Customer Reviews for

Petticoat Ranch

Average Rating 4.5
( 51 )
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5 Star

(35)

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(3)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

My favorite western, bar none!

This story starts out with a bang...as in non-stop action. I had to laugh at the girls fighting all the time and poor Clay not knowing how to handle all the woman 'stuff' because he'd never been around them much. Ironically that primitive mentality made him all that mor...
This story starts out with a bang...as in non-stop action. I had to laugh at the girls fighting all the time and poor Clay not knowing how to handle all the woman 'stuff' because he'd never been around them much. Ironically that primitive mentality made him all that more attractive as a hero. He's a real man's man and as such, the very tomboyish girls and his new wife go out of their way to perpetuate that belief...by acting incompetent when they are just as good with a gun and lasso as any man on the frontier. Many of the scenes made me smile. Connealy is very witty and her caveman humor is to-die-for funny! Plus, she has the dialogue down to a science...even had me thinking like a western yokel. :) Hilarious! A lot of times romantic tension in novels feels contrived and the animosity forced. Not so in this one. Sophie had every reason to want to chokehold the man and kiss him senseless all in the same breath. Wow. I loved that. She's fiesty and loveable without feeling forced by the author. Did I mention that I love marriages of convenience stories? The only thing in this one that made me snicker is the hero kisses her breathless a few times and later on she's feeling faint! I had no idea they'd consummated their relationship. Made me go back and search for what I was missing. Must've been that warm snuggling Clay referenced in his thoughts that got her 'in the family way.' I know, you're snickering, too. Maybe it was the publisher's idea to skip that, but it made me smile regardless. :) The most satisfying of all was the culmination at the end. Without giving away the details I'll just say that it reminded me a lot of the Home Alone movies. One exciting event after another. Tough girls who know how to survive and a momma who taught them well. In the end I felt just as proud of them all as if I'd been there myself. I'd totally bought into the plot and my heart was with the couple through to the last page. Tender and sweet, tough and calculating, adventurous and passionate...this story has it all. It's now at the top of my list of favorite historical westerns. It's the best one I've ever read, bar none.

posted by MichelleSutton on January 29, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Characters actions seem unlikely

Let me preface this review with informing you that I am a Christian so my poor review is not based on any hostility, etc towards religion. In my opinion, this shouldn't be classified as a romance. The focus was definitely on morality, religion, and western survival. ...
Let me preface this review with informing you that I am a Christian so my poor review is not based on any hostility, etc towards religion. In my opinion, this shouldn't be classified as a romance. The focus was definitely on morality, religion, and western survival. I just thought the characters acted a little inconsistently. Sophie, a tough as nails rancher who now lives in a thicket, has no urge to marry again after the poor treatment she received from her first husband. She has turned down multiple offers after being widowed. Upon first meeting her brother-in-law who believes they should marry, she agrees. Why? He offered no words of love. She doesn't seem to NEED a man. Why wouldn't the book be about him trying to convince her to marry him after showing he is nothing like his brother? And, just after being married a month, she finds out she's pregnant? She must be very fertile...and has a sixth sense about this because I don't know anyone who can figure it out that quickly without an EPT. This woman who wanted nothing to do with another man not only marries quickly but immediately knows him in the Biblical sense without a fight or even discussion? That's taking wifely obediance a little too seriously. Clay (the hero) has never been around women but immediately offers to marry Sophie because there's something in the Bible about taking care of your brother's widow. I do know the quote but I think that he jumped on that passage pretty quickly. The TWO men who hear Sophie calling through thousands of miles for her help seemed a little farfetched. Sophie complains about how poorly the townspeople treated her but as soon as she's married, suddenly they welcome her back in the fold? Either the author is trying to portray these Christian people as hypocrites, opportunists or completely fickle. And I always hate an ending where the person conveniently has twins. Especially when its not genetically linked on the father's side at all.

posted by Anonymous on March 11, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2007

    Characters actions seem unlikely

    Let me preface this review with informing you that I am a Christian so my poor review is not based on any hostility, etc towards religion. In my opinion, this shouldn't be classified as a romance. The focus was definitely on morality, religion, and western survival. I just thought the characters acted a little inconsistently. Sophie, a tough as nails rancher who now lives in a thicket, has no urge to marry again after the poor treatment she received from her first husband. She has turned down multiple offers after being widowed. Upon first meeting her brother-in-law who believes they should marry, she agrees. Why? He offered no words of love. She doesn't seem to NEED a man. Why wouldn't the book be about him trying to convince her to marry him after showing he is nothing like his brother? And, just after being married a month, she finds out she's pregnant? She must be very fertile...and has a sixth sense about this because I don't know anyone who can figure it out that quickly without an EPT. This woman who wanted nothing to do with another man not only marries quickly but immediately knows him in the Biblical sense without a fight or even discussion? That's taking wifely obediance a little too seriously. Clay (the hero) has never been around women but immediately offers to marry Sophie because there's something in the Bible about taking care of your brother's widow. I do know the quote but I think that he jumped on that passage pretty quickly. The TWO men who hear Sophie calling through thousands of miles for her help seemed a little farfetched. Sophie complains about how poorly the townspeople treated her but as soon as she's married, suddenly they welcome her back in the fold? Either the author is trying to portray these Christian people as hypocrites, opportunists or completely fickle. And I always hate an ending where the person conveniently has twins. Especially when its not genetically linked on the father's side at all.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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