BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Now, Discover Your Strengths: How to Develop Your Talents and Those of the People You Manage

Average Rating 4
( 71 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(31)

4 Star

(22)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

A point well taken, but...

The idea of the book is to help you find your talents, build your strengths, which will in turn, improve your performance.

Building your strengths is indeed somthing that is often overlooked, as most of the time we seek to improve our weaknesses- that's a poin...
The idea of the book is to help you find your talents, build your strengths, which will in turn, improve your performance.

Building your strengths is indeed somthing that is often overlooked, as most of the time we seek to improve our weaknesses- that's a point well taken- and a good reason to buy the book. However two more things also need to be mentioned. First, why can't we work on building both our strengths AND our weaknesses? In other words, why do we have to necessarily pick just one? I feel that many weaknesses can be improved upon.

Secondly, discovering your talents and doing what you're good at may not necessarily improve your performance. Why? Because there are lots of things we're good at, but still hate to do nonetheless. For instance, I'm really good at cleaning houses and debating, but I don't like to really do either one. People really perform well when its something that they know how to do AND when there's something meaningful/important in it for them. Anyway, just some food for thought. Readers may also be interested in The Sixty-Second Motivator.

posted by 240337 on October 27, 2008

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Good premise but little substance

The premise of the book is refreshing & rings true. However, after the 2nd read I realized that there is very little guidance given once you "discover your strengths." The treatment and description of the 34 possible themes is somewhat shallow. How do we apply these? Un...
The premise of the book is refreshing & rings true. However, after the 2nd read I realized that there is very little guidance given once you "discover your strengths." The treatment and description of the 34 possible themes is somewhat shallow. How do we apply these? Unfortunately that question is not adequately addressed. The book is of little use as a management tool unless you have your entire staff take the survey - which can only be accomplished by purchasing the book for each person. I find it disappointing that I was only allowed to take the survey once, & then only shown the top 5 themes. Am I to take these 5 themes on blind faith, without validating the results again in 6 months or a year? I find that somewhat disturbing, particlularly since the survey lacks any convincing documentation of its validity. I am forced to conclude that the book is primarily a marketing scam. Do we really need a survey to discover our talents? If I had it to do over again, I would buy the premise, but not the book!

posted by Anonymous on September 9, 2002

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 71 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 4
  • Posted September 14, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    I LOVE THIS BOOK! Marcus Buckingham speaks of how in our culture

    I LOVE THIS BOOK!
    Marcus Buckingham speaks of how in our culture we are all well acquainted with our weaknesses, and we seek ways to compensate for these. We learn how to improve on what we are not really naturally talented at and try to fix ourselves. But when it comes to our strengths we are at a loss for detailed descriptions, and most of the time we are not even aware of our strongest talents. This book suggests we invest in our strengths and talents, in those things that we are especially good at and enjoy doing most. Their approach is scientific and based on an open survey they did with 2 million people that are working successfully in their field. It comes along with an online "Strengthfinder Test" and I discovered things about myself, that I hadn't been noticing as special before. I highly recommend this book to everyone!!
    And if you like this idea you will also enjoy reading "Working On Yourself Doesn't Work" by Ariel and Shya Kane (link below). Their approach is less business oriented, but is definitely helpful in all areas of your life.
    It's time we all discover our own greatness instead of picking on ourselves - it's the best way to stop picking on others!

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    A point well taken, but...

    The idea of the book is to help you find your talents, build your strengths, which will in turn, improve your performance. <BR/><BR/>Building your strengths is indeed somthing that is often overlooked, as most of the time we seek to improve our weaknesses- that's a point well taken- and a good reason to buy the book. However two more things also need to be mentioned. First, why can't we work on building both our strengths AND our weaknesses? In other words, why do we have to necessarily pick just one? I feel that many weaknesses can be improved upon. <BR/><BR/>Secondly, discovering your talents and doing what you're good at may not necessarily improve your performance. Why? Because there are lots of things we're good at, but still hate to do nonetheless. For instance, I'm really good at cleaning houses and debating, but I don't like to really do either one. People really perform well when its something that they know how to do AND when there's something meaningful/important in it for them. Anyway, just some food for thought. Readers may also be interested in The Sixty-Second Motivator.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2002

