Customer Reviews for

The Postmistress

Average Rating 3.5
( 541 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(108)

4 Star

(173)

3 Star

(155)

2 Star

(61)

1 Star

(44)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

24 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

Brutal battle of love and war in Great Britain and the USA

This novel should become a real masterpiece. Sarah Blake captures the reader, transplants them into the late 1930's and early 1940's, and places them in the minds and bodies of those living before and during World War II. From a small New England town Frankie Bard wen...
This novel should become a real masterpiece. Sarah Blake captures the reader, transplants them into the late 1930's and early 1940's, and places them in the minds and bodies of those living before and during World War II. From a small New England town Frankie Bard went to London and researched news and interest for Edward R. Murrow, the voice America knew as he reported for CBS from London and vicinity during that war. Frankie eventually started doing her small bits on Mr. Murrow's show. Her voice also became known from her own human-interest stories and news.

The area was a sea of bombed and burned out buildings from which the residents of the area fled when the warning sirens went off and hustled to get underground to the protected shelters. As they stayed in those crowded shelters they could hear bombs going off above and feel the blast of the shells. They could smell the burning buildings, and taste the dust that crept into every corner of the city, above and beneath ground.

Back in the United States Iris James became the Postmistress of the post office that happened to be in the same town where Frankie Bard lived. The town was directly on the coast with some of those in town always on the lookout for German submarines surfacing off their coast. The war was far away but one never knew about the Germans and their war machine. Emma and Will Fitch had married. Will was the town doctor. Will got the urge to go to England to help all the wounded but of course, Emma was dead set against that. She knew after a short time that Will would never be happy until he did leave and tend to those in misery. Little did Will know that Emma was pregnant when he left and he would not find out as long as he was away.

The descriptions sent out to the world by Frankie and Edward Murrow gave an idea of just how bad London and surrounding areas had been hit but still the people were so resilient that they bounced back. Of course there were casualties, wounded and dead, but those able had to carry on, and they indeed did. The United States was not in the war yet even though many around the world felt they should be. Frankie asked permission of Edward Murrow to go to Germany and other nations under their control to report what she was able. Being American she could travel fairly easy but when she did travel, the brutality she saw hurt her deeply. She reported it as well as possible but the censors stopped all but the normal news, or in some situations she could "code" words or phrases to get the news out. She saw the persecution of the Jews, the killing of those considered a "danger" to the Germans, the torture of humans, and the hurt imposed on their daily lives.

Frankie had a primitive recording device she used to record the sounds and voices of those she met along the way. When she ran out of recording discs she recorded over at least one of them not knowing what would be on that disc. Frankie eventually and suddenly went home to try to recoup her mind and body but there was no way to get the horrible things she had seen out of her memory. She tried to fit into the small town again but had a very hard time talking to people. She kept seeing and hearing things from her trip. She played and replayed the discs.

Here I will stop describing this fantastic book. By now you have to have whetted your minds appetite to read this book. If "Postmistress" doesn't win a lot of writing awards I will be very disappointed. S

posted by CBH on December 22, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

19 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

Not enough there

The Postmistress is a novel focusing on three American women in the early days of World War II, prior to the US entering the war. The title itself is misleading; the postmistress of the town is a main character, but she certainly isn't the focus of the book.
The book...
The Postmistress is a novel focusing on three American women in the early days of World War II, prior to the US entering the war. The title itself is misleading; the postmistress of the town is a main character, but she certainly isn't the focus of the book.
The book jacket's description describes a letter not being delivered, which implies that it is a key turning point; I found that once this happened (halfway through the novel) the fact that it was not delivered was irrelevant to the story. There are a number of other plot points that I found to be either not relevant or not fully resolved by the end.
I really wanted to love this book, and there are passages that are excellent, but as a whole I was disappointed.

posted by Biblio_Sue on October 22, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 61 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 4
  • Posted October 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Not enough there

    The Postmistress is a novel focusing on three American women in the early days of World War II, prior to the US entering the war. The title itself is misleading; the postmistress of the town is a main character, but she certainly isn't the focus of the book.
    The book jacket's description describes a letter not being delivered, which implies that it is a key turning point; I found that once this happened (halfway through the novel) the fact that it was not delivered was irrelevant to the story. There are a number of other plot points that I found to be either not relevant or not fully resolved by the end.
    I really wanted to love this book, and there are passages that are excellent, but as a whole I was disappointed.

    19 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 10, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Had such potential - but BORING!

