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The Postmistress

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

24 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

Brutal battle of love and war in Great Britain and the USA

This novel should become a real masterpiece. Sarah Blake captures the reader, transplants them into the late 1930's and early 1940's, and places them in the minds and bodies of those living before and during World War II. From a small New England town Frankie Bard wen...
This novel should become a real masterpiece. Sarah Blake captures the reader, transplants them into the late 1930's and early 1940's, and places them in the minds and bodies of those living before and during World War II. From a small New England town Frankie Bard went to London and researched news and interest for Edward R. Murrow, the voice America knew as he reported for CBS from London and vicinity during that war. Frankie eventually started doing her small bits on Mr. Murrow's show. Her voice also became known from her own human-interest stories and news.

The area was a sea of bombed and burned out buildings from which the residents of the area fled when the warning sirens went off and hustled to get underground to the protected shelters. As they stayed in those crowded shelters they could hear bombs going off above and feel the blast of the shells. They could smell the burning buildings, and taste the dust that crept into every corner of the city, above and beneath ground.

Back in the United States Iris James became the Postmistress of the post office that happened to be in the same town where Frankie Bard lived. The town was directly on the coast with some of those in town always on the lookout for German submarines surfacing off their coast. The war was far away but one never knew about the Germans and their war machine. Emma and Will Fitch had married. Will was the town doctor. Will got the urge to go to England to help all the wounded but of course, Emma was dead set against that. She knew after a short time that Will would never be happy until he did leave and tend to those in misery. Little did Will know that Emma was pregnant when he left and he would not find out as long as he was away.

The descriptions sent out to the world by Frankie and Edward Murrow gave an idea of just how bad London and surrounding areas had been hit but still the people were so resilient that they bounced back. Of course there were casualties, wounded and dead, but those able had to carry on, and they indeed did. The United States was not in the war yet even though many around the world felt they should be. Frankie asked permission of Edward Murrow to go to Germany and other nations under their control to report what she was able. Being American she could travel fairly easy but when she did travel, the brutality she saw hurt her deeply. She reported it as well as possible but the censors stopped all but the normal news, or in some situations she could "code" words or phrases to get the news out. She saw the persecution of the Jews, the killing of those considered a "danger" to the Germans, the torture of humans, and the hurt imposed on their daily lives.

Frankie had a primitive recording device she used to record the sounds and voices of those she met along the way. When she ran out of recording discs she recorded over at least one of them not knowing what would be on that disc. Frankie eventually and suddenly went home to try to recoup her mind and body but there was no way to get the horrible things she had seen out of her memory. She tried to fit into the small town again but had a very hard time talking to people. She kept seeing and hearing things from her trip. She played and replayed the discs.

Here I will stop describing this fantastic book. By now you have to have whetted your minds appetite to read this book. If "Postmistress" doesn't win a lot of writing awards I will be very disappointed. S

posted by CBH on December 22, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

19 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

Not enough there

The Postmistress is a novel focusing on three American women in the early days of World War II, prior to the US entering the war. The title itself is misleading; the postmistress of the town is a main character, but she certainly isn't the focus of the book.
The book...
The Postmistress is a novel focusing on three American women in the early days of World War II, prior to the US entering the war. The title itself is misleading; the postmistress of the town is a main character, but she certainly isn't the focus of the book.
The book jacket's description describes a letter not being delivered, which implies that it is a key turning point; I found that once this happened (halfway through the novel) the fact that it was not delivered was irrelevant to the story. There are a number of other plot points that I found to be either not relevant or not fully resolved by the end.
I really wanted to love this book, and there are passages that are excellent, but as a whole I was disappointed.

posted by Biblio_Sue on October 22, 2009

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  • Posted December 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Brutal battle of love and war in Great Britain and the USA

    This novel should become a real masterpiece. Sarah Blake captures the reader, transplants them into the late 1930's and early 1940's, and places them in the minds and bodies of those living before and during World War II. From a small New England town Frankie Bard went to London and researched news and interest for Edward R. Murrow, the voice America knew as he reported for CBS from London and vicinity during that war. Frankie eventually started doing her small bits on Mr. Murrow's show. Her voice also became known from her own human-interest stories and news.