    Good premise but little substance

    The premise of the book is refreshing & rings true. However, after the 2nd read I realized that there is very little guidance given once you "discover your strengths." The treatment and description of the 34 possible themes is somewhat shallow. How do we apply these? Unfortunately that question is not adequately addressed. The book is of little use as a management tool unless you have your entire staff take the survey - which can only be accomplished by purchasing the book for each person. I find it disappointing that I was only allowed to take the survey once, & then only shown the top 5 themes. Am I to take these 5 themes on blind faith, without validating the results again in 6 months or a year? I find that somewhat disturbing, particlularly since the survey lacks any convincing documentation of its validity. I am forced to conclude that the book is primarily a marketing scam. Do we really need a survey to discover our talents? If I had it to do over again, I would buy the premise, but not the book!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2013

    I bought this book new to take the online test. cut the paper ou

    I bought this book new to take the online test. cut the paper out of the book as instructed and opened sealed paper to find out the code inside wasn't valid. Very, very disappointed big waste of money!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Encouraging

    Now, Discover Your Strengths is empowering, but get Finding Heroes by Larry Dillon it will help you not just find the best people for your business, but its thoughtful and reaches you on both personal and professional levels. I recommend both books, but you'll find a hero in Dillon's book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2008

    Do not buy used if you want to take the online test!!

    I bought this book used. I was very excited to take the online test only to discover that each book has a code to excess the online test that is only valid for one user. I guess someone who bought this book used could still get something good out it if they wanted to guess their theme. But even after I guessed my theme I was left feeling unsatisfied. This book is very vague and in my opinion a waist of money.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2006

    Better than most 'Score Your Aptitude' books

    This book is in the same vein as many of the 'score your aptitude' line of career self-help. Most of what you will find out about your strengths you probably already know. What This book does that most others don't is to provide more concrete help in identifying the ATTRIBUTES of the roles and jobs that will fit to your strengths, instead of suggesting particular jobs or careers. In fact some of the annecdotal examples in the book demonstrate how the same Strength can be leveraged in divergent careers and roles. By far the most valuable part of this book for me was the section on 'how to build a Strengths Based Organization'. In it, each of the 'strengths' is enumerated, and a recommendation is given on how to best engage, motivate and manage someone with that strength. The value in this was to provide a language with which to communicate to MY manager what I would like to get from my job and my company. Essentially by reversing the 'how to build' section, you can more easily arrive at a common language of what value you bring to your manager, and how s/he can keep you interested, engaged and committed to your tasks even if the overall job you are in isn't the perfect fit for your strengths.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2004

    Some great humanistic ideas. Online Q's to in-the-box

    Author presents some great ideas, although excludes God, or any spiritual forces from any influence in who you are, or the decisions you make. Still, Christians should be able to gain value in some of the helpful ideas. Focusing on our weaknesses is the devils interest. Focusing on our strengths (God being one of them notably not mentioned in the book) is our responsability. Online questions don't let you answer a valid response. For example: a person who can excite others can often also calm them down. Saying you are neutral isn't applicable to the question. Others should also be able to purchase the online component, if they want to read the book. (They're not all going to buy the book, but they would pay for the test)

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2003

    You'll wonder how you got along without this book.

    I'm a personal and professional development coach, and this book is my Bible. It's that good. I've seen clients make dramatic and successful changes in their lives as a result of the informaion in this book. The theory -- that we don't know our strengths, or know them all too well and have been conditioned to consider them weaknesses -- holds true. I was even surprised myself when I took the assessment (code is in book). When you take the assessment, you'll receive back your top 5 signature themes, and these are 34 new terms coined by the authors such as Focus, Activator, Deliberative, Empathy, Relator and Strategic. The book, geared toward management, gives you a description of each strength, and then tells you how to "manage" each type. This of course applies to your social life as well as your work life. When you build your life around your strengths, you can achieve consistent near-excellence most of the time without a drain on your energy. Give it a try! Then give it to your manager and your spouse. You'll benefit greatly.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2001

    good ideas, poor execution

    I'm happy a book makes it so high on the bestseller list explaining to people that they are better off focusing on strengths (both for themselves, as for the organizations they work for). At jobEQ.com, we have been 'educating' our customers to do the same, and as the authors of this book acknowledge, only 25 to 40% of persons will grasp that notion immediately. I also appreciate that the authors explain how a manager can use the knowledge of these strengths (or themes) to manage their staff better. If the authors would write a second edition, there are some things that I would recommend them to address. My first remark is linked to the writing style: this book is written in an 'imperative' form: it contains a lot of sentences with 'you need to do this', 'you should do that', ... This style tends to put of people, risking that they miss the message. Secondly, they have WRONG, OUTDATED notion of the brain: contrary to what people used to say 5 to 10 years ago, the good news of recent research is that brain cells that die off ARE replaced (even if you get older) and you remain capable of forming new connections between brain cells (maybe unless you get a disease, such as Parkinson, ...). Thirdly: the book does not really address what kind of job would be good for you. Finally some feedback about the test: don't take it BEFORE you read chapter 3 in the book - at least then you will understand how they built it. Still, I have my doubts about the way it is built. Using the amount of interviews as a 'proof of credibility' didn't impress me: Often for scientific purposes, it doesn't matter much if you did 5.000 or a million interviews - all that matters is that you can validate the test. Also, I know that most people probably have MORE than 5 strengths, which is just an ARBITRARY number Gallup chose. Given the importance they address to these 5 strengths, just imagine what opportunities you will miss by ignoring these other strengths. I would rather prefer to get a FULL picture, getting all my strengths and weaknesses, and having this information ordered from strongest to weakest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2001

