Customer Reviews for

On Hitler's Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood

Average Rating 3.5
( 27 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

A book you will remember!

Some interesting memoirs are not exciting reads, but I thought this one was extremely well written. I enjoy reading about all aspects of WWII and this book makes you feel like you're taking a step back in time to a childhood in Nazi Germany.

posted by momof2TN on June 16, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

An Insightful Read with a Different Perspective

Irmgard Hunt's On Hitler's Mountain gives the reader an exclusive insight of an average German family during the Nazi's rule in Germany. Irmgard begins with her family's history, tracing back to her parents's childhoods and eventually to her own birth into Nazi Germany....
Irmgard Hunt's On Hitler's Mountain gives the reader an exclusive insight of an average German family during the Nazi's rule in Germany. Irmgard begins with her family's history, tracing back to her parents's childhoods and eventually to her own birth into Nazi Germany. She grew up in the small town of Berchtesgaden, which sits close to a mountain on which the Eagle's Nest and Hitler's private house called the Berghof were located. Hitler and several elite Nazis lived on this mountain. When she was a little girl, Irmgard and her family went up the mountain to see Hitler in a public rally-like gathering. At this gathering, Hitler chose Irmgard to sit on his knee and pose for a picture. Irmgard's one time special treatment and close proximity to Nazi leadership did not shield her from the realities of life in Nazi Germany. She and her family lived a very frugal life and had to live on the pitiful government-regulated rations of food, especially during the war. In addition, she and her family were subjected to Nazi propaganda in the forms of community service for the Führer, harsh Nazi teachers, and frequent radio broadcasts that aimed at maintaining control of the people. She endured bombings on her hometown. When the allied powers defeated the Nazis, Irmgard and her family had to adjust to several changes in their life because of the occupation of their homeland. Despite Germany's defeat, Irmgard, her family, and many German people residing in Berchtesgaden were all relieved that the war had finally ended. Thus, not all Germans wanted what Hitler and the Nazis wanted. From a thematic standpoint, Irmgard makes a point to address how human the average German was during this time. That is, not every German was a Nazi who wanted death to Jews and world domination. Rather, many of them were simply following orders out of force. She also expressed how the working class is often easily controlled. Despite this book's important message, it did have a few downsides. For instance, it was rather boring in spots; she described things that could have been left out for their lack of meaning. Also, some of the syntax is a little unusual so that it makes it difficult to understand at times. Perhaps this is due to her first language being German. Some pleasing things about this book were the plain language and the supplemental photographs. This book is not for a pleasure-reader, rather, it is for someone writing a research paper who might need some specific evidence on a German's perspective of World War II. A pleasure-reader would be bored to tears half-way through. Also, Irmgard's memoir does convey an important theme, but this theme is already accepted by most people in today's society, making it a little unnecessary to read this memoir. For a more pleasurable reading experience, someone may want to read Germany 1945: From War to Peace or Valkyrie.

posted by 4765200 on September 22, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2010

