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The One Percent Doctrine: Deep Inside America's Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

The Truth Comes Out

This book provides a good look at the thought process going into the Iraq war. It confirms many of the facts brought out in Bob Woodward's books about the Bush administration leading up to and during the Iraq war. It proves that any administration can do anything they ...
This book provides a good look at the thought process going into the Iraq war. It confirms many of the facts brought out in Bob Woodward's books about the Bush administration leading up to and during the Iraq war. It proves that any administration can do anything they want if they are not willing to entertain open dialogue and are willing to twist truths and lie if it will get them where they want to go.

posted by Dr_Mike on March 2, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

This poorly written book has the wrong title.

To say I was disappointed with this book would be an understatement. Suskind 'I'll use his last name since he doesn't respectfully use others' full names either'is obviously anti-President Bush and anti-Iraq, which is okay if that is your view. But to draw attention to ...
To say I was disappointed with this book would be an understatement. Suskind 'I'll use his last name since he doesn't respectfully use others' full names either'is obviously anti-President Bush and anti-Iraq, which is okay if that is your view. But to draw attention to your book and miraculously have it a Bestseller, then only talk about President Bush and how unjustified the Iraq war is, was very deceitful. I quite frankly wanted to throw it in the garbage after the first 100 pages, but I was waiting for it to improve. Suskind gets so far off of the supposed topics in this book, he makes reference on page 248 on how the President spends more time with Dr. Rice than he does with his wife. He also demonstrated poor investigation by talking about the Air Force Academy in Denver 'page 314'. Any person with the lowest form of military intelligence is aware the Air Force Academy is located near Colorado Springs, about 75 miles south of Denver. If you want accurate, unbiased information, do not waste your time or money with this 'book.'

posted by Anonymous on July 16, 2007

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  • Posted March 2, 2009

    The Truth Comes Out

    This book provides a good look at the thought process going into the Iraq war. It confirms many of the facts brought out in Bob Woodward's books about the Bush administration leading up to and during the Iraq war. It proves that any administration can do anything they want if they are not willing to entertain open dialogue and are willing to twist truths and lie if it will get them where they want to go.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2007

    This poorly written book has the wrong title.

    To say I was disappointed with this book would be an understatement. Suskind 'I'll use his last name since he doesn't respectfully use others' full names either'is obviously anti-President Bush and anti-Iraq, which is okay if that is your view. But to draw attention to your book and miraculously have it a Bestseller, then only talk about President Bush and how unjustified the Iraq war is, was very deceitful. I quite frankly wanted to throw it in the garbage after the first 100 pages, but I was waiting for it to improve. Suskind gets so far off of the supposed topics in this book, he makes reference on page 248 on how the President spends more time with Dr. Rice than he does with his wife. He also demonstrated poor investigation by talking about the Air Force Academy in Denver 'page 314'. Any person with the lowest form of military intelligence is aware the Air Force Academy is located near Colorado Springs, about 75 miles south of Denver. If you want accurate, unbiased information, do not waste your time or money with this 'book.'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2006

    Don't Let The Title Fool You

    I bought this book after thoroughly enjoying an excerpt of it found in TIME magazine. I was under the impression that this book would be dealing with the hunt for terrorists however, that could be no furthur from the truth. I stopped reading this book 50 pages in. This is a blatant attack on the Bush Administration with such a bias that the truth can not be completely conveyed. It seems very often that Suskind's sources for his various attacks come from individuals who have had a falling out with Bush, Cheyney, or Rumsfeld. Two sides to an argument are never presented and conflicting rationale is found in many spots.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2006

    Compelling Rationale for the 1% Solution: Keep America in Fear

    As in his previous book, 'The Price of Loyalty', Suskind surgically locates the tumor that has taken hold of American foreign policy. How can simplicity have become the driving force behind US foreign policymaking? That complex, impactful and highly respected process used to be the preserve of reasoned, fact-based, human-rights oriented statesmanship, admired by our Allies, respected by our adversaries... No longer! The 'one percent solution' says it all.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2008

    The Notables and The Invisibles

    A very revealing and rational discourse about the 'war on terror' is described in Ron Suskind's well-detailed, meticulous effort on the largely secret battle between secret operatives of the CIA, FBI, and other bueracratic entities that go unnoticed: hence, the term 'invisibles' There are long and detailed descriptions of the notables, of course, involved in the early days of Global War on Terror, namely Tenet, Rumsfeld, Rice, Bush, and the nefarious Cheney. What is incredible about this book is that while it degrades the personal leadership of Bush and Cheney and their entire administration, it demonstrates a certain sympathy for the CIA and the invisible men and women fighting in this shadowy world who can't decipher friend from foe. Qaddafi, Musharraf, Crown Prince Abdullah, and the ever clever Prince Bandar of Saudi Arabia makes frequent appearances in pursuit of a wraith-like enemy. The question for the invisible men and women of the CIA: do these notables of the Middle East have true intentions of helping us or deceiving us? Those questions may never be answered. Partial insights about the Bush Administration's thinking into Iraq is also explained, although, more from this great reporter could be desirous. Finally, in the book, for every evil member of al-Qaeda or one of its partner organizations caught, there are another ten heads that pop up, like the Greek god Hydra. How long will this largely undefined and chillingly dangerous war last? The answer is to be seen.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2007

    Useful study of the 'war on terror'