    The area was a sea of bombed and burned out buildings from which the residents of the area fled when the warning sirens went off and hustled to get underground to the protected shelters. As they stayed in those crowded shelters they could hear bombs going off above and feel the blast of the shells. They could smell the burning buildings, and taste the dust that crept into every corner of the city, above and beneath ground.

    Back in the United States Iris James became the Postmistress of the post office that happened to be in the same town where Frankie Bard lived. The town was directly on the coast with some of those in town always on the lookout for German submarines surfacing off their coast. The war was far away but one never knew about the Germans and their war machine. Emma and Will Fitch had married. Will was the town doctor. Will got the urge to go to England to help all the wounded but of course, Emma was dead set against that. She knew after a short time that Will would never be happy until he did leave and tend to those in misery. Little did Will know that Emma was pregnant when he left and he would not find out as long as he was away.

    The descriptions sent out to the world by Frankie and Edward Murrow gave an idea of just how bad London and surrounding areas had been hit but still the people were so resilient that they bounced back. Of course there were casualties, wounded and dead, but those able had to carry on, and they indeed did. The United States was not in the war yet even though many around the world felt they should be. Frankie asked permission of Edward Murrow to go to Germany and other nations under their control to report what she was able. Being American she could travel fairly easy but when she did travel, the brutality she saw hurt her deeply. She reported it as well as possible but the censors stopped all but the normal news, or in some situations she could "code" words or phrases to get the news out. She saw the persecution of the Jews, the killing of those considered a "danger" to the Germans, the torture of humans, and the hurt imposed on their daily lives.

    Frankie had a primitive recording device she used to record the sounds and voices of those she met along the way. When she ran out of recording discs she recorded over at least one of them not knowing what would be on that disc. Frankie eventually and suddenly went home to try to recoup her mind and body but there was no way to get the horrible things she had seen out of her memory. She tried to fit into the small town again but had a very hard time talking to people. She kept seeing and hearing things from her trip. She played and replayed the discs.

    Here I will stop describing this fantastic book. By now you have to have whetted your minds appetite to read this book. If "Postmistress" doesn't win a lot of writing awards I will be very disappointed. S

    24 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An unforgettable debut novel and simply a Must Read

    The Postmistress is Sarah Blake's debut novel. A literary masterpiece set in pre WW11 America she gives us a glimpse of what life was like. She gives us colorful and unforgettable characters as she takes us through war torn Europe and she does it with grace and style. She keeps you entertained while straining your emotions and pulling your heartstrings.
    Sarah's story is one that's been told a thousand times, a story about life just before and during WW11, but she throws in a twist, a twist called fate and what happens when fate is challenged. And that twist makes this plot so unique. She takes us on a journey with her wonderful descriptive dialogue. She is an amazing storyteller and her words took me to those places from her book and I could see the aftermath of bomb stricken London and pre WW11 small town USA. But what she surely excels in is her characters who are all so well defined and developed that they actually appear three dimensional to me. She takes us right to the heart of her story and shows us faces of the forgotten in Europe and let's us hear their voices. She has strong women characters and shows us just what they're made of. It's a tale of love and loss, of heartache and heartbreak, of friendship, cruelty and hate, hopelessness but most of all hope.
    So come on a trip through time and experience this wonderful, dynamic and unforgettable read for yourself. It's a must read for all lovers of recent historical fiction, lovers of literary fiction and those of us who love all that plus an unforgettable read.

    15 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 14, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    COMPELLING LOOK INTO WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT.

    I'm not usually into war stories but I DO enjoy the demonstration of the good in people.

    This novel of historical fiction is divided into four parts, each part relating to a season in the year of 1941. The author takes you through a year in the life of three female characters and the men that mean a lot to them. The characters are complex.

    Throughout, the author's descriptions are detailed and three-dimensional. You can almost feel their presence. The war and each character's reactions to it are fleeting and ever present in our daily lives.