    The descrption of this book really intrigued me and the idea the author had was great, but it was so boring! She could have done so much more with it, I think. I found myself not at all caring about the characters and it was pretty predictable. The only thing I liked about it was that it gave me a bit of an inside view into WWII and I (being NOT a history buff) learned things I wasn't aware of (if they're true). But I would not recommend this to anyone, being a mom of two young boys I rarely get to read and found this to be a waste of time. The only reason I finished it was that I hoped for a great twist. Never happened.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 8, 2010

    Overall, not worth the time.

    Interesting from a historical perspective regarding mood in the U.S. prior to involvement in WWII. However, the characters and story build so slowly and the story line is very predictable. There's no intrigue. I was fairly bored until about two-thirds into the book. Just kept reading to see what would eventually happen.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    Not my cup of tea

    I had a hard time reading this book and keeping the story straight. Disjointed or something. I dont know what it was. But I did read it to the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Not a fan

    This book was predictable and boring. I had high hopes but the characters are bland and cliche

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 14, 2010

    Boring

    I kept waiting for something significant to happen and it didn't. The characters and plot were predictable and not well developed. I didn't care much about them. The idea of NOT delivering news to the pregnant wife was ridiculous. Who did those people think they were? My book club read this and not one person liked it or would recommend it. I expected a lot better based on print reviews.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2014

    Well-written but disappointing

    This book is written SO WELL. I loved the author's writing instantly. However, the plot never really came together and then I felt that it just ended. I would not recommend this to a friend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    When I purchased this book, I had high hopes. But when I began

    When I purchased this book, I had high hopes. But when I began reading, I could not follow the story line. The transition from one character to another was very disjointed. The only character that I truly like was Frankie Bard. The Iris character, I could not get a handle on. The title of the story is the Postmistress, but I could not get the connection. Must be missing something. The author should have made Frankie the main character and then used the other characters as secondary. The story went from England to Germany and then US. Too disjointed. I finally got into the storyline at the end and it was over. Disappointing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 21, 2011

    Slow moving...

    This novel moved at a turtle's pace. The premise behind the story sounded intriguing, but did not deliver. It was hard to care about the characters and understand the choices they made. The ending was predictable and obvious. Skip this one!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 20, 2010

    Disappointing

    I read reviews of this book that compared it to "The Help" and "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society", which were great books. This book was nothing like those. It could have been an interesting story, but was simply depressing. The only character that was at all likable was Frankie but nothing really developed with her. I did find the writing style interesting as it read like an old movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 13, 2010

    Can't get into it

    I pick up this book several times a week but it just doesn't not hold my interest. I keep thinking it will get more interesting the further I read into the book. Some of her discriptions just don't seem to match the time period of World War II years. I'll keep reading it and I expect it to become interesting, as it sure has been highly acclaimed elsewhere.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A nice effort

    The Postmistress is a story about the affects of World War II in the eyes of several characters. There is Frankie, a journalist who at first reports what she sees and detaches herself from it's effects. Through a series of events, her attitude regarding the war takes a drastic turn. There is Emma, who is innocent and sees the world through rose colored glasses. Iris is a government worker who is strong in her convictions and decides to take matters in her own hands when a situation prompts a difficult and emotional decision. The descriptions in England on the Blitze and interviews with some characters in the story make the story come to life. You start to feel as if you are a part of the story.
    The story on a whole is slow starting and there are periods when it is hard to keep up with because it jumps around from one character to the next frequently. Once you are past these parts, the story becomes more cohesive and enjoyable.
    If you enjoy stories about war, there is a series called Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear. It's set in the early 1900's during and after World War I. The stories are compelling, the descriptions wonderful and the writing is excellent.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Disappointing

    The premis of the book,the beautiful book cover and the synopsis on the inside of the book cover all provided a great sense of anticipation to the start of The Postmistress. Unfortunately, that quickly changed at the beginning of the book. The rapid changes from scene to scene and character to character caused some confusion and frustration. But even after getting into the rhythm of the book, such as it was, I never made a connection with the characters, nor did the characters connect in the end. They were disjointed and just never fully came together. There were several scenes that seemed pointless, and left me wondering "What does that have to do with anything?". The middle section of the book focused on a reporter's train ride through Europe during World War II. The author did a good job of portraying the plight of the Jews during this timeperiod. Some of the scenes were very emotional and heart rendering. But all in all, the book failed to deliver and fell short on what was a great idea.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 61 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 4