Customer Reviews for

The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession

Average Rating 3.5
( 19 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Sprawling New Yorker Stuff

As screenwriter Charlie Kaufman in the movie Adaptation, Nicolas Cage is frustrated with the assignment of adapting The Orchid Thief into a screenplay. 'It's that sprawling New Yorker 'stuff'' Cage complains, yet he admires the book for its beauty and longing and truth...
As screenwriter Charlie Kaufman in the movie Adaptation, Nicolas Cage is frustrated with the assignment of adapting The Orchid Thief into a screenplay. 'It's that sprawling New Yorker 'stuff'' Cage complains, yet he admires the book for its beauty and longing and truthfulness. Well, Cage/Kaufman was right on all accounts. The Orchid Thief 'not accurately represented in the movie, in case you were wondering' is sprawling, and beautiful. Orlean wrote herself into the story of John Laroche, who was caught stealing orchids and other rare plants out of Florida's Fakahatchee State Preserve, and Kaufman follows suit by writing himself into the movie. Orlean took a very minor event and investigated it as thoroughly as possible, taking several detours throughout the book to further examine the history of orchid obsession, shady Florida land deals, and the Seminole Indian tribe as well as various infamous historical figures of same. Orlean's writing style is that of a chatty but extremely well-informed friend. Run-on sentences and extremely long paragraphs -- I saw more than a few that were over a page long -- are the order of the day, thick with historical research and a wacky cast of characters that rivals anything set to print by Elmore Leonard or Carl Hiaasen. Orlean's rambling style and frequent diversions from course were distracting to me, but it was marvelous how she kept it interesting and pulled everything together with the theme of what we do in the name of passion. Like Dan Brown's celebrated efforts on Christian History, I never knew orchids could be so interesting.

posted by Anonymous on December 19, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

A fascinating look into the world of orchid lovers

I really didn't realize that this book was non fiction. I was just going by the scenes I had seen from the movie and assumed it was fiction. To the folks that are not into orchidelirium, the people that are probably are stranger than fiction. Since I have a small orc...
I really didn't realize that this book was non fiction. I was just going by the scenes I had seen from the movie and assumed it was fiction. To the folks that are not into orchidelirium, the people that are probably are stranger than fiction. Since I have a small orchid collection but refuse to pay more than $50 for one, this world of obsession where a collector will pay thousands of dollars for a rare speciman, is even beyond my comprehension. The book is based on the authors reading an article in a Florida newspaper about a case of 4 people trying to steal ghost orchids off of Seminole reservation property. Why? Because a man named Larouche wants to clone them and make millions of dollars while at the same time show the US Park Service that they need to take better care of the orchids. Keep them safe from poachers like him. Some times this reminded me of Carl Hiaasen's writing of the quirky characters of south Florida. Murder, mayhem, theft, adultry, threats, and strange animals and reptiles all smuggles in via underwear. So, we get quite a bit of Seminole history, history of Florida, history of the settling of Florida and at times, that becomes tedious. But as an orchid lover who will drive several hours to an orchid show or wholesaler, I thoroughly enjoyed understanding more about the world of orchids and the uniqueness of its world (both plant and human).

posted by Madame-Bella-Bleuski on June 2, 2009

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  • Posted June 2, 2009

    A fascinating look into the world of orchid lovers

    I really didn't realize that this book was non fiction. I was just going by the scenes I had seen from the movie and assumed it was fiction. To the folks that are not into orchidelirium, the people that are probably are stranger than fiction. Since I have a small orchid collection but refuse to pay more than $50 for one, this world of obsession where a collector will pay thousands of dollars for a rare speciman, is even beyond my comprehension. The book is based on the authors reading an article in a Florida newspaper about a case of 4 people trying to steal ghost orchids off of Seminole reservation property. Why? Because a man named Larouche wants to clone them and make millions of dollars while at the same time show the US Park Service that they need to take better care of the orchids. Keep them safe from poachers like him. Some times this reminded me of Carl Hiaasen's writing of the quirky characters of south Florida. Murder, mayhem, theft, adultry, threats, and strange animals and reptiles all smuggles in via underwear. So, we get quite a bit of Seminole history, history of Florida, history of the settling of Florida and at times, that becomes tedious. But as an orchid lover who will drive several hours to an orchid show or wholesaler, I thoroughly enjoyed understanding more about the world of orchids and the uniqueness of its world (both plant and human).

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2014

    I had high hopes for this book but ended up skimming the last ha

    I had high hopes for this book but ended up skimming the last half.  The information about orchids is fascinating as are the descriptions of the Florida swamps and the people who are in the orchid game.  However, the book reads more like an extended article in the New Yorker.  I'm not sorry I read/skimmed it,.  It's a solid C+.

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