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Phantom (Sword of Truth Series #10)

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

AMAZING

I love all terry goodkind books, although pillars of creation was a little boring only because it was all about jensen, but i think that the author has a great imagination and sense of creation that he writes into these books. Some of these things I would have never tho...
I love all terry goodkind books, although pillars of creation was a little boring only because it was all about jensen, but i think that the author has a great imagination and sense of creation that he writes into these books. Some of these things I would have never thought out. I'm sad that there is only one more in this series, that I still have to get to, because I have fallen in love with Richard and Kahlan and several others characters I though I never would, like Chase, Nicci, and Cara. This story is about Richard trying to find Kahlan, and dealing with the 'final battle the seeker must lead.' Shota is involved in this book, and so is Samuel. You also see Kahlan's chapters and get another look and Jagang, just so you can hate him more. I recommend this book, but only if you've read the first 9.

posted by love-to-read-teen on February 22, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Redundant Plots

On each of the books of this series, the plot revolves around Richard or Khalan being held captive. It seems the author has no more ideas than this. TG it seems cant think of any other way to make his plots. Such redundant plots makes this series annoying.

posted by 595486 on December 26, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    Redundant Plots

    On each of the books of this series, the plot revolves around Richard or Khalan being held captive. It seems the author has no more ideas than this. TG it seems cant think of any other way to make his plots. Such redundant plots makes this series annoying.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    AMAZING

    I love all terry goodkind books, although pillars of creation was a little boring only because it was all about jensen, but i think that the author has a great imagination and sense of creation that he writes into these books. Some of these things I would have never thought out. I'm sad that there is only one more in this series, that I still have to get to, because I have fallen in love with Richard and Kahlan and several others characters I though I never would, like Chase, Nicci, and Cara. This story is about Richard trying to find Kahlan, and dealing with the 'final battle the seeker must lead.' Shota is involved in this book, and so is Samuel. You also see Kahlan's chapters and get another look and Jagang, just so you can hate him more. I recommend this book, but only if you've read the first 9.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 5, 2008

    Not that Great, but go ahead and read it.

    Goodkind likes to hear himself talk; he should stop preaching and try a little editing. I've read them all and they just seem to get progressively worse. Maybe I'm tiring of his over emphasis on torture and a sadistic, uber hate complex going on with the women. Dude, enough of the rape thing; move on.<BR/><BR/>He has some good stuff, but it's hard not to start skimming through his 8th grader dialog. Choke down the fluff, and move to the good parts, and it's worth sitting through all 10, 11, or 12 of them; whatever.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2006

    It started out sooooo well.....now a literary whimper

    This started out as an incredible series. Original premise, interesting 3 dimensional characters and a unique world. I don't know what happened, but by Pillars, he was sliding. But I still cared about the people. But PHANTOM continued the slide down unfortunately. The lecturing is even worse then Chainfire. Shota the witch, spends 60 pages telling Richard that the Order is filled with bad people. And if you didn't get that message, Kahlan and others have experiences that show that the Order is filled with bad people. And if you STILL didn't get the message, we finally meet Jagang and he ponderously makes it clear that he is a bad person. The other thing that has grown is the arguing. Remember Chainfire where everyone spent their time arguing with Richard (you know the guy they are trusting as their savior). Well know everybody is arguing with everyone, often spending pages arguing about how certain spells work or don't work. Who cared other then TG? I was frustrated with page after page and only found about 30 pages to be interesting. The best line in the whole book? At the end, when they let us know that the next book is the final one! Thank goodness, we can put this tortured dog out of its misery. What a shame. He took an excellent concept and for whatever reason drained it of any interest. Personally, I blame the publishers, they had to know how bad it was getting. Of course, that's maybe why I got it for 40% off when it came out!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2006

