Customer Reviews for

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Average Rating 4.5
( 387 )
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(206)

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(48)

2 Star

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

A timeless Classic thrills new Generations

The novel One Flew Over a Cuckoo¿s Nest is a dark, classic book that describes the journey of ex-prisoner Randle Patrick McMurphy and how he shakes up the life of a mental hospital after being sentenced as a patient himself. He claims to be insane but quickly shows his ...
The novel One Flew Over a Cuckoo¿s Nest is a dark, classic book that describes the journey of ex-prisoner Randle Patrick McMurphy and how he shakes up the life of a mental hospital after being sentenced as a patient himself. He claims to be insane but quickly shows his rebellious persona by challenging authority in the ward with his dramatic way to take over. The book maps his constant battle with the big nurse Ratched who is the overseeing power of the institution. Their combative ways is an eye-opening and compelling story line that shows the era of the 1960¿s was way different from today. The repetitive themes found in the book are standing up for one¿s self even if it is against a higher power and of course surviving the cruel, brain frying punishments executed in the disturbed ward. McMurphy is a brute and forceful man that has to push nurse Ratched¿s boundaries and break the rules to keep him from actually going crazy. I found myself riveted with the storyline and always wanting to turn the page to read what scheme McMurphy had dreamt up next to put into action. His interactions with the other patients was humorous and gave a clear picture of what life must have been like living with such twisted and physiologically disturbed people. McMurphy might not be considered the stereotyped ¿Hero¿ but is a timeless character who you want to see succeed nevertheless. Author Ken Kessey was not disillusioned into creating tragic endings. It is not a book for a younger audience or a feel good time. This book can measure up into being one of the greatest horror stories written and a perfect read during the Halloween season. If you enjoy this book as much as I did, I would recommend the following novels that give off the same eerie but page turning thrill; 1984 by George Orwell, Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Go ask Alice by Anonymous, or 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher. This book was an impeccable piece of writing with a shining 5 star quality. It is a longer read but the pages fly as the novel steadily peaks to the climax and shocking ending.

posted by Meagan_Traver on November 29, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

One Flew Over The Cukoo's Nest

One Flew Over The Cukoo's Nest is a novel by Ken Kesey. In this classic novel of the 1960's, Kesey's hero, Randle Patrick McMurphy, a convict rebel, enters the world of a mental hospital and takes over. McMurphy rallies the other patinents by trying to over rule the cru...
One Flew Over The Cukoo's Nest is a novel by Ken Kesey. In this classic novel of the 1960's, Kesey's hero, Randle Patrick McMurphy, a convict rebel, enters the world of a mental hospital and takes over. McMurphy rallies the other patinents by trying to over rule the cruel and manipulative, controlled leadership of Nurse Ratched. He gambles, promotes riots among patients and smuggles in wine and hookers. This novel is truely captivating. Many aspects of it are based on occurrences author Ken Kesey witnessed while working in an insane hospital in the 1950's-60's when experimentation of meth, LSD, etc. were in vogue. Juxtapposed the experimentation of EST and lobotomies. When the patients became united against the common evil of the ward's employees headed by Nurse Ratched their bonds grow deep. The characters despite their common problems, are likeable and surprisingly realistic, for example at the beginning the character Chief Broom feigns deaf and dumb. Under the leadership of McMurphy he comes out of his shell and becomes a part of this society. An unexpected ending adds to the book's costant thrill factor.

posted by Anonymous on May 3, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

    Get me a hot dog

    I do not read many fiction books. I could count on both hands the fiction books I have read other then Dickens the books I read I have already watch the movie. Like Green Mile , Godfather. This book ( koo's nest ) is the only one in my opinion the movie was better. I was wishing The Author told us more regarding the patient how they ended up their maybe did they get out.

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  • Posted January 30, 2014

    Favorite book of all time. As an author myself, I consider this

    Favorite book of all time. As an author myself, I consider this book the standard for modern fiction. It is highly entertaining, beautifully written and non-formulaic. The classic cast of characters are locked in a life and death spiral that is poured skillfully into each page. Kesey gives the reader a disturbingly realistic view of institutional corruption. All portrayed in a bold and unique style that commercial writers today have abandoned for the worse.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    Always wanted to read the book

    I bought this book because it is one of my Favorite movies,and I always wanted to read and own the book. It did not disappoint. It's a good book. and buying it on the nook was a good buy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Two words: ahhhh mazing

    Awesome book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2013

    Must Read

    I'm reading this book right now and its very good. At first I was confused but after a while it gets better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Me gusta

    Leelo! Estas bien. Me encanta.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2013

    Vynx

    YES!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

    Lost butterfly chapter 1

    Fluttershy cried for help hundreds of times it seemed until she finally collapsed into tears. She had no idea where she was, except that it was a forest. She had never felt so lonely, so alone in her life. She curled up in a ball as the moon rose higher inti the sky. Nopony, it seemed, could ever find or help her. Meanwhile... Applejack was telling Big Mcintosh that Fluttershy had gone missing. Mcintosh tried to remain calm and not bresk down, but instead of either he cried out " What?!" Applejack shook her head sadly. " yup. Shes gone without a trace. No evidence of where she might have gone." Mcintosh closed his eyes. Fluttershy was shy, like him. She was kind. She was sweet. She was beautiful. He realized then what girl he had a crush on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2013

    A readable classic

    If you haven't read this book now is the time! This is a great story. And it was made into a great movie. Mental health care has come a long way. Thank GOD !!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2013

    Classic

    Great read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2013

    Damn good book.

