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Officer Buckle & Gloria

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 31 of 31 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2002

    I laughed out loud...

    A wonderful book with terrific illustrations and a great message. We are using this book in an injury prevention program in our schools.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2001

    Safety Tips and Lessons in Cooperation from a Slapstick Duo!

    Most of us learn best when we are laughing, and this book should provide lots of encouragement to learning through laughter. The humor is aimed just perfectly for the 3-6 year old set to be totally fascinated. The humor has a serious purpose. You learn many valuable safety tips, the benefits of teamwork, and the importance of communicating in an interesting way. 'Officer Buckle knew more safety tips than anyone else in Napville.' 'Every time he thought of a new one, he thumbtacked it to his bulletin board.' 'Safety tip #77 NEVER stand on a SWIVEL CHAIR.' Naturally, the book has the principal doing this all the time. There was a problem though. When Officer Buckle shared his tips with the students at school, they fell asleep. And there were more accidents than ever! One day the police department bought a police dog named Gloria. Officer Buckle took her to school. Whenever Officer Buckle would describe a potential danger, Gloria would pantomime the outcome in a humorous way. The children loved it! (and so will yours). Officer Buckle didn't realize why the children were paying attention until he saw a presentation televised. He grew angry. 'I'm not giving any more speeches! Nobody looks at me, anyway!' So the school requested that Gloria come by herself. But that was a bad idea. She just 'sat on stage looking lonely.' Then 'she fell asleep, so did the audience.' After Gloria left, the Napville School had its biggest accident ever. 'It started with a puddle of banana pudding . . . .' A letter comes to Officer Buckle saying, 'Gloria missed you yesterday!' Officer Buckle and Gloria made up. Officer Buckle 'thought of his best safety tip yet . . . .' 'Safety Tip #101' 'ALWAYS STICK WITH YOUR BUDDY!' This book won Ms. Peggy Rathmann the Caldecott Medal for the best illustrated children's book of 1996. Three elements undoubtedly contributed to that award. First, her people are very funny to behold in their bright colors and round features. Second, she creates motion exceptionally well (captured here with slapstick pratfalls and pantomimes). Third, every scene screams for you to giggle. This book should work better than antidepressant medicine for creating a sunny mood. After you finish enjoying the story, you and your child should discuss how learning can be made more fun for both of you. This book should give you some great ideas for skits as one way to express yourselves. Use laughing experiences to help bring home serious messages . . . always! Donald Mitchell, co-author of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2000

    The Children Love It!!!

    I am a Police Officer in New Garden Township, Pennsylvania as well as being a School Resource Officer for that area. Part of my duties is to interact with the children in my Schools. I have read this book numerous times and enjoy it every time I read it. Most importantly the Children enjoy this book. I am going too get a copy of this book for my own children to enjoy at home. Peace to all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2000

    Funny and interesting

    My daughter has read this book with me several times and still laughs out loud at Gloria's antics, especially in the first 'thumbtack' scene. It's so wonderful to hear the belly laughs of a usually fairly serious 3 yo enjoying this book. My 5 yo daughter enjoys reading the safety tips so charmingly illustrated by the pooch in the endpapers. The safety issues are valuable here, but they aren't the first things we think or talk about. We love Gloria, and we love the message of 'never turn your back on your buddy.' I've found this book to be a good starting point for talking about friendship and the intentions of our friends. Officer Buckle was very hurt and offended when he learned what Gloria did during his talks (a classic hang-dog look in that scene), but he learns that she didn't intend to hurt him and actually helps and enhances his work. Who doesn't feel misunderstood at some point? Clearly Gloria was, and happily her buddy realised that. What more could we ask for? (other than another equally good book with Gloria?)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2000

    Wonderful book!

    I enjoyed this Caldecott winner. The story livens up the safety concept and the illustrations are perfect!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2000

    Critical Analysis of Officer Buckles and Gloria

    Since my knowledge of picture books is relatively little, I chose to focus on qualities such as brightness, color, size, and text while reading Officer Buckle and Gloria. In 1995, Peggy Rathmann won the Caldecott medal for her excellent illustrations of the clumsy police officer and the amazing dog. I chose this book for my critical reflection because the cover was colorful and simple. All of the qualities I mentioned before are present in Officer Buckles and Gloria, which is important when reviewing the book. One of the first things I realized before even reading the book that Gloria was the star of the book and Officer Buckle only dreamed of being in the limelight. This is obvious from the cover of the book, which places the children's eyes on Gloria who is taking a flying leap on the stage. The next page is bright yellow and contains safety tips in stars that relate good messages to children. The title page uses the same font and style as the cover of the book, which is also the case with Where the Wild Things Are. The same font is used throughout the book except when the author wants to stress a safety tip. The pictures and text throughout the book are humorous containing different accidents Officer Buckle must make note of. Officer Buckles bores the students with his safety speeches until the arrival of Gloria. The show livens up and Officer Buckles assumes it is he, but it is Gloria causing the children's laughter. When he finds out he is saddened by the news and refuses to return. The show is a bomb without him and because of the disasters that occur, he decides to return. I found the story itself to be sad because of the treatment Officer Buckles received from the children. There were thirty pages in the book all of which contained text and illustrations. This approach is different from that taken by Maurice Sendak, who chose to change his characters and text position with the turning of every page. In comparison to Where the Wild Things Are, this picture book has a much different style which only implies the difference in the authors. In Children's Literature Association Quarterly, there was a very interesting article by Jennifer Shaddock, on Where the Wild Things Are. This critical review examines the cultural influence of Sendak's book. Shaddock argues that Sendak '¿ offers us not only a psychological model of maturation, but a cultural one as well.' (Shaddock, pg159) This is apparent in Max's journey to a native land where he controls the wild things. The role of dominance Max plays is not a harmful message to send out to readers. Some of the same characteristics are found in Officer Buckle and Gloria, but most similar is that the messages are both positive. Both Sendak and Rathmann incorporate text and a vivid set of pictures that creates a wonderful picture book for children. Overall, I found Rathmann's picture book quite humorous and the pictures extremely creative. However, I have seen other picture books I found more interesting and complex.

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    Posted March 16, 2009

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    Posted February 26, 2010

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    Posted January 9, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

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    Posted October 14, 2012

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 31 of 31 Customer Reviews
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