    Ron Suskind is an experienced American writer who used to be the Wall Street Journal¿s senior national affairs reporter. He has written a very informative account of the US state¿s `war on terror¿. He describes ¿the Cheney Doctrine ¿ where a one percent chance of catastrophe must be treated `as a certainty¿, where firm evidence, of either intent or capability, is too high a threshold where the doctrine is, in essence, prevention based on suspicion.¿ He writes, ¿fear and faith fused in a fact-starved environment.¿ Richard Clarke, Bush¿s counter-terrorism chief, described how Bush ignored the Al Qa¿ida threat before 9/11, even though Al Qa¿ida had killed more Americans than any other adversary in the eight Clinton years. After 9/11, the US aim should have been to decapitate Al Qa¿ida in its Afghan refuge, then withdraw. Yet when US forces cornered Osama bin Laden and his 800 closest followers in the Tora Bora caves, Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld rejected the CIA¿s urgent advice to surround Tora Bora. Instead, they let all 800 escape to Pakistan. Why? Incompetence? Or because if they¿d got bin Laden, the overt rationale for their worldwide oil wars would have gone? Suskind shows that the US government knew in early 2005 that Mohammed Siddique Khan, a British citizen, was planning violence in the USA. The FBI warned, ¿this is a very dangerous character. We and the Brits should be all over this guy.¿ The US government put him on their `no-fly¿ list. US officials told British officials all they knew about Khan¿s plans and why they had banned him from flying to the USA. When he arrived at Heathrow in February 2005 to fly to the USA, he was told that he was not allowed to fly, which of course warned him that he was under suspicion. But what happened next? Did MI5 act on the FBI warning? No, they did nothing. Khan¿s name and telephone number had also emerged in the investigation into an earlier plot to bomb London, but MI5 failed to follow up this lead as well. They ignored the FBI¿s warning and failed to put Khan under surveillance. Now aware that he was under suspicion, he kept a very low profile until on 7/7 he led three other murderers into killing 52 Londoners. After the bombings, the Blair government at once lied that the bombings `came out of the blue¿ and that `Everything that could have been done had been done¿. Suskind points out that, as a result of the US-British attack on Iraq, terrorist recruitment is rising across the world. ¿There was, finally, a connection between Iraq and the broader `war on terror¿. It was a catalytic relationship, like gasoline on a fire.¿ In sum, the US state¿s actions ¿give true comfort to our enemies, graced with more recruitment tools than they could have hoped for.¿ Four days before the US election in October 2004, bin Laden made a broadcast which the CIA assessed as `clearly designed to assist the President¿s re-election¿. What does this say about Bush¿s leadership? The British state¿s actions also give comfort to our enemies, witness its failure to keep tabs on Mohammed Siddique Khan. And why does the British state let Saudi Arabia fund madrassas here to recruit yet more jihadist murderers? Suskind rightly says that we should fight the terrorists with justice and morality, but basic competence would be good too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2007

    The best analysis of the Bush administration I have read.

    For the past couple of years I have spent some time trying to get a peek inside the secretive Bush White house through several popular authors' works on the subject. Ron Suskind's One Percent Doctrine is by far the best, essential work on the topic. Suskind is a facile author who brings you into the processes and meetings with the few inside players who apparently decide what George is going to see and therefore think about pre-ordained policies. The best of the best- a master work that deserves to be a college textbook.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2007

    Why take a chance?

    With super-empowered individuals, not just nations possibly getting nukes and other really bad stuff, America has to act, not react to threats. That's the change in US doctrine presented by this book. The author outlines this new strategy in light of 9/11 and on-going threats and how the the US government changed in recent years.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2006

    The Book That The Administration Doesn't Want You To Read

    I am a Texas resident and have been a straight ticket Republican my entire life. However the rationale of invading Iraq never set right with me. I gave Bush the benefit of the doubt but have been increasingly disappointed as the country has drifted towards Viet Nam Part II. This book was outstanding. I have never been so embarrased at having voted for a politician TWICE as I was after reading this book. We have been so manipulated! The Bush administration has played fast and loose with the truth and deflected responsibility for not only the 9/11 attacks but the inability to find WMD's in Iraq. We have lost personal liberties and have been deluded into believing that we are actually safer now than we were before 9/11. Suskind has done an unbelievable job of documenting all of the above while demonstrating why so many capable officials have left the administration while incompetents like Rumsfeld have stayed on. I look forward to the next book by this outstanding author.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2006

    What a disappointment!

    Although it starts out interestingly on a subject of great import to all Americans, it devolves quickly into a poorly written diatribe. I was initially hooked by reading about real people dealinbg with the afermath of 9/11 in what otherwise seemed like a spy novel. By the time it's done, it turns out to be nothing more than another anti-Bush tome. And someone, please, take Mr. Suskind's, commas, away from him. The run-on sentences are not just confusing, but painful to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2006

    Party-Line War Propaganda

    The book misses the whole point - that it's not a war on terror, but a war of terror. The word terrorism was first invented to describe state terror, and the central fact of it is still state policy working through covert means. Terrorists have been fostered for the purpose of a war pretext. No nation has ever been mad enough to really want to fight the US (except Britain). Now the US war party have run out of ruses to draw nations into wars they can only win, they invent the shadowy 'terrorist menace.' Why were Atta and company trained at US Army bases? Why are the Bush and Bin Laden families buddies? This book won't give you a hint about that. It¿s all war propaganda, the instrument of imperial expansion. But living the lie may bankrupt the USA, and authors like this are opportunists making a quick buck before the ship goes down. They are not doing any of us the service of getting real information out, despite the claim to go ¿deep inside.¿

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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