Customer Reviews for

The Prestige

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2009

    So Many twist! 5 stars!!

    Wow this book was great i never thought there could be so many twist in a book and it was very well written. At times it was a little slow but this was a very good book that will get you caught up in the magic that this book delivers i recommend this to everyone!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2007

    Well worth the wait!

    It's funny how things work out sometimes. I know I have had 'The Prestige' lying around for a while to be read, but when I finally did get around to reading it last month, the sales slip that I routinely keep in my books to date when I purchased them said I bought it on February 5, 1998 -- and so, so much has passed in my life since then, so I think it's only appropriate how this book so amazingly looks backwards into the bygone era of magic. It's amazing how wistful also this book has made me for the era of the classic magician and prestidigitator resplendent in tuxedoes, best exemplified by someone like Mark Wilson, now that we are in an age of either flashy showmen such as David Copperfield or the down-and-dirty 'street magician' like David Blaine 'who's really from my hometown, I must add' and Criss Angel. At any rate, 'The Prestige' is simply a well-written, wonderfully-paced novel, a snapshot of 19th Century life with all its centering on arcane science, somewhat-hypocritical morals, and fascination with the paranormal. Nikola Tesla's presence, while unannounced in the blurb, was very welcome, and I must say that, much like the entire novel, I was pleased that his presence did not insult my intelligence, leaving me to draw my own conclusions on the extent of his scientific acumen and achievements and not at all painting him as a cult figure one step removed from Aleister Crowley. Yes, this can be a challenging book to read -- just who is Alfred Borden, for example? -- but as I said, Christopher Priest will not hit you over the head bluntly with easy answers, instead letting you formulate your own. Overall, I cannot recommend this novel enough, and I now wait with bated breath to see the movie, although I cannot imagine how even such sublime actors as Hugh Jackman and Christian Bale can top this book. Not quite horror, not quite science fiction (let alone steampunk), not quite merely a character study or documentary of 19th Century magic, all I can deem 'The Prestige' is...highly recommended.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    exciting time paradoxical award winning thriller

    Chronicle reporter Andrew Wesley receives the book, Secret Methods of Magic by Alfred Borden, from his adopted father who said a woman asked him to forward it to him. A note from K. Angier is sent to his editor offering information to Andrew on newsworthy Father Franklin. K. is Lady Katherine who sent him the Borden book she claims they knew each other as children and that her father killed him. He has been haunted by similar memories feeling he shares his body with someone else. They team up looking at their respective family trees seeking the links. --- Alfred Borden fanatically exposes those magicians he considers a fraud. In 1878, Alfred tries to prove that talented Rupert Angier is a con artist at a séance that the latter and his spouse host. During a melee, the zealot pushes Rupert¿s pregnant wife causing a miscarriage. Outraged Rupert vows vengeance. As both rise in popularity, Alfred learns how to use the new science of electricity to transport from one spot to another. Rupert travels to Colorado to obtain the help of reclusive electricity guru Nicola Tesla. While Alfred¿s stunt is a parlor trick Rupert obtains the genuine article. However, tragedy hits their descendents including Andrew and Katherine when Alfred pulls the plug on Tesla¿s gizmo as Rupert performs the stunt. --- This exciting time paradoxical award winning thriller hooks the audience once the story line reverts to the mid nineteenth century and keeps readers guessing as to what is going on and will happen. The cast past and present are fully developed so that the feud between Rupert and Alfred feels so real that in turn makes them human and the curiosity of their descendents to learn the truth also feels genuine. Fans will appreciate the amateur sleuth modern day subplot and the companion historical science fiction that blends into a superb thriller. --- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2002

    Slow Going, But With a Substantial Reward

    The Prestige is a wonder for any who can love the art of fiction, and revel in its craft. Focusing on two victorian stage magicians, the real magic is how Priest convincingly fools the reader through his narrative, while admitting to the reader he is misdirecting them. The characters are well built, and intruguing, and Priest drives an old fashioned plot by hinging it to the character's modern descendants. But what I found most invigorating was that the ending revelation brought relevance to the beginning of the book. It was a great reward for a beginning that had, at first glance appeared to be slow going. Yet, on every parade a little rain must fall. Priest's science is unexplained and confusing. It does not make up a large section of the book, but hard-core science fiction fans will be dissapointed. His prose is tremendously well crafted and carefully built, but his science needs more research. If you can look past that point, and believe that the slower parts of the book are necesary for the ending reward, this book is not only a fabulous read, but one to read again and again.

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    Posted January 6, 2010

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    Posted March 28, 2011

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    Posted April 4, 2009

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    Posted December 14, 2009

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