book reveals the anatomy of a moment surrounded by "nacht und nebel". Her book blows away the dark and mist. It is written with the courage and insight that the French writer, Zola, had in his famous series, "J'accuse".

    "Emile Zola, a French writer, risked his career in 1898, when his "J'accuse" was published on the front page of the Paris daily, L'Aurore. The newspaper was run by Georges Clemenceau, who decided that the controversial story would be in the form of an open letter to the President. (Clemenceau became Prime Minister in 1917)
    Zola's "J'accuse" accused the highest bureaucratic levels of obstruction of justice regarding the controversial handling of a situation. As Zola was a leading French thinker, his letter formed a major turning-point in the affair.

    Zola was brought to trial for criminal libel in 1898, and was convicted, sentenced, and removed from the Legion of Honor. Zola fled to England. He was allowed to return in time to see the government's fall when public sentiment forced a change in the bureacratic cover-up." (adapted from Wikipedia)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2009

    More about author's axe to grind with Virginia Tech

    I appreciate that the author was put in an awkward position dealing with her knowledge of the killer, and an uncooperative administration, but I'm not interested in reading about it. The book was more about her and the confusion she seemed to suffer over the administration's response to the tragedy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2009

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    Posted April 29, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

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