    An Insightful Read with a Different Perspective

    Irmgard Hunt's On Hitler's Mountain gives the reader an exclusive insight of an average German family during the Nazi's rule in Germany. Irmgard begins with her family's history, tracing back to her parents's childhoods and eventually to her own birth into Nazi Germany. She grew up in the small town of Berchtesgaden, which sits close to a mountain on which the Eagle's Nest and Hitler's private house called the Berghof were located. Hitler and several elite Nazis lived on this mountain. When she was a little girl, Irmgard and her family went up the mountain to see Hitler in a public rally-like gathering. At this gathering, Hitler chose Irmgard to sit on his knee and pose for a picture. Irmgard's one time special treatment and close proximity to Nazi leadership did not shield her from the realities of life in Nazi Germany. She and her family lived a very frugal life and had to live on the pitiful government-regulated rations of food, especially during the war. In addition, she and her family were subjected to Nazi propaganda in the forms of community service for the Führer, harsh Nazi teachers, and frequent radio broadcasts that aimed at maintaining control of the people. She endured bombings on her hometown. When the allied powers defeated the Nazis, Irmgard and her family had to adjust to several changes in their life because of the occupation of their homeland. Despite Germany's defeat, Irmgard, her family, and many German people residing in Berchtesgaden were all relieved that the war had finally ended. Thus, not all Germans wanted what Hitler and the Nazis wanted. From a thematic standpoint, Irmgard makes a point to address how human the average German was during this time. That is, not every German was a Nazi who wanted death to Jews and world domination. Rather, many of them were simply following orders out of force. She also expressed how the working class is often easily controlled. Despite this book's important message, it did have a few downsides. For instance, it was rather boring in spots; she described things that could have been left out for their lack of meaning. Also, some of the syntax is a little unusual so that it makes it difficult to understand at times. Perhaps this is due to her first language being German. Some pleasing things about this book were the plain language and the supplemental photographs. This book is not for a pleasure-reader, rather, it is for someone writing a research paper who might need some specific evidence on a German's perspective of World War II. A pleasure-reader would be bored to tears half-way through. Also, Irmgard's memoir does convey an important theme, but this theme is already accepted by most people in today's society, making it a little unnecessary to read this memoir. For a more pleasurable reading experience, someone may want to read Germany 1945: From War to Peace or Valkyrie.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A book you will remember!

    Some interesting memoirs are not exciting reads, but I thought this one was extremely well written. I enjoy reading about all aspects of WWII and this book makes you feel like you're taking a step back in time to a childhood in Nazi Germany.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2010

    Good read!

    An excellent first person account of what it was like to grow up German during the Third Reich in the mountains where Hitler and his inner circle chose to build a compound for pleasure and safety. The author chronicles her life growing up in an idyllic mountain town that is dramatically changed by war and the presence of Hitler. As a child, she must grasp the changing political climate as the adults around her are often at odds with each other regarding Hitler and his policies. She has a chance meeting with Hitler and is photographed with him. Well written and insightful. Provides a point of view that is not as often shared.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2006

    A View from a Different Angle

    I found this book interesting in that it was told from the perspective of a child not only born on the cusp of Naziism, but near Berchtesgaden (the site of Hitler's camp). Though not as horrific as an Auschwitz survivor's account of what happened during that period of history, it too tells of a chilling and depressing time when humanitarianism seemed all but gone.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 17, 2013

    A great read that SHOULD be accompanied with the NOOK App OBERS

    A great read that SHOULD be accompanied with the NOOK App OBERSALTZBURG> This gives photos and the layout of everything on Hitlers Mountain.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    Excellent book for those wanting a "average German" perspective on the war

    While the author can only speak about the war from the perspective of a child, this is perhaps the best book I've read that talks about how/why "average" Germans got sucked into the events that occurred during WWII. This book gives tremendous insight into what life was like for ordinary people in Germany during this time, and their reactions and feelings about their involvement after the war.

    The book is well-written, moves at a good pace, and provides a unique and very interesting perspective to the events of that era. Thank you to Ms. Hunt for sharing her story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    The memories of a Child

    The author shares her childhood living in the shadow of the Third Reich, and the loss of her father in the war. The author opens a window for the reader to peak in and see Hitler through her childhood eyes. It is a fascinating read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2013

    What an awesome book. The author gives us an insight I've never

    What an awesome book. The author gives us an insight I've never before understood. This book is a lesson beyond just history. I couldn't put it down. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    A haunting, courageous memoir

    Hunt's story kept me engaged from cover to cover. She didn't just tell a chronological story, she took me with her through each year of her life on Hitler's mountain. Excellent read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    Cant belive

    I havent read this and this might not be in the book but i can not belive that a mommas boy would do something like kill a bunch of jews because they were jewish he should of died oh wait he did but he still should of been gased i rest my case

    0 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 15, 2011

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    Posted June 3, 2012

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    Posted August 27, 2009

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    Posted November 9, 2011

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    Posted November 10, 2011

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    Posted September 22, 2010

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    Posted December 30, 2013

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    Posted September 28, 2009

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    Posted March 20, 2009

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    Posted September 7, 2013

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