Customer Reviews for

Paul of Dune (Heroes of Dune Series #1)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

The Conquests of Paul

Until I had started reading his works in collaboration with Brian Herbert, my opinion of Kevin Anderson wasn't extraordinarily favorable. His forays into the world of Star Wars seemed like overambitious fan fiction, cutting too many corners and becoming notorious in my ...
Until I had started reading his works in collaboration with Brian Herbert, my opinion of Kevin Anderson wasn't extraordinarily favorable. His forays into the world of Star Wars seemed like overambitious fan fiction, cutting too many corners and becoming notorious in my view for using too many flimsy metaphors. As a science fiction writer, however, he's really found a niche in the Dune series, and this latest offering is as fine an example as one could ask for. As with any book set in the Dune Universe, you really have to know your stuff, but, strangely, less so in this book than in others. There's less of the technical jargon here than in past novels by Anderson and Herbert, or at least they're not as emphasized in this novel. Instead the novel is spent on the characters and their motives, building their stories. Sometimes this effort is too brief, as the story switches between characters and archs in quick chapters. As much as this novel, and presumably its sequels, are intended to bridge the gap between Dune and Dune Messiah, it also feels like a reintroduction, and often feels dangerously close to becoming too expository. Still, by now any fan of the series will have grown to love the characters and settings to the point where any new stories involving them would be looked forward to. At this point, Herbert and Anderson have become so comfortable in their ownership of these characters and this setting that it all flows very well and is very enjoyable. My overall criticism of Paul of Dune is that it feels abbreviated, even for a series book. But this is only a mild distraction, and I deem it an entertaining read and a promising beginning for the rest of the Heroes of Dune Series.

posted by Anonymous on September 21, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

10 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

More Than Disappointing!!

I understand why Brian is riding on his fathers coattails, everyone's got to make a buck. I've read a few of his other attempts and they were ok I guess, not terrible, not great. But here, Brian and Anderson actually have the balls to overwrite Frank Herbert's finest wo...
I understand why Brian is riding on his fathers coattails, everyone's got to make a buck. I've read a few of his other attempts and they were ok I guess, not terrible, not great. But here, Brian and Anderson actually have the balls to overwrite Frank Herbert's finest work Dune! A novel that has been acclaimed by critics worldwide as one of the finest works of Science Fiction ever crafted.

Right out of the blue these two decide to make us believe that Dune (as written by Frank Herbert) wasn't entirely true. That when Paul was a child, Duke Leto attempted on not one, but two occasions to take a wife other than Jessica. Brian commits this assault against his father's finest work just to create a slimy under-plot to fill out this abortion of a book.
I'm beginning to realize that that if his father wasn't Frank Herbert, Brian would have never been published. Frank Herbert had more talent under one fingernail than any that Brian can honestly lay claim to. Where Frank sliced through intrigue with the skill of a swordmaster wielding a rapier, Brian stumbles about in the dark flailing with a battle hammer. And the addition of Anderson doesn't seem to help much.
A son should show more respect to his father.

posted by RichardB on March 26, 2010

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  • Posted November 13, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by LadyJay for TeensReadToo.com

    "I leave my footprints in history, even where I do not tread." <BR/><BR/>Paul Atreides, Maud'Dib to his loyal subjects, has unleashed a bloody Jihad across the universe. The old Emperor has fallen - his Imperium destroyed. It is now Paul's right and duty to erase Shaddam IV's reign from history and begin anew. <BR/><BR/>He will face many hardships along the way; assassination attempts, interplanetary wars, and deciphering who he can trust within his own household. And there is always the matter of the spice trade. "He who controls the spice, controls the universe" - a phrase that Maud'Dib understands all too well. <BR/><BR/>Paul will question his own motives and actions for ruling the universe, and eventually come to the realization that his decisions will shape the course of history. <BR/><BR/>PAUL OF DUNE was written to fit in between the original novel, DUNE, and its sequel, DUNE MESSIAH. Herbert and Anderson have attempted to bridge several gaps between the two novels, and have done so successfully. Fans of Dune will find their beloved characters, planets, and societies just as they left them. The authors do an incredible job of staying true to Frank Herbert's original vision of the Dune universe. <BR/><BR/>A great addition to an excellent series of books.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Paul of Dune

