Customer Reviews for

The Pacific

Average Rating 4
( 284 )
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(116)

4 Star

(78)

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2 Star

(17)

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(21)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

17 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

Hugh Ambrose has produced a book worthy of his father's legacy

I received an early release of Hugh Ambrose' "The Pacific," which is an intriguing addition to the literature of the Pacific Theater in World War II. Human elements added to the battle narrative personalize the war, and Hugh Ambrose brings out aspects to the war's fam...
I received an early release of Hugh Ambrose' "The Pacific," which is an intriguing addition to the literature of the Pacific Theater in World War II. Human elements added to the battle narrative personalize the war, and Hugh Ambrose brings out aspects to the war's familiar history that I either had forgotten or learned for the first time.

I think this is Hugh Ambrose' first work on his own, and I was suspect that he might be trading too much on his father's legacy--somewhat as the younger Shaara (whose works are good, but not truly great)--or too commercialized alongside the forthcoming HBO series. However, Hugh Ambrose has produced a book worthy of his father's legacy. It's a solid narrative, which seems consistent with Steven Ambrose' "Band of Brothers," "Citizen Soldiers," "D-Day," and "The Wild Blue" -- perhaps to be expected as Hugh Ambrose was a close collaborator on his father's projects.

The book purports to go beyond the forthcoming HBO series of the same title, which I expect will also be outstanding. It's just too bad that so many of the Marines who served in the Pacific Theater won't be able to experience this tribute, having already slipped from this world to join their friends lost 70 years ago.

If you enjoy history with strong narratives, such as the works of Steven Ambrose, Shelby Foote, David Hackett Fischer, or David McCullough; you are sure to find this book irresistible.

posted by Fabriano on February 28, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

The Pacific theater of WWII is a topic far larger than the somehwhat misnamed book by Hugh Ambrose. Ambrose's book, however, is an excellent summary of the violence which distinguished service in that theater from Europe.

Readers seeking an exciting narrative will find (as in Band of Brothers, to which it has been compared)an engaging summary of the personal experiences of its characters. However, unlike BoB which had the structural assistance of a story told about protagonists and even...
Readers seeking an exciting narrative will find (as in Band of Brothers, to which it has been compared)an engaging summary of the personal experiences of its characters. However, unlike BoB which had the structural assistance of a story told about protagonists and events within a single group of men interacting over an extended period of time, those written about here served in different branches of the services, in different units within the branches, and were involved in different battles during different years of the war. Most did not know one another or share the same events.

Standing alone, the individual narratives do provide some fascinating insights not widely written about elsewhere. Two examples from many: (1)the differences in performance of the various naval dive bomber aircraft placed in the context of life and death of their crews, and (2)the weather and logistics challenges which were often determinant in whether or not the initial US assaults on Japanese held islands were successful.

Given this structure, it is perhaps inevitable that even clever fitting-together does not prevent occasional fragmentation and a lack of continuity of time, place and the characters. Readers with a solid understanding of the historic events will have less trouble understanding the big picture within which the individual stories take place.

posted by HISTORIANJV on April 10, 2010

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  • Posted February 28, 2010

    Hugh Ambrose has produced a book worthy of his father's legacy

    I received an early release of Hugh Ambrose' "The Pacific," which is an intriguing addition to the literature of the Pacific Theater in World War II. Human elements added to the battle narrative personalize the war, and Hugh Ambrose brings out aspects to the war's familiar history that I either had forgotten or learned for the first time.

    I think this is Hugh Ambrose' first work on his own, and I was suspect that he might be trading too much on his father's legacy--somewhat as the younger Shaara (whose works are good, but not truly great)--or too commercialized alongside the forthcoming HBO series. However, Hugh Ambrose has produced a book worthy of his father's legacy. It's a solid narrative, which seems consistent with Steven Ambrose' "Band of Brothers," "Citizen Soldiers," "D-Day," and "The Wild Blue" -- perhaps to be expected as Hugh Ambrose was a close collaborator on his father's projects.

    The book purports to go beyond the forthcoming HBO series of the same title, which I expect will also be outstanding. It's just too bad that so many of the Marines who served in the Pacific Theater won't be able to experience this tribute, having already slipped from this world to join their friends lost 70 years ago.

    If you enjoy history with strong narratives, such as the works of Steven Ambrose, Shelby Foote, David Hackett Fischer, or David McCullough; you are sure to find this book irresistible.

    17 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2010

    The Pacific theater of WWII is a topic far larger than the somehwhat misnamed book by Hugh Ambrose. Ambrose's book, however, is an excellent summary of the violence which distinguished service in that theater from Europe.