    A very sloppy addition to the Sword of Truth

    The first 200 pages are potentially the most tedious first 200 pages I have ever read. We go from an advanced lesson on the complicated workings of spell analysis, to a detailed, gory narration of the Order¿s atrocities that makes you want to throw up, to a lecture on the Order¿s philosophy and why it¿s very bad, and finally, Shota shows up. Richard and Shota proceed to ramble over about ten different topics that are loosely connected and rather jarring. I thought the whole book might take place in that one room. The single most annoying problem with this book is the repetition. This occurs in four main ways: (1) repeated lectures that go on and on, (2) constant repetition of information that¿s already been established, (3) simple repetitive writing, and (4) repeated dialogue. (1): Goodkind spends way too much time on lecture. We understand why the Imperial Order is bad and why life is good one lecture would suffice and then showing-and-telling would carry us nicely through the whole book. But instead, everywhere Richard goes, every new person he encounters, we have to wade through the whole lecture again. (2): Goodkind constantly repeats information we already know, as if we¿re idiots and can¿t remember something he said the page before. And I kid you not, he repeats bits of ¿critical info¿ pages apart. Along that line, he is also obsessed with reminding you of things every chance he gets. My favorite involves Magda Searus. Berdine if you will: ¿Magda Searus. You know, the one who was made into a Confessor.¿ In case you missed that: Again, Nicci, if you please (one page later): ¿Magda Searus, the woman who became the first Confessor...¿ Now, do people having conversations really keep repeating things to each other they already know? The book is full of this. (3): The third repetition is simply stylistic. Goodkind seems obsessed with making absolutely sure you got what he wrote, so he repeats certain concepts and descriptions repeatedly, sometimes in the same paragraph, as if the first mention wasn¿t powerful enough. The writing therefore lacks confidence and weakens itself when he¿s trying to make it strong. And then there¿s dialogue (4): The best example of this are cases in which Richard says something like this: ¿Is there anything, anything at all you can tell me about such-and-such, any last scrap that might help?¿ Shota (for example): ¿Sorry, Richard, that¿s everything I could possibly, conceivably pull from my brain.¿ They continue to talk, then Richard asks again: ¿Is there anything more, anything you can tell me?¿ Shota: ¿Oh, well, there is this one thing...¿ Why didn¿t she say so before!? The dialogue is very disorganizes and instead of editing the conversations to flow in one direction, characters keep remembering information where before they had said everything. Overall, this book is very sloppy. I am almost certain he did not read through and give his finished work that much editing, nor did the publishers. It shows. I even found a lot of typos and missing words, more than I usually do in published books. That being said, the latter half of the book does get better as characters start going off on adventures and the plot thickens as they say. True fans will be able to look through the mess and get a feel for that ole¿ Goodkind plotting and puzzle solving, and even grip the book to find out where it all leads, but you do at all times have to read through the mess. Familiar themes appear, familiar situations, the separation, the captivity and torture, even familiar evils appear (hello boxes of Orden). But this book felt more suitable to a child audience this time around (if it weren't for the sickening gore). I¿m saddened at what¿s become of the Sword of Truth series. The first four were great, then he started to lecture, then he had two books that you may as well skip. With Chainfire I thought he had it again, but he lost it again with Phantom. This book is the Phantom. Goodkind cast the chainfire spell on book 7

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2006

    Bleah, not again

    I don't know why I do this to myself. I loved the first book in this series, even though the writing was clunky, because it was passionate and interesting. Now after so many 'Richard is searching for missing Kahlan' stories I truly can't stand it anymore. Goodkind is clearly making this stuff up as he goes along and is stringing it along to milk it for the money. The person who said it was becoming a comic book is so right. There just nothing left to this story anymore. Long past time to end the series.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2006

    Beware Its a Trap!

    I have anticipated this book, purchased it immediately and was very disappointed to be treated to the endless captivity and humilation of the main characters. As an avid reader of the series, I feel that the author has mistreated his readers, mistreated his own craft and dishonored the story. This should have been the last book. Enough with the mild S&M fantasies of capture, torture and humiliation of the main characters. As a reader I feel as trapped and abused as the characters. I am now searching the previous books to find other characters mentioned so I can be prepared when they are brought back, mentioned and rewriten just to sell another in the series. There is a point even in torture where they execute the prisioner.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2005

    We don't want it!

    Please, please, spare us the agony of reading this book. We don't want it. As I noted in a review of Chainfire, this series is limping along as badly as its main protagonist. The pain Lord Rahl constantly endures is matched only by the reader¿s own suffering effort to slog through such pathetic, repetitive, unoriginal prose. No matter how many wakeful nights and broken sleeps Richard bears, he cannot be as tired as the reader after encountering yet another vapid, platitudinous remark about free will and fighting for what¿s right. Richard is about as multi-dimensional as the period at the end of this sentence. I'd not recommend this book to anyone over age 10. But if you care nothing for writing as an art and instead only want to help Goodkind make money, go ahead and buy this book. Just don't read it, or else you might die of vicarious embarrassment. Please note that I think it's silly to rate a book before one has read it, but Goodkind's stories are so predictable that I'm quite certain this one will be terrible.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2007

    Just get to the point plz!!!