    This book goes back and forth from the time between the books of "Dune" and "Dune Messiah", and the time of a young Paul growing up on Caladan. What I especially love about this book, is how it revisit's the House Trilogy, and reminds me of all that I had forgotten of the Atreides, Corrino, and Harkonnen families. Beginning one year after the fall of Shaddam IV, the book goes into the Jihad's beginnings, the destruction of the Landsraad, and Princess Irulan's role as the wife of Paul-Maud'Dib. It goes into graphic detail of Paul's Fedaykin fighters' their hedonistic faith in him, their beliefs that they are carrying out his holy orders in bloody violence, without mercy, as they travel throughout the planets of the Imperium. Shaddam IV, exiled to Salusa Secundus, is desperate and asks for Fenring's help. Irulan is writing another book on the life of Paul-Maud'Dib about his childhood.
    It starts with the politically arranged marriage between House Atreides and House Ecaz, and the troubles it causes Jessica and young Paul. When the only son of House Moritani dies because of a house feud, the War of Assassins begins.
    Disguised Paul-Maud'Dib joins his men in the fighting, and discovers about himself that he is not like his father Duke Leto. Jessica and Gurney return to Arrakis and report to Paul that the people see him as a tyrant, even those on Caladan. The Sisterhood requests a meeting with Marie, and is forced to leave her in the hands of her parents. Fenring uncovers the Tleilaxu-bred Kwisatz Haderach! Irulan wonders why Chani is not pregnant. The construction of the Citadel of Maud'Dib under Swordmaster Bluddi's architectural vision continues.
    Young Paul's story continues when Duke Leto is forced into the War of Assassins, because of an attempt on Paul's life. The joined armies of Leto and Armand attack Grumman. After the Landsraad meeting, were Viscount Moritani receives a slap on the wrist from Shaddam for violating the rules of the War of Assassins, he demands that the Harkonnen army join his in order to defend against the invasion. Because the Baron wants to remain anonymous in Moritani's revengeful war, the Baron is blackmailed in order for Moritani to keep their secret. Duncan and Paul seek refuge on the Eastern Continent, to keep Paul safe. They are tracked and hunted, until Paul convinces Duncan to return, to fight by his father's side.
    The first stage of the construction of the Citadel of Maud'Dib is completed. Paul holds the Great Surrender ceremony in the awe-inspiring Celestial Audience Hall. There is an assassination attack on Paul's life. Irulan's heart is hardened when her younger sister Rugi is an innocent victim of the attack. On Thalidei, Thallo and Marie are joined together for lessons, to learn from and teach one another. Marie is encouraged to use her deadly skills when Thallo tries to destroy the Theilaxu Kwisatz Haderach program. Shaddam IV intervenes in the war on Grumman, to prevent it from getting out of control. With the capture of Viscount Moritani, the Baron must act to protect himself and his house. Naturally consistent, Beast Rabban proves that he is not smart enough to lead, but just clever enough to survive.
    Paul's demand to speak with the Navigator and his prescience, gives him a resolution to his battle with Memnon Thorvald, Shaddam's supporter. A visit from Maria to stay at the Citadel of Maud'Dib, gives Alia a chance to be a child, and is

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2014

    This book fills in missing pieces in the Dune Universe

    This book fills in some of the missing pieces that Frank Herbert left out of the original series. Anyone hooked on the Dune universe will like this one

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  • Posted January 22, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Paul of Dune

    As with the rest of the Dune series, Paul of Dume extends the stories another step with the knowledge of Paul's life.. Over the years I have read all the books in this series along with the lives of the main characters. I'm very happy that the author's son has seen fit to continue the expansion of the series...

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  • Posted April 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Paul the Changeling

    Yet another amazing installment in the Dune saga. Paul is such a dynamic character, one you fall in love with from the first book, and never seem to know enough about after how many novels the guy is in. It was great to have a book almost solely dedicated to him and his life, yet there are still many questions left unanswered. The additional side characters were a perfect compliment. It was nice to learn more about Princess Irulan and how she was able to adapt and evolve in Maud Dib's court. The speckles of Harkonen and Corinno story lines were a nice touch of mild villains to the overall work. It also lent more of the evil genius role to Paul himself and all the challenging decisions he was faced with at such a young age. I loved how the story interwove with the time frame right after the take over of Dune and the early years of Paul's life while his father was still alive back on Caladan. However, I do think there are some discrepancies in the timelines and story lines introduced in this book and what was in the original series. However, it will take me a little time to re-read them and check it out. It is about time I revisited the series anyway. I look forward to more and will be heartbroken when there are no more Dune stories coming out.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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