Customer Reviews for

Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance (Oscar Wilde Mystery Series #1)

Average Rating 4
( 15 )
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5 Star

(6)

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3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

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  • Posted January 15, 2012

    What a pleasant surprise

    This book was recommended to me as a "must read" by a close friend. She was absolutely correct.

    The story is fun and engaging, and (if I understand correctly) is based on true events. Brandreth has a wonderful command of the English language. I found myself busily, and happy engaged researching the definition of period-based and new words that I'd not seen before.

    Very, very, nice.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2009

    Wilde Times in London

    As a fan of Oscar Wilde, I was excited when I came across this title. Gyles Brandeth has created a new role for Wilde as an amateur sleuth, attempting to solve the murder of a young friend after the police fail to take an interest in the case. Along the way, Wilde is occasionally assisted by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the character Sherlock Holmes.

    Brandeth does a good job working many of Wilde's most memorable quotes into the storyline, and the teaming of Wilde and Doyle is an intriguing one. So long as the reader bears in mind that this is a work of fiction and not fact, this is a fun read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 16, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    It resulted it was not a Death of NO Importance

    I read Oscar Wilde and a Death of no imprtancefor my summer reading, and I came across it, by another book that recomneded it "The Daughter of Time" The boook juts kept me rading, and yeah although some parts disgusted me, just the thought of thinking into, though it was realluy a goood, book I love Mysterya nad history is one of my favorite subjects. the plot was intriguing, as was my suprise to how the murderer was, and reasons behind it. Im hoping to continue reading the series of Gyles Brandeth

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Gyles Brandreth is a wonderful storyteller

    In 1889 literary phenomena Oscar Wilde rushes to 23 Crowley St. in London to keep an appointment and is let into the home by an anonymous woman. Upstairs he finds the beautiful male prostitute Billy Wood lying naked on a Persian carpet surrounded by candles, his throat cut from ear to ear. The next day he tells Arthur Conan Doyle about it when they return to the scene of the crime, they find place void of blood except for a few drops on the wall and no body.---------------------- Doyle refers him to Scotland Yard Inspector Aidan Fraser who doesn¿t seem to have much interest in the case as there is no body or evidence. A package arrives at Oscar¿s home containing Billy¿s severed head. He believes Fraser will be interested in the case now but to make sure justice is done, the author conducts his own investigation and finds a plethora of suspect ranging from Billy¿s jealous step-father to a jealous lover. Oscar is determined to find out who the killer is.----------------- Gyles Brandreth is a wonderful storyteller who creates a clever mystery while also providing a glimpse into literary late Victorian England. Oscar Wilde makes a great Sherlock Holmes and his sexual proclivities are implied for instance the club he belongs to is filled with sodomite members. This tale is told in the first person by Wilde¿s good and logical friend another writer Robert Sherard adding to the sense of a literary journey into the late nineteen century.--------- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2008

    Not as good as the origininal

    While a decent story is told, if you are a fan of Sherlock Holmes disappointment is inevitable. Brandreth spends a large majority of the book giving praise to Oscar Wilde and Billy Wood, the boy whom the story revolves around, and devotes little space to the solving of the crime. In short, Brandreth tries to be Doyle, Wilde tries to be Holmes, and Sherard tries to be Watson, but none are quite successful.

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    Posted January 6, 2012

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