    Well, I have never read the first of this series. I was walking through the B&N store and decided to judge a book by its cover. So, i ended up reading the third book first. After that, it was pointless to read the first one. May I add, what a fantastic artist for the covers. BravO!!! Well, about Phantom, sometimes Terry just drags on and on with borrying details. Some characters sound really dumn at times when Richard has to explain every single detail. If I understand, then a wizard or Kahlan should as well. And, I thought he said this was his last book. I read and read and reached the last chapter realizing he couldn't possibly finish the story in one chapter. I was really, REALLY, disappointed and felt like he is taking advantage of some good readers. Not good :( Also, when is he going to release the last book after all? I am tired of waiting.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2006

    Disappointed yet again

    I have read every single book in this series. It has continued to go down hill and like others, I am wondering, when will it end? I have read that there is one more book in the final trilogy. I intend for that to be the final book I read from this author. Like in the Wheel of Time saga, it has gone on far too long. I found myself skimming through much of the book because I got tired of hearing about one lady's personal observations in the war camp. The side tracks that takes you away from the story are unimportant and although a previous reviewer says it is all for a purpose, I can say there is no way to tie in all the side tracks and make it worth my time. I found myself wanting to skip paragraphs, then pages and eventually a whole chapter that I simply skimmed over. If I am going to pay the extra money for a hard back edition for my collection, I would like very much for it to be worth the money. I am tired people. Let it end. If the dream walker doesn't die in the next book, I am going to take care of him myself. Jajang must die....

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2006

    Terry sure is impressed with himself

    I stopped reading after Pillars of Creation. I loved this series with a passion up until then. Goodkind has dragged this series out. I love long never ending series as long as stuff happens but ever since the blood of the fold nothing has progressed. Darken Rahl had a much stronger grip on the world than Jagang and Richard took care of him in one book. Why has this namby pamby Emperor been such a problem when Richard has an army and powers to fight back with? Oh and whatever happened to Kahlan having a baby? I thought that a male confessor with both sides of magic would have been a great story. Imagine Richard and Kahlan having to fight their own son. That would have made a much more interesting story. Come on Terry please write something interesting and quit patting yourself on the back for being so intellectual. I have a bible and if I need some moral lessons I'll read it or my poly sci book. My advice to new readers is to stop after wizard's first rule.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2006

    Please put us out of our misery....

    I have been a fan of this series since I started in on it years ago. This book is a total let down when compaired to all other books that preceded it. I ditched work early the day of its release just to pick up this book. Sad to say I should have stayed later for the hours. I probably skimmed thru a solid 7 chapters of just plain non sense and meaningless filler. Sure, there was plenty of action and story building going on here, but for the most part I couldnt manage to stay awake to enjoy this latest from Mr. Goodkind. On the bright side, I am looking forward to the next and 'last' volume in this series. Don't want to spoil it for anyone reading, but the last few chapters of this book were just amazing, its just too bad that the rest of the book was just filler.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2006

    end it!

    First off I enjoy these books and I'll read this one, but mainly because it's supposed to be the last. Every book in this series is a small peice of the larger story, I get that, but 80-90% of each book is not really needed to move the larger story along. There's alot of fill. For instance, the Pillars of Creation did nothing for the story line. A few characters were added and some 'action', but nothing that seems necessary was added. I'm also bored with the love story. The most interesting part of any love story is the anticipation of the two people getting together. Once they get together it's boring. I think he realized that he actually got them together way too soon in the story line and had to manufacture things to separate them to then artifically create separation anxiety. If it's so easy to separate them why hasn't one of them been killed? They are so vulnerable yet still remain indestructable. That's very run of the mill tension but it's hidden in lofty writing. I also find that Richard has been given a 'superman' persona. Everytime he's faced with somethingn surely insurmountable, he 'mysteriously' has some other power that we didn't know about (even he didn't know about) that is used to neatly solve the problem. Oh, and we usually find out about that in the last few chapters. There are some very redeeming qualities to this series though which do make me come back to the stories. Things like the Mord Sith and the Palace of the Prophecies, etc. But unfortunatly all of these were burned out in the first few books. I think that he should've wrapped up a first series with the defeat of Darken Rahl and then started a second series against Jagang and the Order. Overall these books are a good read and I recommend them, but the middle books are contain many similar situations with endings that wrap things up but in most cases just 'happen'. It's like he's trying to create a twist but misses it. A good twist is one that should be obvious and with plenty of clues but you miss it and then when it happens you realize 'Oh yeah! How did I miss that it was so obvious.' With these twists you really aren't given the information you need so you have no way to guess at what might happen. So it's less of a twist or more of a 'i'm going to make stuff up to wrap this up in the next two chapters'. Just my two cents. The first few books are GREAT, then they trail off and we'll see about the last one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    Great book

    Great book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2007

    All good things MUST come to an end.