    The voice of this novel is quite incredible. Ken Kesey could really write!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    WOW!!

    WOW!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    Boringbg d ad i cant see the movie

    Hi o
    S

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    Great

    This book was amazing. I would highly recommend it to any friend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2013

    cghhjk

    cghhjk

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  • Posted January 26, 2013

    blah.

    blah.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    Chief Bromden, the half- Indian narrator, is a 10- year patient

    Chief Bromden, the half- Indian narrator, is a 10- year patient at a psychiatric hospital in Oregon. He suffers from hallucinogens and delusions. He fears the world is dominated by conformity. He pretends to be deaf and dumb. Randle McMurphy is the novel’s protagonist. He is a scarred, tattooed rebel that was transferred to the hospital from a prison work farm. He feels that the hospital is more comfortable than any prison he has been to. Nurse Ratched, the antagonist, is the head nurse of the ward. She is a woman with no femininity. She destroys the self- esteem of the patients, by draining their humanity. The main conflict in the story was Miss Ratched draining the humanity from the patients on her ward. While the Nurse is trying to weaken them, McMurphy is trying to lead the patients to rebel. In addition, Chief Bromden is trying to regain his old self as an individual. McMurphy had an encounter with the lifeguard, and discovered the meaning of being committed. 
    I like when McMurphy leads all of the patients on the ward to rebel. For example, when Nurse Ratched changes the television schedule, in contrast they stare at the blank screen, being defiant. Furthermore, I like how Bromden begins to regain his self confidence. For example, he speaks for the first time in 10 years, expressing all of his thoughts to McMurphy, as if he were his therapist. However, I do not like the flashbacks that occur during the story. For example, when Chief Bromden explains about his father, it takes the reader off topic, when wondering what is going on in the hospital. I would recommend this novel because Ken Kesey brings the story to life. The dull lives of patients living under a ward are made into a stimulating story.   His details of the characters’ and the hospital’s description create a picture. 

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  • Posted June 16, 2012

    Didn't love it

    I didn't love this book. On one level, I enjoyed the story and thought it provocative, but the characters were a little flat and remote. It was worth reading, but I don't think I'd read it again as I would with many other classics.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2012

    One of the best classics out there!

    One of the best classics out there!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    Interesting, A Must Read Chief Bromden, the narrator of One Fle


    Interesting, A Must Read
    Chief Bromden, the narrator of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, is a ten-year patient of the Oregon Psychiatric hospital. He has extreme paranoia, as is evident from the start of the book. He suffers from hallucinations and delusions. He is dominated by what he refers to as the “Combine”, controlling society and forcing people into conformity. He pretends to be deaf and dumb, and tries his hardest to be left alone by the rest of the ward’s patients. The patients, all male, are divided up into two “groups”, the Acutes, who have a chance of being cured of their insanity, and the Chronics, who cannot be cured. All patients are dominated by a leading female figure, Nurse Ratched, a former army nurse. Bromden and Ratched have entertaining confrontations throughout the book. When Randle McMurphy arrives from a work farm, all other patients suspect that he merely pretended to be insane to escape the farm. Bromden immediately senses that something is different about him as he introduces himself as a heavy gambler. The book continues as Bromden recounts the events about McMurphy. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a book that shows the true meaning of laughter, the importance of expressing sexuality, and depicts women as “threatening”.
    The power of laughter is a strong theme in this book. Patients in the ward go day by day with little laughter and excitement. The ward is boring, dark, and days go by the same as always. However, when McMurphy enters the ward, patients hear real laughter for the first time. In one point in the book, Bromden recalls from his childhood, “I forget sometimes what laughter can do.” Another message in this book is the importance of openly expressing sexuality. Many of the patients in the ward have much different sexual identities because of past relationships with women. Nurse Ratched continues to have a very controlled ward, and this contrasts with her wishes. Many of the men in the ward see Nurse Ratched as overpowering and demanding, and she shapes the men’s ideas about women.
    One of the things that I didn’t like in the book One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest was the “openness” of the book. This book is an adult book, and many of the messages in the book are not appropriate for young readers. I did not like how “sexual” the book was, and that bothered me while I was reading the book. It was distracting from the true meaning of the book. I really liked and appreciated the character development in this book, and it was obvious that the author spent much time developing the characters to make them as strong and driven as possible.
    I would recommend this book to older readers, not necessarily to younger readers. This becomes obvious while reading the book. I would also recommend this book to people who enjoy complex books. Overall, I would give this book 7 out of 10 stars.

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