    The story is compelling. It's not just a war story, it's a story about our past and our future. The book is about making decisions and about being able to live with those decisions afterward, about what defines us as human, what separates us from others and what brings us together. Well worth your time!

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 4, 2010

    You're Gonna Fall In Love With This One! This Winter's Breakout Novel.

    If you're part of a Reading Group don't skip this gem. Terrific characters, a historical setting, unusual plot twists and thoughtful examination of the effects of hard times and love upon husbands, wives,lovers,reporters and civil servants are blended beautifully here. You'll glimpse the London Blitz, the coast watchers searching for U-Boats, the first stirrings of the terrors of Nazi occupation, as well as the solace of love and acceptance, the strength of community and the need to forge one's own path no matter the personal cost.
    Sarah Blake has written a deeply satisfying tale of love and war with emotion, suspense and intelligence like none you've read before.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 11, 2010

    Complex intriguing theme

    The Postmistress has at least three fascinating aspects. The first is the theme. It speaks to the chaos theory in the unfolding of human lives. No matter the direction or intent, life takes on a life of its own and we humans must hang on for the ride. But what happens when one or more people choose to change the outcome for someone else. Does it ever work out the way he or she intends it to? What does this say about how we should live our lives? The second aspect is the setting. It takes place in America and Europe during the years after WWII started but before the US entered the war. Ms. Blake looks at the American mindset, journalism, and the reality of what was happening and how they juxtapose to shape American opinion and action. The third aspect is the role of judgement or prejudice. It reminds me a bit of To Kill a Mockingbird in it's painful look at how often our judgements are ignorant or tragic. It was a painful, thought provoking and beautiful novel.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 30, 2009

    Read This Book

    I believe it was John Cheever who said that a good book is where one hears the rain and the noise of battle. By this standard, The Postmistress is a great success.

    I read about 50 books a year. The Postmistress is easily in my top 5 favorite books read in 2009 and is hands down the most thought provoking, affecting book I've read this year.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This One Delivers

    The book follows the lives of three women in the months immediately preceding the United States involvement in World War II. Iris the new postmaster of Franklin, Mass., is very businesslike, proper, without being prim, and interested in doing the best job she can for the people of her town. Emma, is the fragile looking, out-of-town, newly married wife of the local doctor. Frankie, on the other hand, is a war correspondent in London, broadcasting her impressions of the war back to the people safely at home in the U.S. The paths of these three woman will come to a focal point as the U.S. is drawn to the brink of war. We are reminded in these pages of the endless cruelty of war, the power of love and of loss, the reasons why we have to carry on after senseless tragedy, and the wonderful gift a simple act of kindness can be. Very well written, the book quickly envelopes you in the lives of the characters, with enough twists and surprises to keep you eagerly turning the pages.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderfully written, hard to put down. I loved it!

    The Postmistress is a wonderfully written book that pulls you into the lives of Americans as World War II begins to unfold in Europe. The story brings to life characters as their lives change along with the changes in the war effort.

    I feel the story's main character is Frankie Bard, who is not the Postmistress of Franklin, MA but who, as a reporter, holds the future of one of Franklin's residents in her hands. She sees the war first hand and is most hard hit with the reality of the war's violence. She is only able to report back certain details that must meet the censor's requirements. She is unable to tell the whole story at times and carries the pain within herself. She travels to Franklin, MA on a personal mission to tell a very sad story but later cannot bring herself to complete the task.

    Individual stories later weave together based on their connections to the town. The postmistress, Iris James, senses the stress that is hitting the community as the war becomes more violent and as stories of horrific acts against Jewish communities reach the states - mainly through Frankie Bard's radio broadcasts from Europe. The post office becomes the hub of activity as citizens await word from oversees and want updates from the latest broadcast. Iris has a front row view of her community and also carries the personal pain of her friends.

    This book was hard to put down as Sarah Blake's writing vividly brought each scene to life. She also was able to provide such detail that you personally felt the suspense, pain and frustration of the characters. For as serious of a topic, there were moments of pleasure and enjoyment that helped lighten the overall tone of the topic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Worth the read

    I had read this time era in other books and thought I would continue. The story and characters were wonderfully written, a little quirky, but interesting. The words jump off the page and you can vividly picture the place, people and time. Very enjoyable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    They Said this Was Going to be Better than Help and they were Right!!

