Customer Reviews for

One Mississippi

Average Rating 4
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(22)

4 Star

(16)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(6)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2008

    A fine novel blending comedy and tragedy - just like life

    To judge from the reviews of other readers, I would say that a lot of people just don't like chocolate with their peanut butter. Or comedy with their tragedy. It's true that this book mixes the two in sometimes unsettling ways - but isn't that what all the best books do? Keep you off guard, laughing one moment, ready to cry the next? I enjoy authors who do that -- like John Irving, Wally Lamb, Anne Tyler. And Mark Childress

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2006

    Everyone must Read this Book

    One Mississippi is a fictional story that took place over four decades ago, but still has relevance in today's time. Its a coming of age story that tugs at your heart and keeps you hook until the very end. A Great summer read on those hot summer nights. It takes you to a place where you feel good inside. As I started to read the book, finishing within a week, I was personally drawn to the trials and tribulations of the two main characters, Daniel and Tim, faced while in high school. Join then when Daniel Musgrove's father is relocated from Indiana to Minor, Miss., in 1973. In a new School, Daniel feels out of place, until he meets a kindred spirit, Tim Cousins, whose motto is 'Everything is funny all the time,' - Even until the very end. The two become the best of friends and bond over Sonny and Cher Show - they even go to a concert. The boys decided to double date on prom night and on the way home, they accidentally run over Arnita Beecham, The school's first black prom queen, the boys flee, letting Red Martin, the school bully take the fall. When Arnita wakes up from her coma, she believes that she is a white girl named Linda. Daniel fails in love with Arnita makes Tim extremely jealous and puts their year long secret at risk. The author really did his research when making cross-references to other prominent fictional characters (Gone with the Wind - Mammy and Scarlett, Ethel Merman, and Sonny and Cher) Although the book did end with the demise of Tim, my favorite character, overall it was an enjoyable read. This book kept me up at night and kept me laughing on the way to work. In the end when Tim said 'How can one person be so alone when there are three billion people on the planet? I didn't want three billion people, Just you' That's when it hit me like a ton of bricks. I started crying. I have never read anything since Memoirs of a Geisha, that has touch me as this story has. I definitely recommend that you pick up this book and step back in time to a place where innocents is lost and one best friend is all you need. Its so worth it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 26, 2013

    It took me a while to get into the story but then I couldn't sto

    It took me a while to get into the story but then I couldn't stop reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    Great

    Childress is great as always

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  • Posted January 7, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The opening paragraphs of this novel do what a good opening to a

    The opening paragraphs of this novel do what a good opening to a novel is supposed to do – draw the reader in and let them know what they are about to read without giving the story away.  In its opening scene, One Mississippi shows a group of 15-year-old boys spending an afternoon “following the mosquito truck through the streets, breathing the sweet-smelling clouds of DDT because we’d heard it would get you high.” p. 3.  The message – no matter how sweetly it may smell, poison is still deadly.  Mr. Childress spends the next 382 pages concocting a deadly brew that is often hilariously sweet and, in so doing, making the poison all more bitter.
    Just as Daniel Musgrove is about to enter his junior year of high school, his father is transferred from Indiana to Minor, Mississippi, about 10 miles from Jackson.  Already deeply troubled, the move succeeds in deepening the chasms in the family.  The book is told from the first person point-of-view of Daniel, is set in 1974 the first year of forced integration of schools, a reality that gives the outsider Daniel reason to feel all the more isolated.  The reader experiences the hilarity of Daniel’s Junior Prom (the images of his Tuxedo are worth at least two readings) and is blindsided as is Daniel when the night ends in ways that are life-changing for many in attendance at the prom.  The next six months of Daniel’s life is filled with the confusion, danger, pleasant surprises, unexpected discoveries and meanness one remembers from high school and that does nothing to alleviate the tragedy of that April night.
    I was much looking forward to reading the book.   Reading Mr. Childress previously has been a delight and his writing skills have only improved in the interim of my previous reading of this author.  The sharpness of his characters, with the vividness of his description of the story’s setting gives this book the breath of live.  His ability to magnify the teenage angst without making it cliché is a gift not given to many authors.  By the end of the book, I was grieving having to say farewell to the Musgrove family, celebrating a bit of good fortune for Daniel and vaguely depressed at what I had just “gone through” in the process of being so deeply attached to this tale.
    The book contains violence of various kinds – the most painful being the emotional abuse teenagers heap upon the weaker in their midst so aptly described.  There are moments of a sexual nature and graphic sexual language within its pages as well.  I read this book in four days of a very busy week – this was due to my taking every available moment to read it.  Even when I knew I did not want to see what was next, I could not keep from turning the next page.  What more can be said of how well this book is written.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2012