    Know thyself...

    The book launches on an ambitious effort to counter the modern mindset of immersing ourselves with seminars and books to learn skills that we don't naturally possess. Buckingham and Clifton's premise is that you have developed-skills and learned abilities which may allow you to execute basic functions with focused effort and subsequent energy drain. However, they propose your strengths and energies are best served by capitalizing on your talents... the recurring pattern of thought, feeling or behavior that can be productively applied (e.g. inquisitive, competitive, harmony, connectedness, etc...). They espouse that talents are those things you can see yourself doing repeatedly, happily and successfully. To allow the reader to effectively find their talents, the authors introduce a new 'dictionary' of terminology that takes the time to explain and illustrate each talent thoroughly. The book goes into physiological, psychological and emotional detail to help you drill down and analyze yourself at a new level to assess what you are really passionate about. Even if you already know the answer to these questions, it's a good exercise to reawaken your spirit and revitalize your ambition.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    I bought the NOOK Book version of this with the expectation of i

    I bought the NOOK Book version of this with the expectation of it including the online code. To my surprise, and contrary to what it says in the overview of the book, the code was not included. Needles to say, I am very disappointed . Please be warned that you may have an issue receiving the code with the NOOK Book version. Not sure if this was a human error, or not, but this will be returned. Good Luck!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Changed My Life!

    This book literally changed my life and the way I began to raise my children! The premise that we are innately born with certain strengths isn't new (Myers-Briggs is one such test) but this book goes a step further. It allows you to take a test online with a code printed inside the book that gives you your top 5 strengths in accurate detail.

    The fact that we are always trying to work on our weaknesses to make them stronger doesn't make sense. It is better for us to use our God-given strengths, because when we do, we are happier and more fulfilled. Work won't feel like work if you do this!

    It helped me notice my children's strengths and encourage them to further those. This can be done at any age! Additionally, I put my top 5 strengths (condensed, not detailed) onto my resume. I cannot tell you how many times a prospective employer has appreciated this addition to my professional portfolio.

    This is a purchase you won't regret!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2009

    Fabulous!!!

    Insightful and gives great info on own personal strengths. Would recommend buying the Strengths 2.0 version instead of this older version.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Exactly What I Needed!

    An eye opener if there ever was one! Not only does it help you to become a better manager and leader but better understand your own professional and personal strengths. Definitely a must read for anyone open to maximizing their strengths on a daily basis.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

    A good foundation for employee development/career planning

    A good foundation for employee development/career planning

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2009

    Our strengths are key

    Our strengths are key to our performance and Buckingham illustrates this point very well. I would also recommend Full Throttle by Dr. Gregg Steinberg for more information on how to use your strengths.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Insightful and thought provoking.

    In a world of "me too" self help books this one dares to say work on what works and don't worry so much about what does not work. This process requires an honest assessment of ones strengths as the results can be easily manipulated to pander to one's preconceived notions of self.

    It requires computer access and constant cross-checking one's results. I highly recommend this book for those looking to really hone in on strengths and wanting to make them stronger. This is not for those wanting to fix weaknesses.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Read

    I didn't realize all the different strengths that I had till I read this book. By getting in touch with my strengths and who I am the impact on my professional life has been a great one. I would reccomend this book to everyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Look in the Mirror

    As a corporate human resources director, I often work on developing the latent talents and skills of various managers. Years ago, I taught a class where I had each participant to look into a hand-held mirror and ask the question, "Would you want to work for this person?" <BR/><BR/>This book takes this exercise to a completely different level. To discover your own inner strengths (and weakness) ensures that you will become the very best manager possible. As a fan of First, Break All the Rules, I was very satisfied that this follow-up was as timely and useful as the first book. I highly recommend you purchase a copy of this book for yourself and for all of your managers. Michael L. Gooch, SPHR

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 71 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 4