    This book was excellent and one that I will read and share over and over again. It was hard initially to get into it. The first 50 pages were confusing but once I understood the three storylines I was really able to get into it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    "War Heard over the Radio"

    Sarah-Blake's poetic imagery carries the reader through a brief time in the lives of a short list of characters in this historical novel set just before America enters WWII. Ms. Blake weaves an interesting tapestry of parallels lives of characters as the reader is drawn into the life of a of a tranquil coastal Massachusetts community and how their decisions impact many more as the story crosses the Atlantic to bombings in London and vivid pictures of fleeing Jewish refugees as recorded through first hand accounts of radio reporter Frankie Bard. Great read for a book club with ample discussion topics.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The Postmistress

    This book is great. It is a very well written book. It gives the reader a look into what is was like during WW2. The characters are great. Sarah choose to use women as the main characters, which makes this book even better. At the time the book is set in women work in the work force due to the war.

    I love the way Sarah writes. She brings the characters to life. You feel like you are there with them as the war goes on. I can't imagine what the people of England and Europe went through. Sarah give us glimpse of what it was like.

    She shows what war can do. She shows us how with one bomb lives can be destroyed and loved ones lost. I simply love this book.

    I am recommending this book to my friends and to my library director. It is a great read. This book will not disappoint the reader. I look forward to reading more of Sarah's books. She has a great talent for delivering a great story and telling in a way that you will feel like you are there with her characters.

    I give this book five stars.

    ReadingPatti

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 27, 2009

    Lives Forever Altered

    If you held in your hands the power to save someone from heartrending turmoil and grief - even if only for a brief time - what would you do? And what if breaching that power meant turning your back on a solemn promise you made to someone who no longer possessed the ability to see that vow through to fruition himself? This is the gut-wrenching dilemma the title character of The Postmistress finds herself facing. Weaving back and forth between the still-tranquil U.S. coast and the blitz-annihilated London of World War II, The Postmistress takes the reader on a riveting journey. It is the tale of three diametrically different women (the staid and proper Iris whose job as postmistresses affords her an intimate glimpse into the town folk's lives; the jaded Emma who desperately clings to the security of true love she has at long last discovered; and the non-conformist Frankie whose radio voice reaches across the ocean to enrapture her listeners by painting a vivid and startling picture of war-torn Europe), strangers who lives soon become inextricably and permanently intertwined. By the final page, their lives will be forever altered and so will yours. The Postmistress is an amazing book from start to finish.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 23, 2009

    A Different View

    Most novels about WWII are about the battles and the men who are fighting the war. There may be some sub-plots about the families of the soldiers, but most of the story is about the battles. Sarah Blake takes a different, intriguing approach: we see the war from the eyes of three ordinary women. Two of the women, Iris and Emma, live in a small Cape town in America. The other viewpoint is from a young woman, Frankie, who is a very idealistic war correspondent, working with Edward R. Murrow. The "American" episodes bring to light the attitude of most Americans before Dec. 7, 1941- not our war. The voice of Frankie, from Europe, gives us a closer look at the effect of this horrible period in history on the everyday people, particularly the Jews who are being displaced, if not murdered. We see what it was like to endure the bombings in London. There is an interesting connection between the two worlds because Iris and Emma listen to Frankie on the radio and are touched in different ways by her broadcasts. Frankie, in turn, has an encounter in London with Emma's husband, a doctor serving as a civilian.
    Ms. Blake has written an excellent first novel. She very cleverly interweaves the stories across the ocean and then brings them together at the end. Her writing style is easy to read yet is lyrical in its presentation. My pencil was out most of the time as I found passages that I just had to underline so I can go back to reread them.
    The characterization in this novel was unusual for me. I didn't really become attached to any of the characters. I didn't find myself "caring" about them. I didn't have a favorite character. These comments probably sound like negatives, but they are not. The characters were more like "Everyman" characters to me. Each represented a point of view for me, rather than representing individuals. In other words, the story and its message was more important to me than the characters. They were conduits to deliver the message, the thoughts.
    I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn a different view of WWII and to be challenged and entertained at the same time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Postmistress

    I don't know who is responsible for choosing the First Look Book Club books at Barnes and Noble, but my suggestion is to steal their reading list and buy every book.