    Readers seeking an exciting narrative will find (as in Band of Brothers, to which it has been compared)an engaging summary of the personal experiences of its characters. However, unlike BoB which had the structural assistance of a story told about protagonists and events within a single group of men interacting over an extended period of time, those written about here served in different branches of the services, in different units within the branches, and were involved in different battles during different years of the war. Most did not know one another or share the same events.

    Standing alone, the individual narratives do provide some fascinating insights not widely written about elsewhere. Two examples from many: (1)the differences in performance of the various naval dive bomber aircraft placed in the context of life and death of their crews, and (2)the weather and logistics challenges which were often determinant in whether or not the initial US assaults on Japanese held islands were successful.

    Given this structure, it is perhaps inevitable that even clever fitting-together does not prevent occasional fragmentation and a lack of continuity of time, place and the characters. Readers with a solid understanding of the historic events will have less trouble understanding the big picture within which the individual stories take place.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    The Pacific by Hugh Ambrose

    The book The Pacific was recomended to me by the wonderful people at Barns And Noble. On the basis that I am interested in World War II topics and have injoyed the Band of Brothers book and show. In my oppinion it was very readable even for me because i hardly ever read books and I am not the best of readers but it was well wrighten and very understandable.
    The style is historical with a little bits of facts mixed in. A good compareson would be Band of Brothers or Fly Boys. The book is about 5 different guys in different parts of the military and there adventures in the pacific front. I would highly recomend this book to any one that wants to learn about the pacific front on a first hand basis and like to learn about World War II.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2012

    I would wage war for this book.

    Expertly done, vivid, and personel to the characters. Reminding us of the greatest sacrifice you can give to your country, and the patriots who fought. A must read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2010

    Poorly Written

    Reads like a High School Term Paper

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Understanding the war inthe Pacific

    I really liked the way the book was written like fiction and told their stories, but stayed with historical facts.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 29, 2010

    Absolutely Outstanding

    This book was written for anyone to understand. It surely gave me a feeling for the turmoil that the soldiers went through. It appears that the soldiers did the work and killing and the brass took the credit for what they did.

    I find what the Japanese did to the American POWs appauling. It gave me a different understanding of what was happening.

    Thank you Hugh Ambrose for your excellent job!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    Great stor

    djkdkfj

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 4, 2012

    WW II - leaves nothing to the imagination

    Being an avid WW II reader I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book about the 3 greatest U.S. Marine island invasions. The book lets you live it all in the safety of your living room.

    If you are a big fan of WW II books you must read this one. It won't let you down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2012

    Awesome

    I love world war two books and I highly reconmend it.


    Usa rules!



    Japan sucks like crap.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2011

    To the bottom

    At the one star all the way at the bottom you are not an american for saying that. Millions of men and women died because of the war, the japanese attacked us beccause we supported the allies. The book tells a sad but amazing story of how we beat the axis and became the most powerful nation and military force on this planet.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2010

    This book was a gift from my wife.

    I have not finish the book but so far it has been excellent. I am an avid reader of World War II books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 13, 2010

    The Pacific

    The author captures many essenses of Infantry combat: the smell of death, sitting in a flooded foxhold and sharing a ration spoon with a buddy.

    The book is a thoughtful blending of historic happenings in World War II and the inner feelings of the individual Marines that lived through them.

    Through the thoughts and conversations of the principal characters, the reader is reminded of many controversal events of the times (General MacArther's pre-war planning, the write-off of the troops of Bataan and the design faults of Navy carrier aircraft) without the hindsight and softning of 65 years.

    Particularly poignantis the recounting of the battle for Pelilu, with the loss of so many Marines to capture an airfield that was no longer needed.
    The incident also demonstrates the unfortunate inflexibility of some senior military leaders to deviate from a plan once the plan is initiated.

    The book gives due honor to the Marines of the "Greatest Generation" and demonstrates that they are the finest Amphibious forces in the world.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2010

    Would recommend the book.

