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Peril in the Palace

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted August 20, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I love the alliterative titles to each of the Imagination Statio

    I love the alliterative titles to each of the Imagination Station book series. They are memorable and fun. Each story centers around cousins Beth and Patrick, and mysterious notes that send them on exciting adventures. 




    I loved books like this when I was a child. And the mysterious notes that set the recurring main characters on their adventures spark readers’ imaginations—something that often gets ignored in today’s world. This series is loaded with exciting journeys into history. 




    Peril in the Palace, book three of The Imagination Station series, takes Beth and Patrick back in time to 1271 China, to once again keep the mysterious Mr. Albert out of prison. In this adventure, readers are introduced to Mongol warriors, Marco Polo, and Kublai Khan. There is a war against Christianity, and the cousins have to find a way through it, and must get a golden tablet from Kublai Khan to keep Mr. Albert free. 




    As an adult, I wasn’t real familiar with this time period, so it was a learning adventure even for me. Kids need this kind of exploration into the past, and the fact that it’s infused with lessons of friendship and Christian principles makes it all the more valuable.




    I’m a kid at heart, so I enjoyed reading each of the Imagination Station books, and I applaud the author for making clean, Christian adventure books available to today’s young explorers.

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  • Posted August 12, 2014

    I love this series. The earlier books, however, I don't like as

    I love this series. The earlier books, however, I don't like as much as the later books. This book was about China and Marco Polo. In the later books, you learn more about the historical characters which I liked. This one is more of an adventure story with some real characters thrown in and a bit about their customs. My kids loved the story and were engaged for the whole reading of it.

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  • Posted August 1, 2014

    Peril in the Palace is Patrick and Beth¿s third adventure in Mr.

    Peril in the Palace is Patrick and Beth’s third adventure in Mr. Wittaker’s Imagination Station. They are on a quest to get a tablet of Kubli Khan, an ancient Mongolian emperor. Along the way, they meet Marco Polo and his family, outwit some shamans, and encounter giant eagles called rocs.

    This book is a fun adventure for young kids, written at an easy reading level. The two cousins in the story show bravery by standing up for what they believe in, in front of a disbelieving emperor and his guards. The story shows a bit of what ancient Chinese and Mongolian culture was like through the eyes of children. After the kids complete their quests, there is a cliffhanger ending, leading into the following book.

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  • Posted July 8, 2014

    Peril in the Palace takes Beth and Patrick to China where they m

    Peril in the Palace takes Beth and Patrick to China where they meet Marco Polo. Not our favorite Imagination Station book but it was a fun adventure and we look forward to continue to read the series.  
    4 stars.

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  • Posted July 7, 2014

    A good book for young children A good book in the Imagination S

    A good book for young children

    A good book in the Imagination Station series. Unlike some of the other books in the series, however, this one is not a stand alone - you need to read the book following (if not the books before) to really get the broader storyline. This book didn't seem to carry any "lessons" like some other books in the series do, but everything considered, it's still a good read for young children.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2014

    This is a good book for kids who like Ancient China. In this boo

    This is a good book for kids who like Ancient China. In this book Patrick and Beth go to China in the 13th century looking for the golden tablet of Kublai Khan. They are rescued from Mongol warriors by Marco Polo. He takes them to see Kublai Khan and when Patrick shows him a windup toy rooster he locks them in prison because he thinks they have power over an evil bird spirit. While Patrick and Beth say farewell to Marco Polo, a girl named Beki slips into the prison cell with them and gives them a golden tablet. They then escape with nails that Mr. Whittaker gave them. Two giant eagles grab them and carry them to their nest. A knight comes to rescue them long enough for them to get into the Imagination Station. They are now in a cave in an unknown time period. My favorite part is where Beth uncovers the shamans tricks. This is a good book for kids ages 8-11.
    By: Joshua, age 10.

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  • Posted August 14, 2012

    Lots of fun

    Cousins Beth & Patrick are on a great adventure, traveling to find Kublai Khan in 1271 - all they need is one of his golden tablets, to save Mr. Whittaker's relative Albert. They get into the Imagination Station (a time machine of sorts), packing some gifts Mr. Whittaker knows they will need, and off they go! When they arrive in China they make several (cultural) mistakes almost immediately, but are quickly saved by Marco Polo (yes, *that* Marco Polo). They travel with Marco and his family to the palace of Kublai Khan. Eventually they meet his granddaughter, Beki, who loves Jesus! It turns out that the gifts that Mr. Whittaker sent are timely and perfect, and they get the tablet they need. There's a bit of a cliffhanger at the end, too....

    I am looking forward to seeing more in this series, it was fun! I love the combination of history and fantasy. Well done!

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  • Posted August 3, 2011

    Peril in the Palace

    It wasn't until I saw a feature about Imagination Station on the Duggars(I don't remember which season) that I was introduced to Mr. Whitaker and the Adventures on Odyssey. Reading Peril in the Palace was my first adventure in Odyssey, though.

    It seems to be written for even the youngest of readers. It's very simple and there's pictures throughout the book.

    I would definitely have all four books ready and waiting. From the looks of this one, they all end with a major cliffhanger. It looks like you can read a couple of the books at The Imagination Station website. There's also activities, so definitely check it out if you're a Odyssey fan.
    Whit's End is also a page to check out. It has info on the radio shows.

    I really like that kids can have a fun, adventurous time in these books, and still be learning a bit of history in the process.

    ""Those costumes are great," Mr. Whitaker said. "You look just like Mongol children."

    "Did you say mongrel?" Beth asked. "That's what my dog is."

    Mr. Whitaker smiled. His kind eyes twinkled behind his round glasses.

    "No, Beth," Mr. Whitaker said. "I said Mon-gol. The Mongols ruled all of China in the thirteenth century. Today their country is called Mongolia.""

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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