Customer Reviews for

The Postmortal

Average Rating 4
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2012

    Truly Excellent.

    Truly Excellent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2012

    Great

    I was really glad I picked this up. Made me think.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    GREAT READ

    Very compelling, couldn't stop reading it

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  • Posted March 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Do You Wnat to Be Forever Young? Really?

    So, the story is, John lives in a world (in the not-so-distant future) where with just a few shots, one can defy the aging process for-ev-er! You could still die from accidents or even disease, but not from growing old. Sounds great, right? The world has always actively tried to stop aging, no more so than right now.

    Well, think again, my friend. With fewer people dying, the world's population (already at a tipping point) becomes a burden on our dwindling resources. Also, the moral and logistical implications of living forever (as long as you are accident and disease free) start to set in. In The Postmortal, anti-cure sects pop up (religious and secular) and it's obvious that not everyone thinks stopping the natural aging process is the best plan ever.

    I think I love futuristic/dystopian/post-apocalyptic novels because I am intrigued by other people's predictions of how our lives might play out in the future under certain circumstances. In The Postmortal, we are given that vision in spades. One of my favorite aspects of this novel was the theoretical consequences of never aging. Such as: Do you really want to be married forever now that it really means eternity with the same person? No retirement plan? No problem, buddy, because you will be working for the next 400 years or so just to sustain your young lifestyle. Think you're bored now, just imagine hundreds of years spread out before you while you live your little life forever and ever and ever...

    The Postmortal is not all gloom and doom (at times it's snarky and hilarious), but it does cleverly present concrete arguments against the quest for eternal life. The plot is well-conceived and the pace is frenzied. I found myself caring about John and wanting to know where this world was going to take him. At the end of the book, I still wanted more! The Postmortal also has has the elements of romance, mystery and thriller that kept me glued to the pages. Great book that I would recommend to anyone curious about the consequences if we all stayed forever young.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    Great read

    I enjoyed this book very much. It does become very violent as it progresses. The ending wasn't my favorite, but I don't know that it could have ended any other way. Im glad I happened upon this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2011

    Interesting read and great fun too.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Darkly Humorous and Terrifyingly realistic!

    What if a group of scientists found a cure for aging? Would you want it? This cure doesn't encompass any diseases like cancer, AIDS, or even the common flu. So, while anyone receiving the "cure" would not age, they would still be susceptible to illness or injury. As the book explains, you would only be assured that when you do die, it would not be peacefully in your bed of old age, you pretty much are guaranteed that it will be nothing so easy. There are plenty of other ways to die, and plenty of other people who want to make sure you do. Drew Magary explores these issues and many of the possible results of this so-called "cure" such as overwhelming population growth, the horrific ways people abuse the "cure", and all of the extreme religious and socio economic repercussions and then presents it in an extremely entertaining and entirely readable narrative.

    To say I was blown away by The Postmortal would be an understatement. The cartoon-like cover image and back cover blurb did not prepare me for how crazy-good this book actually was. I wasn't expecting it. This was so cleverly written. I was drawn in by the rich dark humor and the blunt, candid way the story is told. I would describe this as the "much cooler big brother" to all of the other dystopian novels I've read. I can literally picture some of these events happening within my own lifetime. And that is frightening.

    The Postmortal chronicles one man, John Farrell's journey into postmortal life, after receiving the "cure". The story is told via John's personal journal and from some of the news articles and blurbs from various news feeds he included in that journal. John is almost an anti-hero, flawed in so many ways but his story is still so compelling. The news articles keep the reader updated on what is going on throughout the world and then John's journal shows how these things are affecting people on a more personal level, how they are living through and with these changes. I thought it was a very original and effective way to present a story.

    This world was a terrifyingly realistic place that is all too familiar. The most frightening thing about The Postmortal is that it was so believable. From the strange religious cult to the shady government dealings, and even the mysteriously malevolent "greenies" all of it followed a very conceivable logical sequence. I was both extremely entertained and terrified at the possibility that any of this could actually happen.

    The Postmortal was easily one of my favorite reads of 2011. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys a thrilling dystopian adventure as well as anyone who simply wants to be thoroughly entertained.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2011

    Really makes you think about technological advances!

    This book was amazing. I couldn't put it down! It really makes you think about the future and the ups and downs of technological advancements that will no doubt happen to our world eventually. I highly recommend!

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  • Posted July 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    fans who enjoy a leisurely something different science fiction tale will want to read The Postmortal

    The postmortals voluntarily have taken the Fountain of Youth Cure gene therapy that allows the recipient to remain eternally young. Though aging has been defeated that does not mean the individual cannot die as accidents, homicides, suicide and illness can still kill a person.

    John Farrell who is about to take the Cure soon learns that perpetual life causes a new set of problems as the population explodes since few people are exiting. Resources have failed to keep up since the Cure was found six decades ago and ennui remains a problem for those with nothing to pass the years with like John the blogger. Thus Now in 2090 John explains life has issues that are not that different from those who lived in the pre Cure era.

    This is superb clever futuristic science fiction that makes the case of eternity does not necessarily denote happiness. The story line focuses on the definitive account by John the blogger that is accepted as an accurate and valid look at the first decades after the Cure because it is written down. The story line is passive, which enhances the belief that eternity is another word for enervating ennui, but also lacks passion and action. With insight on individual and global consequences, fans who enjoy a leisurely something different science fiction tale will want to read The Postmortal.

    Harriet Klausner

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    Posted September 21, 2011

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    Posted November 8, 2011

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