    FANTASTIC READ

    I love This book. The humor and understanding of the South make this an enjoyable time well spent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    terrible

    It started out good then it went down hill. The people where all very strange. I also do not need to read about a school shooting. Terrible book cant believe it got good reviews.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2011

    A laugh out loud read with a great twist

    Highly recommended. The musical in it will make you laugh and the teenage characters are well-developed. A great read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2011

    Mark Childress is always a must read.

    Comedy and tragedy blends for a wonderful read. I have never been disappointed by Mark Childress. He always captures the southern soul and conflict in his writing.

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  • Posted March 24, 2011

    Young love,forbidden love,discovery,teen bullying and retribution the more things change the more they stay the same .........A great read

    Surprise surpise surprise! In my Gommer Pyle voice! Nothing is ever what it expects to be.This book was more than what I thought it was goin to be. It was truely a surprising story. Although there were some dry mind numbing parts that went on a bit long,it was well worth it, once it got going. I could'nt stop talking about it. Almost 5 stars if not for the dry parts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2011

    Love it!

    This tale of growing up as an outcast is really outstanding. Comidic, dark and addicting. Within a few short pages you will be in love with these characters and wishing the world wasn't such a cruel mistress.

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  • Posted August 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Childhood memories

    Have you ever counted One Mississippi, Two Mississippi, Three Mississippi? Well, I have and this is why I picked up the book. Story was great could not put down, great summer read. Would be looking for more book by author, liked his style of writing.

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  • Posted May 9, 2009

    ...Two Mississippi, Three Mississippi, Four

    This is classic Southern fiction again by Childress. As lyrical as a nursery rhyme, the story unfolds with unexpected and tragically funny sidetrips. Right when you think you have something figured out, guess again. Don't try to second guess the routing of the trip you're about to take with Childress to a different time and place.

    The characters are easy to identify with. I don't if this makes them human, real, or just well written. I could feel some of the dialogue. Brilliant writing about an almost unbelievable tale in a place you think you know, but you really don't.

    Sit back with a cool lemonade and a fly swatter. You'll be on the porch a long time enjoying this one!

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  • Posted February 3, 2009

    A huge suprise, a must read

    One Mississippi - Mark Childress<BR/>> <BR/>> I would NEVER have picked up this book to read it on my own. It just <BR/>> isn't the kind of book I enjoy. However, once read, it is now a book <BR/>> a recommend to EVERYONE, it was so amazingly excellent. It is a MUST <BR/>> read for EVERYONE!<BR/>> <BR/>> <BR/>> <BR/>> A white Yankee is transplanted to the black south. Daniel is a high <BR/>> school junior and moving is simply a way of life for his family. The <BR/>> family of three kids and two parents do what is best for daddy and <BR/>> whatever his job dictates. Daniel and his family are not accustom to <BR/>> the prejudices of the south, being from the north, folks are folks no <BR/>> matter their color. So the culture shock is a bit uncomfortable for <BR/>> this family.<BR/>> <BR/>> Daniel's theory is "you only need one best friend to make it though <BR/>> high school" and Tim is his. The two are up to antics that will split <BR/>> your sides. Until one night, the unthinkable happen and the damage <BR/>> grown a life of it's own. Upsetting an entire town and the lives of <BR/>> all who live there. In the end Daniels dad finally does the one <BR/>> unselfish act of his life and thinks of Daniel...it's a pager turner <BR/>> from the beginning with twist and turns and antics to keep you going <BR/>> for days to follow.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2008

