Customer Reviews for

Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East: 1776 to the Present

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2007

    A fascinating historical account

    A meticulously researched and brilliantly narrated book, Oren's work puts America's involvement in the Middle East in its historical context, providing a much-needed perspective at a time when this involvement is at its height. If we are to truly understand the origins of this complex and unique involvement, 'Power, Faith, and Fantasy' is a must read. Writing with the factual precision of a historian and the flair of a novelist, Oren delivers an impressive account that spans over 230 years of American history. This is a compelling, informative, and indispensable read from a critically acclaimed historian.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2007

    Required Reading

    At first glance, this book may seem like a tome of historical facts. But read the first few pages, and it becomes evident that it is more than just history. Rather, this book reads like a story its storyteller is a renowned historian whose attention to facts and details is, unfortunately, unique. In addition, it teaches (and reteaches) American history, Middle Eastern history, and world history. It is a reminder that every historical detail is related to something else and does not happen in a vacuum events and their consequences change the course of history forever. This book is a necessary read for everyone--skeptics, scholars, and the general public alike. It is time to see history in a balanced and factual light. This book provides that necessary perspective.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2007

    A good starting point

    This is a good starting point in gaining understanding of US/Middle East relations. Extremely readable, entertaining, with great descriptive passages that easily transport the reader back in time. I was very excited about the book until I found some factual errors that even a cursory edit should have caught...ie: the founder of the Mormon church was JOSEPH Smith. This makes me have niggling doubts about Oren's other conclusions, but I'll still recommend it as a springboard to other studies. Sylvia Hodges, McAllen,Tx

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2007

    A comprehensive study

    Written in a style that helps one get through its 600+ pages, this is an excellent survey of America's experience in the Middle East and a good initial read for someone interested in our experience there. Extremely detailed in the pre-WW II period although the postwar period seems a bit rushed. Especially good in its descriptions of the Barbary Wars of the early 1800s, the role of American missionaries in establishing major universities and medical institutions in the Arab World and Truman's postwar struggle with the issue of Israel. The comprehensive bibliography is a superb starting point for futher study. Unfortunately, my enjoyment of this book was diminished by its numerous errors involving minor points that had little to do with its overall theme (e.g. Marlon Brando's name on a list of Hollywood stars in 1940, three years before his first role in a high school play). Although this could be attributed to sloppy fact checking or editing, I still had nagging questions about what else in the book might be inaccurate.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2008

    Unrealized potential

    Oren uses an interesting technique of looking at US-middle east relations through small biographies of various individuals who were personally involved in historical events. The problem with this technique is that many claims are often exaggerated, at times false, which damages the overall reliability of the historical account he provides. The scope of this book was certainly ambitious, and I was excited to read it, but the factual inconsistencies and poor editing (for which I do not blame the author), made my experience with this book frustrating. I would recommend looking elsewhere for a more reliable historical account.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2007

    Excellent History

    A brilliant history of American relations in the MidEast. A necessary reference book, and a nice one to put on your bookshelf, for all students, policy-makers, and curious cats. Well-written, superbly-researched, and accurately portrayed, this book is an instant classic.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2007

    Excellent Read!

    I really enjoyed this book, which finally clarifies why we are now in this mess. Just as Europe chose to pay off the bandits in the 1700s, they chose to do the same today. Excellent book. I highly recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2007

    How can this be considered history...

    So many of his 'facts' are pure fiction. The reference he makes to the Rev. George Bush, who wrote the book The Valley of Vision (among other works), being a forebear of our current President George Walker Bush and his father George Herbert Walker Bush is pure fiction! And include in his misstated 'facts' this one: John Smith founded the Mormon faith. Not true again! It was in actual fact Joseph Smith, Jr. It makes the reader question all of his so-called 'facts'. This work should be placed on the shelves in the fiction section. It is poorly researched and, although written with the voice of authority, it is not even close to being factually accurate!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1