Customer Reviews for

One Mississippi

Average Rating 4
( 50 )
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5 Star

(22)

4 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 16 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    Great

    Childress is great as always

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  • Posted January 7, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The opening paragraphs of this novel do what a good opening to a

    The opening paragraphs of this novel do what a good opening to a novel is supposed to do – draw the reader in and let them know what they are about to read without giving the story away.  In its opening scene, One Mississippi shows a group of 15-year-old boys spending an afternoon “following the mosquito truck through the streets, breathing the sweet-smelling clouds of DDT because we’d heard it would get you high.” p. 3.  The message – no matter how sweetly it may smell, poison is still deadly.  Mr. Childress spends the next 382 pages concocting a deadly brew that is often hilariously sweet and, in so doing, making the poison all more bitter.
    Just as Daniel Musgrove is about to enter his junior year of high school, his father is transferred from Indiana to Minor, Mississippi, about 10 miles from Jackson.  Already deeply troubled, the move succeeds in deepening the chasms in the family.  The book is told from the first person point-of-view of Daniel, is set in 1974 the first year of forced integration of schools, a reality that gives the outsider Daniel reason to feel all the more isolated.  The reader experiences the hilarity of Daniel’s Junior Prom (the images of his Tuxedo are worth at least two readings) and is blindsided as is Daniel when the night ends in ways that are life-changing for many in attendance at the prom.  The next six months of Daniel’s life is filled with the confusion, danger, pleasant surprises, unexpected discoveries and meanness one remembers from high school and that does nothing to alleviate the tragedy of that April night.
    I was much looking forward to reading the book.   Reading Mr. Childress previously has been a delight and his writing skills have only improved in the interim of my previous reading of this author.  The sharpness of his characters, with the vividness of his description of the story’s setting gives this book the breath of live.  His ability to magnify the teenage angst without making it cliché is a gift not given to many authors.  By the end of the book, I was grieving having to say farewell to the Musgrove family, celebrating a bit of good fortune for Daniel and vaguely depressed at what I had just “gone through” in the process of being so deeply attached to this tale.
    The book contains violence of various kinds – the most painful being the emotional abuse teenagers heap upon the weaker in their midst so aptly described.  There are moments of a sexual nature and graphic sexual language within its pages as well.  I read this book in four days of a very busy week – this was due to my taking every available moment to read it.  Even when I knew I did not want to see what was next, I could not keep from turning the next page.  What more can be said of how well this book is written.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 24, 2011

    Young love,forbidden love,discovery,teen bullying and retribution the more things change the more they stay the same .........A great read

    Surprise surpise surprise! In my Gommer Pyle voice! Nothing is ever what it expects to be.This book was more than what I thought it was goin to be. It was truely a surprising story. Although there were some dry mind numbing parts that went on a bit long,it was well worth it, once it got going. I could'nt stop talking about it. Almost 5 stars if not for the dry parts.

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  • Posted August 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Childhood memories

    Have you ever counted One Mississippi, Two Mississippi, Three Mississippi? Well, I have and this is why I picked up the book. Story was great could not put down, great summer read. Would be looking for more book by author, liked his style of writing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2008

    Mayhem in Minor

    One Mississippi, published in 2007, by Mark Childress is a twisting story that not only engulfs the reader but makes you look into your action and consequences more deeply. A Little, Brown & Company book, One Mississippi tells the story of a high-school-aged boy and his struggle to fit into a new culture. This is a tantalizing tale that is sure to be a favorite read for anyone. Torn from his Indian home, Daniel Musgrove strives to find his place in the small Mississippi town of Minor. Daniel wishes that he could escape like his older brother who joins the military the day he turns 18. Instead, Daniel is forced to stay in Minor, mowing the never-ending lawn and hanging out with his only friend, Tim Cousins. But Daniels life quickly goes down hill when he is in the middle of supposedly vicious crime and tragedy after tragedy hits his family. He tries to find solace in his only friend until Tim suddenly starts acting strange and commits an act that the town of Minor never thought it would see. I liked Childress¿s writing style and the information that appeared about the 1960¿s. He did not jump around or do a lot of back tracking. Once I started reading, it was hard to put down. A deep, twisting tale that tells the perils of being a teen ager in the `60¿s and how one boy manages to survive it all. The book will leave an imprint in your mind. Childress¿s work will leave you stunned and begging for more. I enjoyed Childress¿s book so much that I read one of his other books, Crazy in Alabama.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2006

    Bottomless Pit of Troubles and Vexations

    I wasn't sure on this one. The first hundred pages or so read like a first draft. That is, certain and seemingly important details will pop up and random and are quickly explained away in a subsequent paragraph. The reason for Tim being called 'Five Spot,' comes immediately to mind. In spite of it though, or perhaps as a product of it, Mr. Childress has rendered Mississippi the most colorful state on the map. Without getting into too much of the plot, I'll suffice it to say that I was surprised by this one. Again, and again, and again. Just when I got to thinking the characters couldn't be in worse situations, or dealing with crazier people (Jacko was amazing, by the by, and Ms. Passworth rings true even to my California ears) Childress continually ups the ante. He hits a lot of hard topics, and, as I've read in some of the other reviews on this page, he's taken a bit of mud for it too. Those who seem to believe that Mr. Childress is making light of suicide and school shootings have missed the point entirely. It's wild. It's unpredictable. Yes it's tragic, but so is life. And to those same people who complained, if you hated the book so much, why did you bother to finish it?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2006

    Enjoyed this book!

    I just finished this book and found it engaging from start to finish. A great story about growing up in South in the 70's, with a little of what it must be like to be a teenager in high school these days. I would definitely recommend this book.

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    Posted June 25, 2009

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    Posted December 29, 2010

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    Posted July 21, 2009

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    Posted September 11, 2011

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    Posted August 31, 2011

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