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Origin of Brands: Discover the Natural Laws of Product Innovation and Business Survival

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2004

    Packed with Intelligent Marketing and PR Advice

    What do WebTV, The Swiss Army Knife, and Miller Lite all have in common? If you said bad ideas, you¿re only half right. According to the new book ¿The Origin of Brands¿ from marketing experts Al & Laura Ries (The Fall of Advertising & The Rise of PR), they are also examples of convergence, which should be avoided whenever possible...................... Convergence occurs when products produced separately are merged into one. The authors of this book offer an alternative, divergence or new products or services that stand alone. Relying heavily on examples from Darwin¿s ¿Origin of Species¿ the authors explain why creating separate categories are more beneficial to consumers, businesses, and the marketplace. The authors state ¿Did you ever see a tree in which two branches converged to form a single branch? Perhaps, but this is highly unlikely in nature. It¿s also highly unlikely in products and services.¿ Instead, according to this book, divergence is the answer............................. In the chapter titled ¿Survival of The Firstest,¿ the authors give the best advice. They insist on the importance of launching a brand into a naught market, relying on the importance of being first. And if you can¿t be first in the market, the chapter ¿Survival of the Secondest,¿ explains how to survive being second and how to overcome the competition. The authors explain how emulation is to be avoided and being the direct opposite of competitor¿s works best. They use The University of Phoenix, G.I. Joe, and Bud Light as successful examples............................ Though this book tends to overlook some of the successes in convergence, like the car stereo and the caller ID/phone, ¿The Origin of Brands¿ is still an excellent book. It¿s packed with intelligent marketing and public relations advice that could be applied to practically every product, business, or service. Anyone in business will love this book and will not be able to put it down until the very last page. ¿The Origin of Brands¿ will make a wonderful desk reference for anyone who wants to practice sound marketing techniques. Buy it. Study it. And put in into action.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2009

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