Customer Reviews for

Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2005

    The book should be judged for your self.

    When I went to the Barnes and Noble website to find the note from the publisher I read the reviews as well. Some of the reviews made me angry, because the reviewers kind of missed the whole point of the book I thought, which was to explain how and why motherhood has changed throughout the years, and how another culture can live perfectly without this anxiety over their shoulders all the time. It doesn't mean that we are bad mothers, dislike our kids, or hate our role as a mother. Its a fact that motherhood is a difficult job. Any job that holds you acountable for another human beings life, is definetly an important role. Looking at the big picture of life with everything that could go along with it is a difficult job. It is nice to hear that someone else recognizes this anxiety that so many mothers don't want to admit they have (if some times, or all the time.) because they need to keep their stereo type of a mother that society makes them need to live up to,(it is the era of Martha Stewart) and through history what could have caused us to mother the way we do. I feel like we could be better mothers if we could parent the way we want from what ever methods prefered, without a culture sculpting the way we should FEEL about the way we do it. Like the subject that all mothers bring up sometime in 'mommy conversations' about punishing your child in public.... what will someone else think as they watch me do the punishing, am I doing it right, am I abusing the child, does the child need a good spanking, if I don't punish because I'm afraid of what someone might think is my kid now a little brat? maybe the kid didn't do anything wrong, so now Im just a stressed out mother that takes it out on her kids, and how do I explain to the older lady that spanking is not the answere? This book could help you realize a lot of cultural differences in how we mother, and open your eye to make you realize that your anxiety is not because you are a bad mother it's only a guilt that is caused by our society and culture. I recommend this book. It wont stay on my book shelf either, because it will be passed to one friend, then on to another.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2007

    No solutions

    I enjoyed reading this book because it reinforced how crazy we, as mothers, have gotten. And it's nice to see that we're all pretty much in the same boat, albeit a sinking boat. What I didn't like about the book was that it didn't give any solutions to our problems. The book went on and on about how through history we GOT to where we are (anxiety- & guilt-ridden, frazzled parents) but it doesn't give many suggestions on what we can do about it! I'd like to know how to stop this madness!!?!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2006

    A good read

    Judith Warner successfully exposed a strong view being held by some groups of professional women about motherhood in the new millennium. It is all about securing career growth while being a mother, a path that demands less presence by the mother in the life of her child(ren), while at the same time is fraught with the pressure to be the ideal mum that children always dream about, the mother who is always there when needed. It is a rising conflict in motherhood in the rapidly professional America where the specter of single parent families is growing everyday. However I think this book should have toned down its strong feminist perspective.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2005

    addressed, but not answered

    I somewhat enjoyed this book - it's relieving to read others have these same problems. The only thing that derailed me was the comparison between French & American parents. Europe has smaller families - if any, and the French are having major problems with their youths - mainly because they aren't allowed to work until after the age 18 (so as not to take away jobs from elders)- so the kids are problems - just ask any French parent with kids these ages. Yeah, it's easy to sit in a cafe & drink wine. Maybe I should try that.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2005

    There's no manual for motherhood!

    I live in the DC area, and I have never lived in an area that is so concentrated with highly-educated, yet insecure and neurotic mothers. It's as if they had all the confidence in the world when they ran businesses, made laws, and generally ran the world. Yet, motherhood has them completely baffled. There is no 'right' or 'wrong' way to mother; I never got ushered back and forth to multiple language, creative enrichment, or ballet classes throughout my childhood in a Land Rover. I'm sure the vast majority of women in this world didn't, and we all turned out okay. The media, combined with our culture of consumption, has painted a picture of modern motherhood that is bleak and impossible to achieve, at best. This book, and The Mommy Myth, go a long way to describe the hell some women seemed trapped inside. However, what this book fails to point out is that the solution lies within the mother. If you don't like your life and feel trapped, then why don't you go get a job, or fill your day with doing things to fulfill your personal goals instead of living through a four year old. That type of motherhood will smother your children and raise a whole generation of neurotic, co-dependent children.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2005

    A book for part time mothers, full time ladder climbers

    This author wages an all out attack on attachment parenting (ie: breastfeeding) and believes that a woman that decides to be a stay at home mom is throwing it all away by 'depriving herself and, therefore, depriving her children.' Her view seems to be that a woman doesn't get any satisfaction from raising her children and that it's actually a chore. I'm sorry, but if you feel this way, then perhaps you really should rethink whether or not to have children. I'm returning this book to the store; it doesn't have a place on my bookshelves.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2005

    Half the story

    While I commend Judith Warner for continuing the discussion of motherhood and it's challenges, I can't help but feel that this is half the story--where is mention of mothers who are, for the most part, enjoying their lives? It seems to me that Warner recorded each mom's lowest thought at her lowest moment, but never asked about the high points, or the things we do get right. Why no names with the quotes? Would the women have changed their words if they thought there would be attribution, or are the quotes meant to represent a composite of what Warner found to be true? In the end, there is much thought devoted to the problems some modern mothers face, but very little talk about how to help each other, or steps to take to change the situation. I'd have enjoyed the book much more if it devoted time to discussing answers to the many questions it raises.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2005

    Falling off the treadmill

    I definitely related to parts, but wished the focus groups would have been broader. The outcome after reading was that I was somewhat depressed to partially have my situation recognized, addressed, and come to the same conclusion as myself that there needs to be a change. NO ONE knows what the answer is; just how are we to remedy the situation is the problem.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1