    The Postmistress is an outstanding story that transports the reader back to 1940, the time before WWII started for the United States, but England is being bombed on an almost daily basis. It is the story of love, loss, and survival told through the eyes of a journalist, a doctor's wife, and the Postmistress of a small Cape Cod town.

    Frankie Bard is a journalist on assignment in England with Edward R. Murrow during the Blitz. Frankie sees what is happening to the Jewish people and wants desperately to get the American people involved.

    Emma is the doctor's wife. Newly married she moves to his home town and struggles to find her place.

    Iris James is the postmaster. She is quite clear on the fact that she is the postmaster, because the post office does not have the position of postmistress. To me, this is the perfect description of Iris a by-the-rules, unbending, strict spinster who one day does not deliver a letter.

    Sarah Blake has written an amazing war novel. From the beautiful cover, to the last word, I was enthralled.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Get swept back in time.

    I wasn't sure what to expect from this book. It is set over the course of a year starting in 1940 and going into 1941 before the US enters into WWII. This is not an era I typically read books set in so while I know of it, I don't know any real details. Whatever I learned in school has become pretty sketchy at this point. To me the author really brought the time period alive and made it real. The story is set on both sides of the ocean with the characters being connected by radio. There is Franklin, Mass. where Iris, the postmaster, and Emma, the doctors wife, listen to radio reports and then in London there is Frankie reporting the news they are listening to. These three women are the focus of the story and they are very different. Iris is a 40-year-old unmarried woman who is in charge of the post office, Emma was an orphan who married Will and moved to Franklin a small town on Cape Cod and Frankie is a reporter stationed in London during the Blitz who really brings life and details to the nightly bombing and regular loss of life. I don't want to reveal too much or spoil the story for anyone, but I will say it was a very well written novel with characters who seemed very real. It shows the innocence in the US prior to entering the war, thinking it couldn't really touch the US and also brings alive the plight of the people trying to escape from Europe. Very nicely done!
    http://bookbookseverywhere.blogspot.com/

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Engrossing and Haunting Story

    "The Postmistress" is set in the years 1940-41, both on Cape Cod and in Europe. The reader follows the paths of three women - Emma, Iris, and Frankie - as Europe experiences Hitler's fury and Americans wonder if they will enter the war. Emma has just married Will, a doctor on Cape Cod. She wants to make a good impression on the people there, and make a good home for her husband. Iris is the Postmaster of the same town Emma moves to, and watches over the people of the town. Frankie is a reporter in London during the Blitzkrieg, experiencing some of the horrors of war while trying to report on them. As the story moves along, the lives of these three women intersect around letters. It is up to the reader to decide if the decisions the characters make are good and wise.

    I had the wonderful privilege of reading this book as part of Barnes & Noble's First Look Book Club, and really enjoyed it. It grabbed, and kept, my attention. Sarah Blake painted vivid pictures of bombings, train rides, ocean views, etc., putting me in each spot, letting me hear the characters as they spoke. Her research brings this period of history alive. I especially enjoyed "traveling" along with Frankie as she told the story of the war and searched for the truth about the Jewish persecution. All three of the main characters in this book have compelling stories and they are people I will not soon forget. This is a book to read again!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2014

    beautiful book

    beautifully written, powerful story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2011

    Highly recommended.

    Prompt shipment, well wrapped.

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  • Posted October 19, 2011

    Love this book !!

    I grew up in the day of Edward R.Morrow and his tv news broadcast so this
    took me back to the days when the news was really about the news and not about selling ads on tv. also loved the characters, cried my way through the end, and didn't want it to stop there... I want more of all of them ,
    what happens next?? I had to go out and buy a copy for a friend because she doesn't have a Nook!!! can't wait for her to read it too.

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