    The book kept me intrigued and waiting for the next event. The book details the lives and events of each of the characters and there is a lot of detail in the book. The Movie on HBO is closely following the book as well. Would recommend the book to anyone who enjoyed Band of Brothers. Lots of detail in the book, my wife read it as well and is watching the series with me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 12, 2010

    SEMPER FI

    BEING A RETIRED U.S. MARINE, WHO MISSED WORLD WAR ii BY A FEW YEARS, I ENJOYED THIS BOOK VERY MUCH AND HOW IT POINTED OUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE WAR IN EUROPE, WHICH WAS MUCH MORE HUMANE AND THE WAR IN THE PACIFIC. THE JAPANESE ARMY DID NOT CARE HOW MANY OF THEIR SOLDIERS DIED, AS ALONG AS THEY COULD KILL AS MANY MARINES AS POSSIBLE. I HOPE THE HBO SERIES IS A GOOD AS THE BOOK.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2010

    A good read but

    All in all a good read, but like the ground war in the Pacific in WWII, it grinds on through the island battles providing little differentiation from one battle to another. The book also omits major elements of the war in the Pacific, including the crucial role played by the Navy's submarine service; and loses focus on major elements when key characters are rotated out of the Pacific theater.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2013

    While the stories are riveting, I found the actual writing to be

    While the stories are riveting, I found the actual writing to be very poor.  All the errors, which one reviewer labeled as a bad high school
    term paper, made an excellent topic a riddled mess.  I want to be more positive, but the prose was so bad,that at times I was temped 
    to throw the book.  Where was the editor??  Here is a sample (bottom of page 144)
    "After ten days at Cactus, he felt the weight of the struggle and realized innately to conserve energy." 
    And another one just paging through the book: (page 182-3) "To hear that his family were all well, in a letter post marked in June of 1942 was to know joy"    What a shame that such a potentially good book is ruined by such poor writing.!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    Pokemon nerd twelve o clock

    Pretty gruesome

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    tv rubbish

    tv rubbish

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2012

    All Pokemon 3

    41. Golbat- the large mouth bat Pokemon. Searching for prey at night, Golbat seeks out the blood of both humans and Pokemon. 42. Goldeen- the goldfish Pokemon. Goldeen is imbued with the majesty of a queen, and is a champion swimmer that reaches five knots. It relies on the sharp horn on its head for protection. You can see them in many ponds. 43. Golduck- the strong duck Pokemon. Known as the fastest swimmer, this Pokemon lives in lakes. It is faster than any recorded human swimmer. 44. Gorebyss- the south sea Pokemon. Although another deep sea dweller, the body of Gorebyss will turn a brighter shade of pink during the springtime. 45. Granbull- the bull dog Pokemon. Using its huge fangs to strike at its foe, Granbull may seem imposing, but most are known to be timid. It is a popular pet among woman. 46. Growlithe- the puppy Pokemon. An extremely obedient Pokemon, Growlithe will wait patiently for orders by its trainer. It is a good family pet. 47. Grumpig- the manipulate Pokemon. Grumpig likes to dance and increases its strength by using the black pearls around its neck. They are sometimes raised on farms for pork. 48. Heracross- the single horn Pokemon. It may be tiny, but because of the tremendous strength in its legs and claws, Heracross is strong enough to pick up and throw its foes great distances. 49. Hippowdon- the heavyweight hippo Pokemon. Hippowdon does not like getting wet, so it covers itself in a layer of sand. Living in the desert, they can crush cars in their jaws. 50. Hoothoot- the baby owl Pokemon. Even though it has two feet, Hoothoot will only stand on one foot at a time while fighting. It stays with its parents until it becomes a Noctowl. 51. Horsea- the dragon Pokemon. When it senses danger, Horsea will spit out thick ink and usually rests in the shade of coral reefs. 52. Houndour- the dark Pokemon. Houndour are Pokemon that travel in a pack. They can convey their feelings through the different pitches of their cries. 53. Huntail- the deep sea Pokemon. Huntail will use its fish shaped tail to lure in its prey from the deepest parts of the seas in which it lives. 54. Illumise- the firefly Pokemon. Tiny Illumise can guide Volbeat to draw signs with light in the night sky by using its sweet aroma. 55. Infernape- the flame Pokemon. Infernape's fire never goes out, and it evolves from Chimchar. It uses many forms of martial arts to fight. 56. Kabuto- the shellfish Pokemon. Protected by a stiff shell, Kabuto has been around for three hundred million years. The meat is very tasty. 57. Kakuna- the cocoon Pokemon. Kakuna is a master of camoflage, hiding in leaves and tree branches as it waits to become a Beedrill. 58. Kecleon- the color swap Pokemon. The pattern on Kecleon's body will never change, but it can change the color of the rest of his body. They live in the jungle, sticking to leaves. 59. Kingdra- the water king Pokemon. Whenever Kingdra moves while on the seafloor, they kick up miniture sand storms. They blend in among the coral with their wings and antenae. 60. Kingler- the big pincer Pokemon. Kingler's big pincer is so heavy that it is hard to aim, but it is extremely strong. Its meat is even tastier than Krabby's.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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