Customer Reviews for

Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Nazi Germany is always a fascinating topic. This book brilliantl

    Nazi Germany is always a fascinating topic. This book brilliantly details the U.S. government’s mission to acquire Nazi scientists after WWII. It is well researched and very had to put down. High marks!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    A thought provoking, mind-blowing page turner that will make you

    A thought provoking, mind-blowing page turner that will make you re-consider everything you thought you knew about America's technological advancements during the Cold War.
    Did America recruit NAZI war criminals to help build the Cold War era Defense, Intelligence and Space Military Industrial Complex. Yes, indeed.
    Did America's scientific, intelligence and military establishment fall into a moral quagmire in its efforts to hide this truth from the public. Probably.
    Worse yet was the subtle way in which the NAZI's Machiavellian approach to experiments on human subjects was put into practice by American researchers in our effort to stay ahead of the Soviet Union.
    But the book also does a great job of capturing the human interest side of the story whether of NAZI scientists, their families, their surviving victims, and the flawed American military and scientific leaders responsible for their fate. 
    I recommend this book to all those with an interest in WWII/Cold War History, NBC operations, intelligence operations, the space program, conspiracy and investigative journalism.
    Operation Paperclip will certainly become the standard reference work on this subject.
    This is the third and by far best book by investigative journalist Annie Jacobsen. 
    But I also enjoyed and recommend her previous books, Terror in the Skies (especially given the mystery of Malaysian Airlines flight 370) and Area 51.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2014

    No text was provided for this review

    No text was provided for this review

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2014

    Highly recommended

    I thought the book was well written, informative, objective in reporting and a story that every American should know.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 18, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent

    Great Reading: Fascinating story of Nazi Scientists and their evil and good contributions to society. raises a lot of moral questions as to the US using them.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2014

    This was a fascinating read. For anyone with an interest in scie

    This was a fascinating read. For anyone with an interest in science, history, or WWII, this one is for you. Jacobsen has managed to dig up Operation Paperclip and present it to us in a can't-put-down way. I would have given five stars, but I occasionally felt as though the narrative wandered. Really enjoyed this.

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  • Posted April 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    What no reviewer seems to have pointed out is the apparent super

    What no reviewer seems to have pointed out is the apparent superiority of German universities such as those at Goettingen and Tuebingen, whose scientific graduates, while no more intelligent than their U.S. or British counterparts, were light-years ahead in military applications of physics and chemistry. No other country's scientists were capable of producing the V-2 rockets or -- Sputnik's German creators not excepted -- satellites. German exchange students in our high schools regularly report that they aren't being taught anything that they haven't already learned. John J. McCloy's view that it was preferable to employ even virulently anti-Semitic Nazi scientists in our military-industrial complex rather than allow the Soviets to reap the advantages of their contributions is arguably cogent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2014

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