Customer Reviews for

On Sparrow Hill

Average Rating 4
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted December 15, 2011

    If you enjoy England and historical romance, this book is for you!

    LOVED this book. Didn't want it to end. Great transition from Oak Leaves. Lovely story of God's presence and promises.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2012

    Significant

    I just finished reading both books and had been extremelly impresed on how the author was able to develop such a difficult theme into a possitive learning experience and the relation she was able to trace together withing past and present and the beautiful involvement of God throughout both books. These books are amazing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 14, 2011

    Really Good Story

    I read the first book on this series and liked it so much that I decided to read the second one. Like the first book, this story is very well written and keeps the reader interested in what´s going to happen next. I like the way the author goes back and forth between the characters that lived in old England and the contemporary characters. I highly recommend it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2008

    A reviewer

    After reading The Oak Leaves by Maureen Lang, I was delighted to find the sequel, On Sparrow Hill. In another parallel story, Maureen Lang uses Cosima's letters from 1849 to bring the news of the family affliction to more of her current day ancestors in contemporary England. Can they rise above the family curse to find lasting happiness that only faith in God can bring? I personally recommend this book. It is more than a love story with a lesson on leaning on God.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2008

    Don't miss this author!

    When reading Maureen Lang¿s book, On Sparrow Hill, one feels like you are ¿there¿ living the events along with the characters. Empathy, excitement, intrigue, love, and excitement are just a few words that describe feelings evoked. Ms. Lang has the ability to weave and unfold a story involving the past and the present leaving the reader wanting to know the result of how they come together. One feels empathy while reading of the fears and challenges of raising a special needs child. A delightful addition is the word pictures painted such as the ¿cuddle farm¿ where the sheep live. Wonderful reading!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2008

    a lovely romance

    Okay I admit I took one look at the cover and thought to myself, 'oh its one of those stories' it looked like a soft romance story and well I love romance but I normally like a little action in mine. I will admit that I really liked this story once Quinten and Rebecca found the old letters and it transformed us back in time. I really thought that Maureen Lang handled the switching back and forth from historical setting to modern day very well, not once did I fill confused and I was always interested to see what was going on in both settings. I liked the use of the fragile X from the past coming into the future with Dana's sister kid, it brought it to life more having it in both settings. I loved the story about Quentin(high class) and Rebecca(lower class) and how they got past the class differences. Over all it was a great story and I really didn't want it to end. Two thumbs up :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2008

    Not just another novel...

    This is a wonderful book to follow 'Oak Leaves.' I went through a whole range of emotions while reading 'On Sparrow Hill': happiness, sadness, conviction, being challenged, etc. Great romance, too! I will read this again and again!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    Nice Book

    Not my normal timeframe to read but enjoyed this book

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  • Posted December 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Hard to get into

    I had a hard time getting into this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 18, 2011

    couldn't do it

    If I can't get invested in the book in the first two chapters, it's not going to happen. Never got past the first two chapters...but it was free, so nothing lost.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2011

    Good

    This was an okay book - good insight on the way "mentally diminished" people were treated. And, the book had a good ending. It isn't the usual genre I read, but I did enjoy it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2011

    On Sparrow Hill...

    What I liked about this story was how every character showed their faith in God and used that faith to shape their lives. They left all of their problems, worries, and future in the hands of God knowing he had everything planned out for them.

    What I didn't like in the book was the character Katie. Even after knowing what kind of person she was and knowing her problem, her character seemed to get annoying, especially when she was part of a problem that occured in the story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2011

    Sweet

    A wonderfully, sweet Christian story that proves that God has a path for us all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2008