    Mayhem in Minor

    One Mississippi, published in 2007, by Mark Childress is a twisting story that not only engulfs the reader but makes you look into your action and consequences more deeply. A Little, Brown & Company book, One Mississippi tells the story of a high-school-aged boy and his struggle to fit into a new culture. This is a tantalizing tale that is sure to be a favorite read for anyone. Torn from his Indian home, Daniel Musgrove strives to find his place in the small Mississippi town of Minor. Daniel wishes that he could escape like his older brother who joins the military the day he turns 18. Instead, Daniel is forced to stay in Minor, mowing the never-ending lawn and hanging out with his only friend, Tim Cousins. But Daniels life quickly goes down hill when he is in the middle of supposedly vicious crime and tragedy after tragedy hits his family. He tries to find solace in his only friend until Tim suddenly starts acting strange and commits an act that the town of Minor never thought it would see. I liked Childress¿s writing style and the information that appeared about the 1960¿s. He did not jump around or do a lot of back tracking. Once I started reading, it was hard to put down. A deep, twisting tale that tells the perils of being a teen ager in the `60¿s and how one boy manages to survive it all. The book will leave an imprint in your mind. Childress¿s work will leave you stunned and begging for more. I enjoyed Childress¿s book so much that I read one of his other books, Crazy in Alabama.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 14, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Mayhem in Minor

    One Mississippi, published in 2007, by Mark Childress is a twisting story that not only engulfs the reader but makes you look into your action and consequences more deeply. A Little, Brown & Company book, One Mississippi tells the story of a high-school-aged boy and his struggle to fit into a new culture. This is a tantalizing tale that is sure to be a favorite read for anyone. <BR/><BR/> Torn from his Indian home, Daniel Musgrove strives to find his place in the small Mississippi town of Minor. Daniel wishes that he could escape like his older brother who joins the military the day he turns 18. Instead, Daniel is forced to stay in Minor, mowing the never-ending lawn and hanging out with his only friend, Tim Cousins. But Daniels life quickly goes down hill when he is in the middle of supposedly vicious crime and tragedy after tragedy hits his family. He tries to find solace in his only friend until Tim suddenly starts acting strange and commits an act that the town of Minor never thought it would see. I liked Childress¿s writing style and the information that appeared about the 1960¿s. He did not jump around or do a lot of back tracking. Once I started reading, it was hard to put down. <BR/><BR/> A deep, twisting tale that tells the perils of being a teen ager in the `60¿s and how one boy manages to survive it all. The book will leave an imprint in your mind. Childress¿s work will leave you stunned and begging for more. I enjoyed Childress¿s book so much that I read one of his other books, Crazy in Alabama.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2008

    Too unrealistic, too much confusion between comedy and tragedy

    Starts out funny with interesting characters and situations, then turns into a very dark, sad book but still with some comedy thrown in which didn't fit anymore. Too many unbelievable situations (house explosions, car explosions, etc.) which also didn't work with the book's 'Danny's just a regular kid' feel. A letdown, especially after reading 'Crazy In Alabama'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2008

    great book

    this is one of the best books ive read in awhile and now everyone at my job is reading it i let one woman read it and now its getting passed around and everone is reading it, its a great book so if your wondering about it you should get it you wont be sorry...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2007

    Hits All the Right Notes

    With a sharp eye and keen understanding of the many forces afoot in Mississippi in the early 70s, Childress has brought his considerable talents to bear in this telling of one boy's odyssey from naive acceptance to a strong sense of self. In particular, I laughed till my belly hurt when reading the chapters about a home-grown church musical production and the hero's misbegotten trip to the prom. A great read! Highly recommended!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2007

    Waste of time

    After LOVING his book, 'Crazy in Alabama' (which was so wonderfully crafted), this was very disappointing. Sucks you in at first, but by the end it's exhausting to read. Constant arguing with his friend, girlfriend, family. The ending was wrapped up too quickly and terribly cliched. An easy read with no real substance.

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