Customer Reviews for

Playing the Game

Average Rating 3
( 45 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(6)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted September 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Barbara Taylor Bradford writes a fresh engaging epic

    In London, art dealer and restorer Annette Remmington successfully hosts her first major auction of a lost Rembrandt she recovered, saved and sold. Her much older spouse of two decades, Marius demands she allow a media interview to push her fame beyond fifteen minutes as he believes the right journalist will recognize his wife's art genius.

    Always obeying her mentor who she feels gratitude towards, Annette meets with Marius' hand-picked reporter Jack Chalmers. While working on her article, Jack and Annette are attracted to one another. She is caught between her desire for the man her own age and the older man who taught her everything she knows. However, the reporter soon uncovers a scandalous dark secret that if revealed could destroy Annette, Marius and even Jack.

    Although an older man marrying and mentoring a younger woman with a hunk her age forging a dysfunctional triangle has been done many times (see Control by Kayla Perrin), Barbara Taylor Bradford writes a fresh engaging epic due mostly to the glitzy ultra rich art world. The lead trio is fully developed so the readers understand what drives each of them. Readers know what to expect from Ms. Bradford and with Playing the Game she provides it to her fans.

    Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The setting elevates this novel

    I can vividly remember reading Barbara Taylor Bradford's first novel, A Woman of Substance, back when I was in high school. Her heroine, Emma Harte, was a brave, strong protagonist, a woman who could overcome anything and run a huge department store, while navigating the tricky waters of romance. I read many of Bradford's subsequent books, but I haven't read one in awhile. Bradford has been a successful author for over 30 years, mostly by sticking to her formula of strong female characters overcoming the odds through hard work and strength of character, and adding in a forbidden romance. Her latest novel, Playing the Game, sticks to the formula. Annette Remington is a successful art dealer in London, married to a much older man. She becomes famous for selling a long-lost Rembrandt painting at auction, and soon the entire art world knows who she is. But Annette has a secret from her past, one that her husband knows of and has used to keep control of her. Bradford weaves tidbits of Annette's disturbing past, expertly piquing the reader's curiosity about the truth. We know that Annette and her sister Laurie were the victims of violence in their childhood, and that Laurie is now in a wheelchair. Is the secret related to their childhood? And why does Annette panic when someone comes looking for a woman named Hilda Crump? All these questions keep the reader turning the page. While I found the novel to feature typical characters in a familiar plot, with a beautiful woman keeping a secret while falling into forbidden romance, it is the setting that elevates this novel. I found the art world totally fascinating, and Bradford does a marvelous job immersing the reader into that world. One of the most compelling reasons that I read is that I can learn about something I never knew before, and this book is filled with interesting facts about fine art, art restoration and art forgery. I learned that a priest hole is a small room in old homes where, during the Stuart period in England, aristocratic Catholic families hid their priests when the soldiers came to search the houses. I never knew that before, and now I have new cocktail party conversation. Playing the Game comes at a good time; many people are talking about Steve Martin's novel, An Object of Beauty, and this is a good companion book for those looking to continue their immersion into the world of fine art.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2010

    Slow Start but Good Read

    This is the first book that I have read of Ms. Bradford's and I was excited to be peeking in the world of an author that I am not familiar with. Playing the Game is centered around the life of Annette Remmington, a rising star in the art world, and her struggles to succeed in not only her art consultant business but in her personal life as well. Married to the controlling, manipulative Marius, Annette's life is turned upside down when she starts to fall for the young journalist, Jack Chalmers, who confesses his love for her. As the story progresses, we start to learn the truths about Annette's past and why it continues to haunt her in her present life. For me, this book was a little difficult to get into as it moved rather slowly in the beginning and seemed to drag out in places that could easily have been avoided. Once I got to the middle of the book, it started moving much more quickly and kept me intrigued for the remaining pages. There are some brief flashbacks brought to life in the book about Annette's childhood that some may find disturbing, but other than that it would be a good read for mature audiences. Overall, I give this book 4 stars as it is a nice quick read, once you get past the beginning, and the characters are well written and can easily be related too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2014

    Tap here

    It looks like a good book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2012

    love all she writes

    All her books are winners, nice relaxing read. I am always waiting for the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2012

    SLOWEST SHIPMENT EVER!!

    I can't review the book because I have waited over a month for the order to be shipped!!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Fair

    Kind of slow. Too much time was spent on art descriptions. Just not my kind of book.

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  • Posted October 10, 2011

    Highly recommended

    Very interesting mainly because of the Art «notion» which is very well explained.

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  • Posted September 6, 2011

    fair

    her first book Woman of Substance was her best Now they are simplistic
    won't buy again

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  • Posted July 21, 2011

    This is a must to read.

    I just wish she would write more books! a fabulous read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

    By Barbara Toylar

    Barbara has a game in the book she made or she wrote and I like the book because it has a game in the book!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2010

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    Posted November 27, 2010

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    Posted August 19, 2012

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    Posted June 23, 2011

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    Posted July 12, 2011

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    Posted December 11, 2011

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    Posted July 31, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
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