Customer Reviews for

The Pilgrims

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted July 27, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    See full review @ The Indigo Quill . blogspot . com I can be ac

    See full review @ The Indigo Quill . blogspot . com

    I can be accused of judging a book based on the genre it’s from. Fantasy is one of those genres for me. Apart from a few exceptions and classics, fantasy is one of those genres that is littered with busty elves and all powerful Gandalf knock-off wizards and talking dragons acting out one trope after another with shameless regularity. The beauty of The Pilgrims by Will Elliott is that he uses a lot of the same set pieces that make up trashy dime-a-dozen fantasy, but his vision and imagination make it seem like this is the first book I have ever read with wizards and talking dragons. 

    The scope of the world he invents and the depth of the characters immediately draws you in to the story. As expansive and detailed as the characters and setting are, Elliott never fails to keep you tightly focused on the individual details of the world and the personalities of the characters without getting bogged down with colorful and drawn-out descriptions. Most fantasy novels use pretty much the same system of magic, and it almost always ends up getting overblown and ruining the plot in one way or another. One of the greatest pieces of praise I can give Elliott is that his system of magic and casting is all his own. Some of the finer elements as to its mechanics aren’t revealed until the second and third books (yes it’s a part of a trilogy), but from the beginning you can tell it is something different than what you are used to reading about.

    The plot revolves around a young, normal man named Eric and his homeless, alcoholic friend Case. They find a door to another world and when they enter (with little more than a handgun that Case pilfered) they come to realize they may have been a bit too hasty jumping into a world very different from their own. They find themselves in a world of magic and unbelievable beauty juxtaposed by remarkable cruelty. Their arrival comes at a time of upheaval and civil war in the land of Levaal. In no time at all they are forced to fight for their lives in a war that is not their own. Eric and Case try to find their feet but find themselves at the center of everything. From homicidal mages to horrifying creatures, a mad king to hidden foes, they have their work cut out for them before things even get really dark. It pains me to give such an incomplete description, but any more could steal the journey away from any would-be readers. 

    I will just go ahead and say that this is one of the best books I have read all year (aside from the second book in the series that I’m currently reading). It isn't an intricately wrought Pulitzer contender, or a classic work of literature. The Pilgrims is, quite simply, an enjoyable, well thought-out, interesting story.

    I am saddened to hear that Will Elliott has distanced himself from the series after the completion of the trilogy. He has said that it isn’t the type of fiction that he should be writing and I can totally see where he’s coming from. His other works are of a deeper and more personal timbre and I can understand him feeling that his evocative voice is wasted on this brand of fiction but what might be his gain is certainly a loss for the genre. I found myself being really drawn into caring for the characters and what happens to them. The world and the setting are equally intriguing and interesting. I never once felt that I was being sentenced to sitting through yet another ”Portal to a fantasy realm”, “fish out of water” carbon copy. The story felt fresh, gritty and real without losing the sense of fantasy and adventure that you expect from a fantasy novel.

    The only criticism I can really give stems from the fact that this trilogy so far (again I am still on the second book, Shadow) seems like it is one long book cut into three parts almost arbitrarily.The ending of The Pilgrims doesn’t resolve as much as I would have hoped before picking up right where it left off in Shadow. Normally this wouldn’t be such a bad thing, but the second two books are increasingly hard to find in the U.S., especially in E-book format (legally). I would hope that wouldn’t turn anyone away from giving it a try though, because The Pilgrims and The Pendulum Trilogy this far are extremely worthwhile reads for any sci-fi, fantasy, or general fiction fan. Younger readers should avoid, because of some very adult content and violence. This shouldn’t be a follow up to Lord of the Rings as a bedtime story. When the kids are asleep, put on your wizard cap and your reading lamp and read yourself a bedtime story you’ll enjoy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1