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Plague Year (Plague Year Trilogy #1)

Average Rating 4
( 32 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    A Great Read

    After reading Plague Year I went back to B&N that week to get the next two books in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 4, 2008

    Attacking Virus!!!

    This book, "Plague Year" by Jeff Carlson has to do with a super virus called a nanotech by the people who fear it. So where did this nanotech start and what does it do? Well it started in northern California. The nanotech was a type of anti-virus that was thought to be made for medical nature and work (helpingly) inside the body. And boy does the virus work inside the body. The nanotech only works in warm blooded things like people, mammals, and birds. The reason for this is because the virus is carbon based, so flows through the air, and is breathed in by us. Once in the body of a living thing, the virus rapidly multiplies and burns the inside and out of its host. The good thing about the nanotech is that it burns out (dies) at about ten thousand feet. Because the virus kills people below ten thousand feet, many have been forced to live on mountain tops in order to survive. They live in groups, and are pretty much sitting, waiting for a cure to come from a group of scientists and astronauts in Colorado. Read the ending to find out if anyone survives, or if the last people alive to see another day!<BR/> This book is by far interesting, but it reminded me a lot of a movie called ¿I am Legend.¿ Both the book and that movie had to do with something going excessively wrong in the world, and few people living because of a world wide virus that swept through every nation. Even though they were quite similar, I would still say that ¿Plague Year¿ was a very interesting book. I personally really enjoyed this book because Jeff Carlson wrote with a lot of description and details. Because he wrote with so much detail, I could not put his book down. Books like ¿Plague Year¿ are the ones that turn into best sellers because people just want to keep reading. Towards the beginning, ¿Plague Year¿ leaves you kind of confused on how the characters got where they are, but it explains itself slowly. The other part that is hard to understand in the book is all of the characters names. Carlson puts many of the characters just right out there, and I struggled to keep them apart. If Carlson had not described the characters in unique ways, this would have been a hard read, but he did a great job! I would recommend this book to many people who like more, Sci-Fi stories.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2007

    Topnotch tech thriller

    I don¿t know why this book is categorized as science fiction. It says its like a Michael Crichton book on the cover and I think it¿s better than anything Michael Crichton ever wrote. State of Fear. Prey. Jurassic Park. All good books. This one¿s better. It¿s totally believable. It¿s scary as hell. Carlson doesn¿t bore you with the science either the way Crichton does sometimes. It¿s what would really happen if the human race got stuck suddenly in the highest mountains. It¿s not a huge book, its 300 pages and a quick read, but it has that ¿epic feel¿ because it goes back and forth over hundreds of miles and into the International Space Station. It also talks about the problems they have in the Andes, Alps, Himalayas and other places. If you¿re looking for an awesome read, this is it. Todd J.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2014

    Great story!

    Really enjoyed this and looking forward to reading the other 2 books in the trilogy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2012

    Recommended

    It really hasn't gotten my attention to continue reading. I read it when I am waiting in the Dr's office.

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  • Posted April 21, 2012

    Wow. It’s been a while since I’ve been so engrossed

    Wow. It&rsquo;s been a while since I&rsquo;ve been so engrossed in a book. Plague Year started with a bang, capturing my attention like a roller coaster. That&rsquo;s why it was so disappointing that the latter half of the book seemed to derail. The book revolves around a nanotech contagion that has killed most of the world&rsquo;s population, forcing the survivors to take refuge up in the mountains. Lacking resources, the survivors have devolved into warring groups of cannibals. I&rsquo;m always a sucker for these post-apocalyptic tales and adored Carlson&rsquo;s description of the initial plague.

    However, the book changes focus from these survivors to the remnants of the US government, now situated atop the Colorado Rockies. I really wanted to enjoy this storyline of the rebels and decaying government, but after the brutal darkness of the first half of the book, it just lacked the same narrative punch. And the contrived ending was likewise a disappointment. Not only that, but it was clearly a set up for the next book in the series. Carlson is a terrific thriller writer, but I felt the book transformed from a spellbinding novel into a movie with a neat and tidy conclusion. Although, it did pique my interest enough to check out the sequel.

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  • Posted May 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Disappointing

    I'm not exactly sure what to say here. A friend of mine was reading this and raved up and down about how good it was. He knows I like science fiction so when he was done he loaned it to me to read. Maybe I had heard too many good things about it and went in with high expectations. Maybe I read more sci-fi than him and am pickier about my stories. In any case, this book was a struggle from beginning to end. It always felt like a chore to read it and I was left feeling very unsatisfied.