    Endearing Family Love Story

    Maureen Lang once again proves her ability to tell a great story and write a great sequel. On Sparrow Hill is the continuation of the family legacy she brought to us in The Oak Leaves. With some new characters and places, Maureen gave us two stories in one in the book, also. Rebecca Seabrooke is the curator for Quentin Hollingsworth's family estate. Her family has worked in this estate for generations and her goal is to preserve its history by making it the most successful historic home in the country. She must overcome the crush she has held on Quentin since their childhoods. They aren't exactly from the same class, after all. Quentin Hollingsworth understands the treasure he has in Rebecca's work as curator, but also in her friendship. When the two of them discover a package of letters in the family vault, written years ago by one of his ancestors, it changes the course of both of their lives. Rebecca and Quentin discover both of their histories are linked and as they uncover family secrets, meet cousins from the United States, and learn that sometimes God's perfect plan is found in the most amazing imperfections, they also find love that crosses classes and time. This book is tender love and grace at its best. Maureen Lang take the challenges of life and makes them into beautiful family treasures. Open the pages of this book and meet characters that will touch your heart and affect your life long after you read the last page.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2008

    A Sequel Worth the Reading

    Rebecca Seabrooke is committed to her work as the curator for the Hollingsworth Estate, an important British family. Secretly, Rebecca has had a crush on Quentin Hollingsworth since childhood. Now he seems interested in her. Could there possibly be a future for them? Of course, the times are different, but could nobility and the servant class become an item without stirring idle gossip? And what of Quentin¿s thoroughbred mother? Respected for her family¿s long history of service to the Hollingsworth, could Rebecca find acceptance as an equal? When 150-year old letters, written by Berrie Hamilton, one of Quentin¿s ancestors, are fount in a vault, Rebecca is reminded that hurdles can be jumped with God¿s help and wisdom. Maureen Lang, in this sequel to The Oak Leaves, has once again weaved engaging parallel stories: that of Berrie Hamilton¿s quest to help a young mentally impaired girl find meaning within her disability, and that of Rebecca Seabrooke¿s struggle against conventionality. Berrie writes her sister-in-law Cosima regarding the hardships she faces as she works to establish an Irish school for the mentally challenged. She fights against an uncaring system and is unwittingly pitted against the brother of one of her students, an Irish Lord. She dislikes her attraction to him. And he reminds her of his distrust of the English. When Quentin¿s English cousins visit, Rebecca is reminded of the struggle Cosima endured regarding her fears of the family curse, the fear of bearing a mentally disabled child. And indeed, in later years, the ancestral gene would carry the Fragile X-Syndrome, a theme prominent in Lang¿s first book, The Oak Leaves, and a reoccurring subplot in this book. A good read from start to finish.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    deep family drama

    England¿s National Trust constantly makes job offers that would pay much more and provide greater prestige, but Rebecca Seabrooke prefers to remain manager of Hollinworth Hall. Part of it might be her lingering crush on the owner Quentin Hollinworth, but much is because she needs to prove to herself she can run the best historical site in the country without dependence on her father. Her efforts are paying off as the manor has received a prestigious nomination from the Featherby Education Award although she hopes that proves enough to keep his mother from having him shut the place. An email arrives from West World Genealogy (WWG) in which they claim an American family wants to contact their English Hollinworth cousins as they possess an original 1852 diary belonging to Cosima Escott Hamilton, an ancestor of Quentin. Intrigued they visit the vault to find letters from that period written by Beryl ¿Berrie¿ Hamilton to Cosima. Meanwhile Dana Walker responds to Rebecca¿s email via WWG she claims she possesses Cosima¿s journal brought to America by the Englishwoman¿s youngest son Kip whom Dana says she is his descendent. As Rebecca and Quentin work on understanding his ancestors and hers who have serviced Hamiltons for twelve generations, they admit their love for one another, but his mother objects besides Rebecca believes Lady Caroline is more suited for her employer. --- Once again as Maureen Lang did with the deep family drama that focuses on Fragile X Syndrome and its impact on people (see THE OAK LEAVES), the author provides a powerful tale of two families during the Victorian and contemporary eras. In both periods the key characters seem genuine as comparisons of the aristocracy and their servicing class then and now between the times make for a fascinating drama. Whether it is Berrie opening up a school for the mentally retarded or Quentin¿s mom grieving the coming extinction of the aristocracy due to McDonalds and the Internet, readers will appreciate the well written poignant ON SPARROW HILL. --- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
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