    Ok, Mr Goodkind, it is time for an end to your tale.. I did rate Phantom as reccomended, but with reservations... but with reservations...but with reservations. Now does that sound familiar... WE KNOW THE BIG BAD DUDE IS EVIL..So please end a good story (but with alot of repitions) Just a little request...make attempts at Trilogies...you'll sell a heap of them

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Fans of Terry Goodkind┬┐s long running epic will enjoy this

    When Khalan Amnell awakens she remembers nothing except her name. Her spouse, the Seeker of Truth, Richard Rahl needs to liberate Khalan from the Chainfire spell that devastated her memories and that of those who knew her before the enchantment in other words ¿hid¿ her in plain sight. ------------- While Richard lives a nightmare trying to save the only person he seems to care about, Khalan accompanies the evil three Sisters of the Dark (Armina, Cecilia, and Ulicia) though she is confused as to why. The malevolent trio has plans for the powerful Khalan who can destroy the current world replacing it with the dark forces. At the same time that a despondent Richard searches in a phantom zone and Khalan journeys towards her destiny, Emperor Jagang pollutes the pure magic in order to conquer the world only Richard and Khalan can stop the Emperor and the Three Sisters, but he must find her and his stripped magic while she must find her memory and control of her magic.------------------- Though in some ways PHANTOM feels like a set up novel bringing the threads closer together until the final climax (allegedly the next book) and the subplots include repeats of the back story, fans of Terry Goodkind¿s long running epic will appreciate what is happening to Khalan and Richard. The story line is character driven by the ensorcelled Khalan and the frightened for his wife Richard. Readers will want to peruse this entry that is the salad for hopefully a gourmet delight.-------- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2006

    A guaranteed classic

    The Sword of Truth series has captivated many readers for over a decade. Terry Goodkind has, thus far, masterfully depicted a world of deception and betrayal, where life is not only cheap but fleeting. Still, the world closely mimics our own in terms of attitudes and social issues. He has a strong theme of nature versus nurture, love over coming all and the right of individual freedom. He has done what most overlook when creating a protagonist he has depicted Richard Rahl as a man of morale fiber unmatched in todays society. He has created a man who you want to read about and want to cheer for, someone who you can look up too. You will find yourself wanting to live up to his ideals in the real world and find the Wizard's Rules a useful guide down lifes journey. Phantom has the potential to be a great book. My personal favorite in the series thus far is Faith of the Fallen, but all have been entertaining, mentally stimulating and thought provoking. In spite of the fact that this is the tenth book in a series of novels which are usually close to 1,000 pages in length, I look forward to this sequel. Having read all ten of his previous stories, I can say without a doubt, that if you even remotely liked any of his previous works, Phantom will be a must purchase. SIDE NOTE: if you ever get the chance to hear him speak, it will be worth the trip. I traveled from St. Paul Minnesota to the Omaha Healing Center in Nebraska, which his sister owns, and he lectured for over three hours. A very intelligent man of unwavering convictions who strongly believes in every word he writes. I Strongly recommend these William Shakespeare titles in addition to the related titles below Hamlet, MacBeth and Much Ado About Nothing. Related titles: The Death Gate Cycle and the Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Wies and Tracy Hickman The Dark Elf trilogy, The Icewindale trilogy and The Demon Wars saga by R.A. Salvatore The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien & The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2014

    A good read

    I have really enjoyed this whole series. The characters are earnest and the storyline is entertaining, if perhaps a bit predictable. By the end of this book, I was getting a little weary of being beaten over the head with the Ayn Rand-ian lectures. Nonetheless, it was a very engaging part of the series, and I couldn't wait to pick up the next book when I finished.

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  • Posted July 21, 2014

    My favorite series of all time

    This series is awesome, I have re read the entire thing 4 or 5 times now. Richard and Kahlan are such dynamic characters that it's hard not to love them. And really all the secondary characters are so lovable too.

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  • Posted January 17, 2014

    Goodkind does it again

    Very well done. With so many previous books in the series its gotta be hard to be original, but Goodkind does a very good job of keepin the story going. Good fascinating writing. Enjoy!

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