    First of all, there are WAY too many characters. The first chapter alone introduces a dozen characters and only 2-3 are really important. Cam, Sawyer, their girlfriend and Price are the only ones that need to be named, all the other ones had me thoroughly confused and flipping back and forth to find out who was who. This is mainly a problem in the begining when you aren't familiar with who is important and who isn't. This gets worse because the chapters on the space station introduce even MORE new characters and by the end of the book, when all but 3-4 characters have disappeared or died, we get even MORE characters when the Special Forces become involved. Sound confusing? It is.

    That wasn't the only problem I had. For being such a dark, gruesome tale I don't remember anything particularly dark or gruesome. There was a lot of talk about cannibalism throughout but it was all "off camera" so to speak. I also never really felt that scared about the nanos, I think a scene or two could have detailed exactly what it felt like to be infected by them. Hearing about a character's pain and agony in the begining would've given the nanos a more monstrous feel in my opinion. Lastly, what's with the adult diapers at the end? I wouldn't have thought twice about how they were going to go to the bathroom in the suits if the author hadn't brought it up. Not to mention he brings it up again at the climax of the whole story. Oh, and did we really need Sawyer to talk like a baby at the end? It kind of ruined the image I had built up for him throughout the book.

    OK, I don't want this to be all bad... there were things I did like about it. The author seemed to care a lot about the little details of how a nano like archos would work and I appreciate the effort. I really liked Cam's side of the story in the begining, especially when Hollywood appears and leads them back. I didn't enjoy Ruth's chapters as much. The editing was great, I don't think I found a mistake the entire time I was reading. The ending was also really good. I wasn't sure how the author would resolve the conflict, especially when he talked about Sawyer's equipment being flown to Canada. I just didn't buy it. What actually happened though was great and I felt satisfied.

    Overall, I'd recommend Plague Year as a quick read for someone who doesn't generally read sci-fi but likes the premise of the story. It avoids the unpronouncable names and (mostly avoids) the technobabble that can turn people off from the genre.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2008

    Great Read

    From the first sentence, the story starts reeling the reader in... It is very well-crafted and very well-edited.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2007

    A reviewer

    This was a great book that kept me on the edge of my seat. I could not put it down. I really hope to read more by this author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2007

    Great Book

    Kept me on the edge of my seat - literally! I stayed up late reading this. Will be looking for more from this author!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2007

    A reviewer

    A nano-virus outbreak occurs in the San Francisco Bay Area and spreads to the rest of the state in a matter of days. Within a week, the continent is infected. After 2 months the entire world. The virus is simple. It devours most mammal and bird flesh and makes a copy of itself. But it self destructs at .7 atm air pressure. Thus the last remnants of the human race cling to any mountaintop over ~9600 ft elevation. New wars and old hatreds flare up as the remaining scientists attempt to solve the nanovirus in India, Colorado, and aboard the International Space Station. What I liked the most about this book was the little scientific details the author used. Unlike most pop-sci writers today, he actually sticks with his premise and considers all the consequences, both social and environmental. For instance, insects now rule anything below 10000 feet. China had time to militarily annex Tibet. Russia is struggling against Afghanistan. Germany, France and Italy fight over the Alps... He also brings up the science of nano tech, although it is only a surface view. I would have liked more there, but the flow of the plot would probably have been interrupted. Anyway, I highly recommend it for people who like Post-apocalyptic stuff, or 'realism' sci-fi.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    a reviewer

    They were created with good intention as a cancer cure. They proved quite successful at curing cancer although the host died in the saving since the horde of nanotech machines use carbon based living species to procreate. Like a blitzkrieg that is faster than any disease ever spread, humans or animal die unless they attain altitudes above 10,000 feet as the nanotech machines fail to function 5,000,000,000 humans are dead in the first wave. --- High in the Sierra Mountains of California, Cam and a few people have established a small camp. However to survive they make dangerous excursions to where the nanotech machines operate seeking carbon life forms. When those dangerous expeditions fail, they turn cannibal. Over time the survivors make contact with another group and soon learn that the orbiting International Space Station might contain mankind¿s last salvation against the plague of the nanotech machines. --- The fascination with PLAGUE YEAR is how fast humanity becomes beasts with survival all that matters as Cam and others recognize that they are monsters just like the nanotech machine. Murder and cannibalism is a way of life as civilization is yesterday¿s news. Interestingly most of the conflict thus is mano vs. mano as much of the exciting story line focuses on the survival efforts of Cam and his mates willing to kill (and eat) one another as needed. Thus no one is truly a hero, but no reader will care as Jeff Carlson provides a terrific cautionary tale of science paving the road to hell. --- Harriet Klausner

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    Posted December 1, 2010

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    Posted January 7, 2010

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    Posted January 18, 2010

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    Posted June 26, 2011

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    Posted August 7, 2010

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    Posted September 30, 2012

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    Posted October 27, 2010

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