Customer Reviews for

The Palace of Strange Girls

Average Rating 3.5
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  • Posted October 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Nice debut novel set in 1959

    The Palace of Strange Girls is Sallie Day's debut novel. Day grew up in England and her father ran a cotton mill, so it stands to reason why the father in this book also works in a cotton mill. Strange Girls revolves around the Singleton family on their holiday in July 1959. By all outward appearances they are your typical family living in the recession of the late 50's. Ruth, mom and wife, runs her house the way all housewives should: with a dust mop and financially iron fist. Husband/father Jack is dependable and hardworking. Teenage daughter Helen obeys her parents every command, and youngest daughter Beth tries to be normal with her abnormal childhood. Ruth tries her best to make her family as status quo and typical as possible, but there are secrets underneath the pretty polka-dot facade, and she can't keep them hidden if she doesn't know what they are.

    It took me a while to be attracted to Strange Girls. The beginning felt sluggish and unformed. By the middle I was used to the flashbacks which help paint the hidden secrets behind the Singleton family, and I was able to start really enjoying the story. The characters were interesting and individual; I enjoyed the tense atmostphere surrounding Ruth, and the pity I felt for Beth who is just trying to be a fun little girl with her I-Spy book. The voice has a nice shift to it depending on which character you're reading about. Each chapter title is an I-Spy item with description, which is both adorable and lighthearted, but turns appropriately serious for the later conflict.

    I liked the Singleton family and their flaws and the people that surround. I could clearly visualize Blackpool and the boardwalk and smell the ocean salt. I thought it was a nice, easygoing story, though the end felt incomplete, and the epilogue served as a convenient wrap-up for a few loose strings. I enjoyed the tension between the characters, but felt that it wasn't fully utilized in the beginning. The flashbacks were good, but also felt like another story that could have been written separate from Strange Girls,one that I probably would have liked better. Overall, I enjoyed Sallie Day's debut novel and can really see her potential, but it felt like someone who hadn't been writing for that long. I have a feeling her next work will be more polished and I look forward to seeing what she does. 3 stars.

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  • Posted October 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A GOOD READ

    THE PALACE OF STRANGE GIRLS
    Sallie Day
    Grand Central Publishing
    ISBN: 978-0446-54586-0
    $13.99 - Paperback
    352 pages
    Reviewer: Annie Slessman

    THE PALACE OF STRANGE GIRLS is Sallie Day's debut novel. Set in post WWII the late fifties establishes the background of this story of British families, the division of their station in life and how each reacts to the secrets they hold.

    The Singleton family consists of father, Jack, his wife, Ruth and their two daughters, Helen and Beth, sixteen and seven respectively. On a holiday at the shore, the Singletons find themselves faced with truths that will eventually define their future.

    An interesting class study unfolds within this story and brings with it few surprises. What class distinction meant in the fifties is still alive and well in today's society. How the Singletons deal with this class distinction is what makes this story a good one.

    Jack yearns for more than his marriage offers him while Ruth only wants to rise above her classification. Helen, a typical sixteen year old girl, wants to be considered desirable by the young men around her. Beth on the other hand, wants only to complete the requirements of the I-Spy Club.

    There are stories interwoven within this one that lead a reader to the satisfaction that their time reading this work was well spent. While the story's premise isn't a new one, it is well written and certainly worth the read.

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