Customer Reviews for

The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less

Average Rating 4
( 38 )
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(8)

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(22)

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(6)

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1 Star

(2)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

As someone constantly plauged with indecision, this book opened my eyes to what I'm doing and how it makes me unhappy. It was a relief to know that I'm not the only one who takes 30 minutes to decide between metal or wicker baskets to hold my DVDs in. It was also distur...
As someone constantly plauged with indecision, this book opened my eyes to what I'm doing and how it makes me unhappy. It was a relief to know that I'm not the only one who takes 30 minutes to decide between metal or wicker baskets to hold my DVDs in. It was also disturbing to see that my inability to decide will only lead me away from happiness. I had never thought in those terms before and this book made mre realize that I needed to make a change. This book is great for people who can't make a decision and wish they could!

posted by Anonymous on May 8, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Choice from the Psychology view

I was surprised to find a book about choice in the psychology section of the bookstore. As an avid reader in Economics, it was a unique experience to see how a pyschologist views utility and opportunity cost. The book moves the reader from the basics of satisfiers and m...
I was surprised to find a book about choice in the psychology section of the bookstore. As an avid reader in Economics, it was a unique experience to see how a pyschologist views utility and opportunity cost. The book moves the reader from the basics of satisfiers and maximizers thorough buyers regret. It is a good introduction to a complex topic. It was quite comical to see what the gold, silver and bronze medalists are thinking on the awards stand. Technically, the book is written at an 8th grade level, easy reading. Nonetheless, the book could use better editing where it drags at points. I give it a c+ because of editing problems.

posted by Anonymous on December 6, 2005

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2005

    Choice from the Psychology view

    I was surprised to find a book about choice in the psychology section of the bookstore. As an avid reader in Economics, it was a unique experience to see how a pyschologist views utility and opportunity cost. The book moves the reader from the basics of satisfiers and maximizers thorough buyers regret. It is a good introduction to a complex topic. It was quite comical to see what the gold, silver and bronze medalists are thinking on the awards stand. Technically, the book is written at an 8th grade level, easy reading. Nonetheless, the book could use better editing where it drags at points. I give it a c+ because of editing problems.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    No paradox

    Basically it's the law of diminishing marginal utility applied to the consumption of alternatives. But choosing what matters to invest time in (by going through the alternatives) is a choice in itself. The new question is: is this worth thinking about? Not groundbreaking, but a helpful reminder.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Eye opening book on choice.

    On the advice of a friend, I picked this up, and am glad I did. The author does an excellent job of supporting his hypothesis that "less is more" and that an abundance of choice has made our lives harder instead of easier.

    I learned a lot from the book. I learned about maximizers versus satisficers, what drives us to make decisions, and tools for simplifying dealing with the abundance of choices we face.

    The writing style can be a bit wordy, and at times I found myself reading and re-reading sentences and paragraphs in order to fully understand the meaning. It's not overly complex, but some sections can be a reading workout. However, the author does support all his arguments in a logical style, and the extra effort required for me to understand some of the more involved points was worth the effort.

    Worth the read, and hard not to learn something from this.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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